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The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence
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The Declaration of Independence

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Presentation from the DOI in class 2011

Presentation from the DOI in class 2011

Published in: Education, News & Politics
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  • http://www.historyimages.com/patriotic/Independence-Hall.jpg
  • http://americanhistory.si.edu/presidency/images/medium/03_G_004_M.jpg
  • Acting under the instruction of the Virginia Convention, Richard Henry Lee on June 7, 1776, introduced a resolution in the Second Continental Congress proposing independence for the colonies. The Lee Resolution contained three parts: a declaration of independence, a call to form foreign alliances, and "a plan for confederation." The document that is included on page 22 is the complete resolution in Richard Henry Lee's handwriting. On June 11, 1776, the Congress appointed three concurrent committees in response to the Lee Resolution: one to draft a declaration of independence, a second to draw up a plan "for forming foreign alliances," and a third to "prepare and digest the form of a confederation.“ Because many members of the Congress believed action such as Lee proposed to be premature or wanted instructions from their colonies before voting, approval was deferred until July 2. On that date, Congress adopted the first part (the declaration). The affirmative votes of 12 colonies are listed at the right. New York cast no vote until the newly elected New York Convention upheld the Declaration of Independence on July 9, 1776. The plan for making treaties was not approved until September of 1776; the plan of confederation was delayed until November of 1777. It was in keeping with these instructions that Richard Henry Lee, on June 7, 1776, presented his resolution. There were still some delegates, however, including those bound by earlier instructions, who wished to pursue the path of reconciliation with Britain. On June 11 consideration of the Lee Resolution was postponed by a vote of seven colonies to five, with New York abstaining. Congress then recessed for 3 weeks. The tone of the debate indicated that at the end of that time the Lee Resolution would be adopted. Before Congress recessed, therefore, a Committee of Five was appointed to draft a statement presenting to the world the colonies' case for independence. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=1 http://www.pbs.org/wnet/historyofus/web01/features/see_it_now/images/45.352.jpg
  • http://www.c The Committee of Five - app The committee consisted of two New England men, John Adams of Massachusetts and Roger Sherman of Connecticut; two men from the Middle Colonies, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York; and one southerner, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia. In 1823 Jefferson wrote that the other members of the committee "unanimously pressed on myself alone to undertake the draught [sic]. I consented; I drew it; but before I reported it to the committee I communicated it separately to Dr. Franklin and Mr. Adams requesting their corrections. . . I then wrote a fair copy, reported it to the committee, and from them, unaltered to the Congress." (If Jefferson did make a "fair copy," incorporating the changes made by Franklin and Adams, it has not been preserved. It may have been the copy that was amended by the Congress and used for printing, but in any case, it has not survived. Jefferson's rough draft, however, with changes made by Franklin and Adams, as well as Jefferson's own notes of changes by the Congress, is housed at the Library of Congress.) Jefferson's account reflects three stages in the life of the Declaration: the document originally written by Jefferson; the changes to that document made by Franklin and Adams, resulting in the version that was submitted by the Committee of Five to the Congress; and the version that was eventually adopted. During the following two weeks Jefferson's evolving draft was critically reviewed by other committee members, likely Adams and Franklin, who suggested minor changes, After just 17 days the document was formally presented to the Continental Congress and given its first reading, on Friday, June the 28th onstitution.org/img/committ.jpg
  • http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/jeffdec.html In June of 1776, Thomas Jefferson was part of a Virginia delegation that planned to ask the Second Continental Congress to sever its ties from Great Britain. While that historic body was meeting, Jefferson was assigned to a committee that was asked to write a declaration which enumerated the causes that led to that severance. Finding his lodging in the heart of the city uncomfortable, he removed to the rooms of Jacob Graff. Graff was a well-known bricklayer who had built his house on the outskirts of town but a year before Jefferson arrived. It's probable that Jefferson had to pay a little extra for the rooms as they came furnished. The Graffs lived in the house while Jefferson undertook his task. Situated on the outskirts of town, surrounded by fields and a stable across the street, the house provided Jefferson with the space and distance from the city he needed for his task. Working from the Virginia Constitution as well as an extensive knowledge of political theory Jefferson wrote the document in under three weeks. An author at heart, Jefferson squirmed in resentment as the document was redacted during the final week of June 1776 by his fellow delegates to the Second Continental Congress. The Declaration house exhibit includes a recreation of the two rooms Jefferson rented on the second floor. In it, one sees Jefferson's bedchamber including a tiny bed that makes it hard to imagine how the gangly Jefferson slept at night. One of the only original items in the exhibition is a key to the front door. Jefferson entertained other members of the Congress in the sitting room. The original structure was torn down in 1883. Photographs of the site enabled the National Park Service to build a rather faithful recreation of the original building. Fun Facts The house was once owned by Hyman and Simon Gratz. Their sister, Rebecca, is said to be the inspiration for Walter Scott's "Ivanhoe" and Thackeray's "Rebecca." Jefferson complained about the houseflies from the stable across the street while writing the Declaration of Independence. Jefferson had an account at the City Tavern while writing the Declaration. The site became among other things a print shop and a Tom Thumb diner. The Independence Hall Association (owners of ushistory.org) led the efforts to have the Declaration House rebuilt in 1975 for the Bicentennial. http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/graff.htm
  • http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/jeffdec.html
  • http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/images/decp1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trt001.html&h=1691&w=1100&sz=208&tbnid=AFFCVWOsyhAJ:&tbnh=150&tbnw=97&hl=en&start=1&prev=/images%3Fq%3Ddeclaration%2Bof%2Bindependence%2Bdraft%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26safe%3Dactive%26rls%3DGGLG,GGLG:2005-34,GGLG:en Tj – His habit was to rise early in the morning, soak his feet in cold water, then plunge into his work He intended the document to justify American independence – to be “an expression of the American mind” his personal political philosophy was influenced by various scholars and historical figures – “I did not consider it as any part of my charge to invent new ideas altogether\\
  • www.Vahistorical.org/ sva2003/draft01a.jpg TJ consulted with Adams and Franklin and recorded their reactions Adams thought it was a masterpiece, although maybe a bit too much of a scolding , for such a grave and solemn document Few changes were made, knowing Jefferson’s sensitivity to editing Franklin’s changes were largely stylistic
  • http://www.usflag.org/images/voting.jpg
  • On June 28, 1776, Congress reconvened. The following day, the Lee Resolution for independence was adopted by 12 of the 13 colonies, New York not voting. Immediately afterward, the Congress began to consider the Declaration. Adams and Franklin had made only a few changes before the committee submitted the document. The discussion in Congress resulted in some alterations and deletions, but the basic document remained Jefferson's. The process of revision continued through all of July 3 and into the late morning of July 4. Then, at last, church bells rang out over Philadelphia; the Declaration had been officially adopted.
  • On June 28, 1776, Congress reconvened. The following day, the Lee Resolution for independence was adopted by 12 of the 13 colonies, New York not voting. Immediately afterward, the Congress began to consider the Declaration. Adams and Franklin had made only a few changes before the committee submitted the document. The discussion in Congress resulted in some alterations and deletions, but the basic document remained Jefferson's. The process of revision continued through all of July 3 and into the late morning of July 4. Then, at last, church bells rang out over Philadelphia; the Declaration had been officially adopted.
  • Like Paul Revere, Caesar Rodney is famous for a midnight ride. Rodney's ride ended up at the doorstep of Independence Hall where he cast the decisive Delaware vote for Independence. On June 30, a motion for Independence had been put forward with nine colonies voting for independence, two voting against, New York abstaining while the Delaware delegates had split their vote. Delaware delegate Thomas McKean was in favor of independence, while George Read voted against. Rodney, also a delegate form Delaware was absent during this vote. While there was technically enough support to carry the motion, the Continental Congress didn't want to go forward and declare independence without unanimous support. Rodney had been away from Congress because his role as a Brigadier General in the Delaware militia, forced him back to Delaware to squelch a Loyalist riot. McKean got word to Rodney that his vote for independence was desperately needed in Congress. All night, as the first of July, 1776, turned into the second, Rodney rode through a thunderstorm. He covered 80 miles and arrived at Independence Hall's doorstep in time to cast his decisive vote. Years later Thomas McKean remembered meeting Rodney at the door "in his boots and spurs." Rodney's vote decided the matter. Delaware was going to war. Once the voting for independence concluded and debate resumed, Rodney is remembered for puncturing the self-importance of the Virginia delegates who believed they were the mighty rock on which independence rested."Let [Virginia] be of good cheer," he said, "she has a friend in need; Delaware will take her under its protection and insure her safety." John Adams described Rodney as "...the oddest looking man in the world; he is tall, thin and slender as a reed, pale; his face is not bigger than a large apple, yet there is sense and fire, spirit, wit and humor in this countenance." It was not an appearance to quicken the heart of a woman, however, and it is said that Rodney remained a bachelor because Molly Vining, the woman he loved, married a rector -- and soon after died. http://www.ushistory.org/march/bio/rodney.htm
  • http://www.worth1000.com/web/media/7050/trumbull_signing_of_declaration_of_independence.jpg
  • Under the supervision of the Jefferson committee, the approved Declaration was printed on July 5th and a copy was attached to the "rough journal of the Continental Congress for July 4th." These printed copies, bearing only the names of John Hancock, President, and Charles Thomson, secretary, were distributed to state assemblies, conventions, committees of safety, and commanding officers of the Continental troops.
  • http://teachpol.tcnj.edu/amer_pol_hist/fi/0000002e.jpg
  • http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/images/vc57.jpg First public reading of the Declaration of Independence Pennsylvania militia colonel John Nixon (1733-1808) is portrayed in the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 6, 1776. This scene was created by William Hamilton after a drawing by George Noble and appeared in Edward Barnard, History of England (London, 1783).
  • http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/images/vc52.jpg Destroying the statue of King George III After hearing the Declaration of Independence read on July 9, the American army destroyed the statue of King George III at the foot of Broadway on the Bowling Green in New York City. The French lithographer portrayed the "wild" American soldiers as Turkish Moors, dressed in pantaloons and turbans.
  • On July 19th, Congress ordered that the Declaration be engrossed on parchment with a new title, "the unanimous declaration of the thirteen united states of America," and "that the same, when engrossed, be signed by every member of Congress." Engrossing is the process of copying an official document in a large hand. The engrosser of the Declaration was probably Timothy Matlock, an assistant to Charles Thomson, secretary to the Congress.
  • On August 2nd John Hancock, the President of the Congress, signed the engrossed copy with a bold signature. The other delegates, following custom, signed beginning at the right with the signatures arranged by states from northernmost New Hampshire to southernmost Georgia. Although all delegates were not present on August 2nd, 56 delegates eventually signed the document. Late signers were Elbridge Gerry, Oliver Wolcott, Lewis Morris, Thomas McKean, and Matthew Thornton, who was unable to place his signature with the other New Hampshire delegates due to a lack of space. Some delegates, including Robert R. Livingston of New York, a member of the drafting committee, never signed the Declaration.
  • Transcript

    • 1.  
    • 2.  
    • 3.  
    • 4.  
    • 5. THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 6.  
    • 7. THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE HOUSE
    • 8. THE SECOND CONTINENTAL CONGRESS MAY, 1775
    • 9. <ul><li>Written by </li></ul><ul><li>John Dickinson </li></ul>THE OLIVE BRANCH PETITION
    • 10. RICHARD HENRY LEE of Virginia JUNE 7, 1776
    • 11. - THE COMMITTEE OF FIVE
    • 12. THE GRAFF HOUSE
    • 13.  
    • 14. Social Contract
    • 15. TJ’s DRAFT
    • 16.  
    • 17.  
    • 18. CONGRESS RECONVENES JUNE 28, 1776 JULY 1, 1776
    • 19. <ul><li>JULY 1, 1776 </li></ul>Congress reconvenes YES NH MA CT RI NJ MD VA NC GA NO SC PA TIED DE ? NY
    • 20. <ul><li>JULY 2, 1776 </li></ul>THE MOMENTOUS DAY
    • 21. CAESER RODNEY
    • 22.  
    • 23.  
    • 24. <ul><li>The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epocha in the history of America. I am apt to believe it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival . It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations , from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forevermore. </li></ul>John Adams
    • 25. JULY 2-4, 1776 THE DECLARATION IS DISCUSSED
    • 26.  
    • 27.  
    • 28. THE INTRODUCTION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 29. WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT SECTION SAYS? THE INTRODUCTION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 30. When one group feels like they need to break from another, they must state the reasons why THE INTRODUCTION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 31. THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 32. THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE WHAT IS THE FOUR PART POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY?
    • 33. <ul><li>All men are created equal and have unalienable natural rights </li></ul><ul><li>Governments are made to protect the natural rights </li></ul><ul><li>Governments get their power from the people </li></ul><ul><li>If the government doesn’t protect the people’s rights, the people can overthrow the government and make a new one </li></ul>THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 34. <ul><li>THE SOCIAL CONTRACT </li></ul><ul><li>This argument legitimizes declaring independence </li></ul>THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 35. GRIEVANCES THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 36. GRIEVANCES THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT SECTION SAYS?
    • 37. <ul><li>27 grievances, all against the King (he) </li></ul><ul><li>Actions during the years of 1763-1776 </li></ul><ul><li>Taxes, dumping town meetings, limiting commerce, limiting movement, stationing troops … </li></ul><ul><li>In other words, how their natural rights are not being protected </li></ul>GRIEVANCES THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 38. ATTEMPTS AT RECONCILLIATION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 39. ATTEMPTS AT RECONCILLIATION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT SECTION SAYS?
    • 40. <ul><li>We have done everything possible – asked the King, asked our British brothers – but nothing has stopped the grievances </li></ul>ATTEMPTS AT RECONCILLIATION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 41. DECLARATION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 42. DECLARATION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT SECTION SAYS?
    • 43. <ul><li>We declare independence </li></ul><ul><li>We are completely broken from England </li></ul><ul><li>We have all of the rights and powers of any independent nation </li></ul><ul><li>We will defend this independence with our lives and our honor </li></ul>DECLARATION THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    • 44.  
    • 45.  
    • 46.  
    • 47.  
    • 48.  
    • 49.  
    • 50.  
    • 51.  
    • 52. THE DOI SO WHAT? <ul><li>Impact on the American Revolution </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of social contract </li></ul><ul><li>Used by other American groups in the future </li></ul><ul><li>Used to support future rebellions </li></ul><ul><li>Symbol for the United States </li></ul>
    • 53.  
    • 54.  
    • 55. Homework

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