Composition of seawater
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Composition of seawater

on

  • 263 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
263
Views on SlideShare
263
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Composition of seawater Composition of seawater Presentation Transcript

  • Chemical Composition of Seawater 70% of earth’s surface is covered in water – let’s see what’s in that water!
  • What is actually in seawater? Every naturally occurring element on earth has been found in seawater. Obviously, seawater is mostly water! The rest of seawater is composed of the following
  • Seawater is Consistent Law of Constant Proportions: The ions in the world’s oceans remain relatively constant. In other words… In almost all of the world’s oceans the ratios of each ion to one another remain the same: 55% chloride:31% sodium:8%sulfate:4%magnesium:1%calcuim:1%potassium Q: Can you think of a place that might be the exception to this rule? A: Where rivers meet the sea…river water frequently contains more calcium ions
  • How did the salt get to the sea?
  • Salt is added to ocean water by… • Weathering: On land, rivers carry eroded rock and mineral debris containing salts out to the sea • Seismic Activity: In the deep sea, underwater volcanoes & vents react with seawater and spew lava, rock, and/or mineral debris containing salts into the sea around them
  • Salt is removed from ocean water by… • Sea Spray: We will see evidence of this at Sunken Forest in the spring. Have you seen it on your sunglasses after a day at the beach? (remember Evaporites?) • Sediment Deposits: as sediment falls to the seafloor, sometimes it binds to minerals in the water around it or just gets buried • Biological Activity: through the processes associated with life, marine animals and plants sometimes take in salts from the water around them
  • Q: Why aren’t the oceans getting saltier? Watch and review: http://www.oceanclassrooms.com/resources/storyline/unit3/MS101_U3_C1_SA_1/story.html