Buffalo

Soldiers
Brave
Unsung
Freedom
Fighters of
America with
Lasting Legacies
Overcame

Superhuman
Odds
Leaving
Dignifi...
Introduction
Proud
I’m proud to be an American
I fought in every war you see
Then I had to come back home
and still fight to be free
Bu...
Who are the Buffalo Soldiers?
Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S.
10th Cavalry Regiment of the United Sta...
On the dock in Tampa

In 1898 Tampa natives caught a glimpse of Black
service men in uniform. They arrived to green palm
t...
The Equestrian Legacy
If you see a Black statue/holding a ring on a lawn/
Some say it’s a tribute to the likes of me/
Tend...
The Hell Fighters on 5th Avenue
Returning to America from France, the year is 1919.
Some of us are smiling at the thought ...
Black Lady Liberty

In the words of Sojourner Truth….
That man over there
says that women need
to be helped into carriages...
Tuskegee Airmen

 
During World War II many miracles occurred
Our success was considered “absurd”
Yet we flew like Ravens ...
Dorie Miller 1919-1943
I was the first Black sailor in the Navy to receive the
highest congressional award. Like many befo...
The Bugle Boy

He knows just how to tilt that bugle bell he holds.
If the note he delivers is too low the Sergeant scolds....
The Motto & Monument
We can and we will find a way, of this I’m sure
Born to run, we are ready to journey and explore
Pick...
Special Thanks
To all living and deceased Buffalo Soldiers
The Junior Troopers and the entire Woods and Wanton Chapter
who...
Venus Jones
For more info:
Web: www.venusjones.com
Email: bookings@venusjones.com
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BUFFALO SOLDIERS - A poetic tribute by Venus Jones

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This a power point presentation that was originally created for a Buffalo Soldiers conference in 2005. I always wanted to share it with veterans, educators and American history buffs alike. I spent over 70 hours researching and about the same amount of time tweaking the poems over the years. So please feel free to share and comment on the tribute.

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BUFFALO SOLDIERS - A poetic tribute by Venus Jones

  1. 1. Buffalo Soldiers Brave Unsung Freedom Fighters of America with Lasting Legacies Overcame Superhuman Odds Leaving Dignified Imprints in Every Rugged Step A Poetic Tribute by Venus Jones Copyright © 2005-2013 Venus Jones. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. Proud I’m proud to be an American I fought in every war you see Then I had to come back home and still fight to be free But I’d gladly stand up next to the Klan who believe I have no right to be And say there is no doubt Africans love this land We built it three centuries for free This statue tributes the Buffalo Soldier and it is found at the entrance of the US Army's Fort Huachuca, in Sierra Vista, Arizona.
  4. 4. Who are the Buffalo Soldiers? Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The nickname was given to the Cavalry by American Indian tribe members; the term eventually became synonymous with all of the Black regiments. 369 th Regiment in line formation World War I. In 1866 16 months after the Civil War Uncle Sam came knocking on my door He asked me to help maintain the peace I could stay in uniform and gain a decent feast Just agree to stay separate and 15 steps behind For many of us it was the first taste of dignity we’d find Blacks who served with little to no pay before the enforcement of desegregation of the military in 1952 are considered Buffalo Soldiers. These proud human beings were fighting for survival in two wars at home and abroad. Blacks were known for their thick skin. They could take charge of any situation they found themselves in. They were feared like mighty Buffalo but also respected like Bison.
  5. 5. On the dock in Tampa In 1898 Tampa natives caught a glimpse of Black service men in uniform. They arrived to green palm trees and weather that was tropical and warm. It was the eve of the departure for Cuba but there was still racial debate. They set sail despite the doubt and the hate. Who knew that those who believed Black soldiers were weak would be proven wrong? Who knew they’d return to praise from Roosevelt, five honors and they’d give birth to Bob Marley’s song? On Saturday December 5, 1998 the Tampa Historical Society placed a mark on the northeast corner of Columbus Drive and Central Avenue. This was a sign that proves two units camped in Tampa Heights those honorable Black men in Blue. Ten years prior to that street being marked as a treasured place, John Henry Padgett, Israel Tillman and Charles Vann sat at a round table face to face. The goal to submit the chapter’s first constitution and bylaws to the national association. On August 2, 1997 Troop C, 9 Cavalry Regiment on the Port Tampa dock in Tampa, at WestPoint in New York, Tampa veterans had just Florida - June 13, 1898 cause for celebration. th Tampa had a reason to boast the only Buffalo chapter in Florida from coast to coast. The Woods and Wanton Chapter was the name they chose, in memory of Sergeant Brent Woods and Private George Wanton – Black American Heroes.
  6. 6. The Equestrian Legacy If you see a Black statue/holding a ring on a lawn/ Some say it’s a tribute to the likes of me/ Tending and racing horses in the United States/ Derby/ This is a test of mastery/ Watch as my good friend shakes my hand/ Together we made a pact to ride/ as one/ on God’s green land/ This wild stallion/would put his trust in a soldier from 9th Calvary everyday/ He’s the best horse and I’m the best jockey/ That’s what they all say/ 9th Calvary Soldier (1875-1902) Black soldiers were gifted horsemen/ it’s true/ Black cowboys were a safe bet/as trainers and crew/
  7. 7. The Hell Fighters on 5th Avenue Returning to America from France, the year is 1919. Some of us are smiling at the thought of a clean canteen. Our regiment never lost a captured man; our victory was profound. We were in combat for 191 days, longer than any other unit abound. The enemy called us “The Hell Fighters,” but we began as Infantry 369. After World War I we continued to battle bigotry at home, what a crime. When fighting for the French we were given keys to the land like the National Guard. The first American to receive a French Cross was one of us, for going the extra yard. So this is a joyous occasion as we reunite with our friends and family in that loud crowd! When we were asked to step in the back of the white soldiers our heads were not bowed. We are marching up 5th Avenue stomping hatred in the ground. We are marching up 5th Avenue in front, you can’t bring us down. Because the bed of democracy and freedom is the one that we made. Yet they still asked us to march in the back of our own parade. We said we will lead the way in the city like we did in the field. Ain’t I a man? I’ve proven that I can destroy and rebuild. America, since you’ve given me these tools to deliver and fight. I‘m giving you my left – “Left!” I‘m giving you my right – “Right!” Our finish line is justice and it’s a steady flame within sight The Hell Fighters return from France
  8. 8. Black Lady Liberty In the words of Sojourner Truth…. That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody helps me any best place — And ain’t I a woman? Cathay Williams was the very first Black female soldier to stand in line She was looking for freedom with the ballot on her mind Major Adams inspecting 6888 Postal Battalion So many women followed in her footsteps willing to serve They were medics and postal workers with heart and nerve 7 days a week, over 12 hours, in blistering wind and baking sun, Like their male counterparts lady liberty got the job done.
  9. 9. Tuskegee Airmen   During World War II many miracles occurred Our success was considered “absurd” Yet we flew like Ravens higher than high Racist were in so much awe they wanted to die   We were men and women with talent and skill Destroying the 3/5 myth with pure honor and will We made it through the storm and we made it together Mastering the wood and steel / no matter the weather   Bessie Coleman said, “Prove to yourself you are the best.” And we broke records, surpassing the intelligence test Tuskegee Airmen preparing for flight W orld War II Soaring through the air protecting countless Bombers in flight America had the perfect pilots with freedom in their sight
  10. 10. Dorie Miller 1919-1943 I was the first Black sailor in the Navy to receive the highest congressional award. Like many before me, my works beyond the call of duty were ignored. But when the African-American press picked up the story of my brave deed, they wrote President Roosevelt about a former farm boy, turned hero and Congress agreed. I approached the abandoned post and began shooting at the approaching fighter planes. The Japanese were cutting it a little too close. So I didn’t care about being properly trained. I monitored the flames outside the kitchen on that infamous day. FDR says it was a day that will live in infamy but it wasn’t hard to pull the trigger I just fired for 15 minutes hoping and praying the bombs wouldn’t hit me. Six medals including the purple heart and the WWII victory is what I claim. Later I died in duty but every time the USS Miller sets sail each soldier on board remembers my name. Dorie Miller receives Navy Cross on May 27, 1942
  11. 11. The Bugle Boy He knows just how to tilt that bugle bell he holds. If the note he delivers is too low the Sergeant scolds. “Look alive soldier, your spirit’s not dead!” “Look alive soldier, the song says move ahead!” He wears the kind of brass you can’t pin down. Eyes forward, heads up and boots on the ground. He’ll keep you in step as you march into the mess hall. This soldier plays the heaven out of “Taps”, the final call. Unknown Soldier
  12. 12. The Motto & Monument We can and we will find a way, of this I’m sure Born to run, we are ready to journey and explore Pick up the lesson of courage and leave all baggage behind Let the word forward be in your step and on your mind The key to life is often buried within the red, white and blue So when night comes don’t let freedom escape from you   Keep your family, race and nation’s history close at heart Keep the story of survival at hand when things fall apart So that slavery, greed and imperialism will truly cease We keep on trudging until we find the river of peace For those who crawled and bled to hug the shaking ground For those who swam for hours to see the anthem sound   For those in the trenches fading with the torpedo and tide For those who can see the good and bad on every side God bless America may she be a light across the sea God bless America may she be a land of liberty The Ft. Leavenworth M onument by Trooper Joey Henderson
  13. 13. Special Thanks To all living and deceased Buffalo Soldiers The Junior Troopers and the entire Woods and Wanton Chapter who commissioned this production: Trooper Rose Norris Trooper Frank Bell Trooper Leroy Carolina Trooper Don L. Johnson Artwork by Trooper Joey Henderson The song “Riding Thunder” by The Native Flute Ensemble Photos provided by The National Archives and Records Administration Poetry, Narration & Power Point design by Venus Jones
  14. 14. Venus Jones For more info: Web: www.venusjones.com Email: bookings@venusjones.com

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