Fish morphology powerpoint
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Fish morphology powerpoint Presentation Transcript

  • 1. FISH MORPHOLOGY
  • 2. Fish Morphology• There is a great diversity in shapes of fishes and their body parts• Shapes of fishes are adaptations to the species’ environment and/ or behaviors
  • 3. Body Shape - Fusiform• Streamlined, torpedo-shaped• Fast-swimming fish• Predators, live in open water• Move tail side to side• Examples: tuna, swordfish, shark, striped bass side view front view
  • 4. Body Shape - Compressiform• Compressed from side to side• Quick bursts of speed over short distances• Live among plants and move in narrow spaces• Examples: moonfish, angelfish• Move tail side to sidefront view
  • 5. Body Shape - Depressiform• Flattened top to bottom• Live on bottom• Slow• Flap fins up and down and swim like a bird• Examples: flounder, skates, rays front view
  • 6. Body Shape – Filiform (Attenuated)• Elongated shapes• Live in soft mud, sand or under rocks• Slow• Slither like a snake• Examples: eels, sand lance side view
  • 7. CAUDAL FIN SHAPE• Caudal fin = tail fin• Homocercal – symmetrical• Heterocercal - asymmetrical
  • 8. Caudal Fin Shape – Homocercal - rounded• Large amount of surface area allows sharp turns and quick starts – to avoid predators• Creates drag – fish tires easily• Example: northern puffer, clownfish
  • 9. Caudal Fin Shape –Homocercal - truncate• Allows short bursts of speed to escape predator or constant slow swimming• Less drag than rounded• Bottom-dwelling fish• Example: killifish, flounder, sculpin
  • 10. Caudal Fin Shape –Homocercal - forked• For constant swimming over long distances, reduces drag• Open water fish• Do not need speed to feed or for protection• Examples: many schooling fish, pilot fish menhaden
  • 11. Caudal Fin Shape – Homocercal - lunate• Half-moon shaped• Fast moving, oceanic fish• Less drag, great acceleration, reduced maneuverability• Examples: tuna, swordfish
  • 12. Caudal Fin Shape – Heterocercal • Medium speed • Asymmetrical – top longer than bottom • Provides lift when no air bladder • Reduced maneuverability • Example: many sharksblue shark