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11-02-2009 KFC – NIIT Virtual Worlds For Real World Results
Agenda Splash <ul><li>Business Case </li></ul><ul><li>The Virtual World Solution </li></ul><ul><li>Developing Virtual KFC ...
Business Case
The Virtual World Solution
Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Gr...
Critical Mistakes # Mistake Rationale Consequence Correct action Why this is better F I G Total Net Benefit Basic Cash Han...
Critical Mistakes # Mistake Rationale Consequence Correct action Why this is better F I G Total Net Benefit Basic Cash Han...
Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Gr...
Character Sketches
Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Gr...
Plot Sketches Course: Basic Cash Handling Title Module/Activity Description Interactions-Plays Assoc. TPs and Topics Refer...
Plot Sketches Course: Basic Cash Handling Title Module/Activity Description Interactions-Plays Assoc. TPs and Topics Refer...
Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Gr...
Graphical Mockups
Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Gr...
Narrative Showcase: Problem Customers
Narrative Showcase: Team Member Capstone
Narrative Showcase: Shift Supervisor Capstone
Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Gr...
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Kfc virtual worlds_masie_v1

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  • Sailesh to kick off presentation. Start with brief self introduction, and hand to Karen for brief introduction.
  • Sailesh and Karen to present jointly. So, on to agenda. Basically, we’re going to talk about how we got from blueprints to a fictional training environment. But see, that’s the problem. When people think about building a virtual world for training, they often start imagining what their training might look like if it were set in a video game, or if it were ported to second life. Creating a virtual world that actually works for learning is much more complicated. Creating the graphics, getting the shots, building functionality – that’s the easy part. Today, we’re going to talk about how to get the world to actually feel like a world. How to make it ring true to learners. How to make it a bed for meaningful interactions that drive real world results. But that’s skipping ahead a bit – let’s back up a second and talk about the business case at KFC.
  • Karen to describe the business context behind moving training online. The graphic refers to the massive amount of paper based materials previously needed – feel free to tie that in if you’d like. Below is some sample content you springboard from. So, what led us to build out a massive curriculum for front line employees? Basically, we saw an opportunity that many businesses see nowadays. We had a lot of paper based materials. Lots of paper meant things were often outdated and difficult to find. (Mention Outstart, and drive for eLearning) Tribal knowledge started taking over Needed a way to get everyone engaged with training, and to make the training experience consistent. So, we came up with a bold goal, in essence, we wanted team members to look forward to their next training event as much as they looked forward to their next paycheck. So, we talked to CognitiveArts about the issue. They had an interesting idea that fit well with our BOLD GOAL: Team Members who look forward to their next training session as much as their next pay check.
  • Sailesh to describe basics of the overall solution, transitioning Karen to a more “Virtual World” focused discussion.
  • Karen to give a high level walkthrough of the process map above. We will be looking at the items highlighted in red throughout the presentation because they are the parts we think are most critical to creating a good virtual world. Sample content below. Our focus in developing the virtual world was simple: drama. Our planning process front loaded our design thought towards creating a suitable bed for drama. This is where we get to tips and traps – so get out a notebook. First of all, drama is extremely important – not only to learner engagement, but also to learning itself. Our brains decide what to put in long term storage based on an event’s emotional impact. This is a well known phenomena. So, how did we get drama into our courses? Where could we have gone wrong? What might have gone better? Let’s take a look.
  • Sailesh to talk about the critical mistakes approach. Karen to talk about how it meshed with KFC’s way of thinking. Sample content below. Critical Mistakes Analysis is CognitiveArts’ way of getting at particularly dramatic moments to include in training scenarios. Critical mistakes also serve as prioritized learning objectives. We can’t get into specifics of how the methodology is run, but can say that it focuses on the real decisions that learners need to make in the real world, and that they are gathered through real life observation. Another important point that is often overlooked (NOTE: Trap coming!), is carefully planning out the characters you will use to support a virtual world. There are tons of concerns here.
  • Sailesh to talk about the critical mistakes approach. Karen to talk about how it meshed with KFC’s way of thinking. Sample content below. Critical Mistakes Analysis is CognitiveArts’ way of getting at particularly dramatic moments to include in training scenarios. Critical mistakes also serve as prioritized learning objectives. We can’t get into specifics of how the methodology is run, but can say that it focuses on the real decisions that learners need to make in the real world, and that they are gathered through real life observation. Another important point that is often overlooked (NOTE: Trap coming!), is carefully planning out the characters you will use to support a virtual world. There are tons of concerns here.
  • Another important point that is often overlooked (NOTE: Trap coming!), is carefully planning out the characters you will use to support a virtual world. There are tons of concerns here.
  • Sailesh and Karen to co-present. Karen to talk about how the characters are received in the restaurants. Sailesh to talk about how this is built into our process. Sample content below. There are the logistical ones like how many characters you can afford to shoot, how many characters your development team can juggle, how many characters are needed to make the world feel real. Unfortunately, most folks stop their planning at the logistical check. There is an equally important dramatic analysis that needs to happen. Your characters need to be memorable, and they need to balance one another. If you think about your favorite television show, you can immediately identify character types. Think a little harder, and you can start to see what each character does to drive the story forward. Some characters are there for comedic value. Some tend to create problems that need to be solved. Some provide the voice of reason to make it all feel sane. The important thing here is that the characters each have backstories that you as a viewer will never know. The writers of those shows do know the backstories, and because they stay true to each character’s imagined past, their actions in the narrative ring true. Virtual worlds need the same balance and the same backstories. In this case, we thought about each character’s personal history. We created characters for learners to identify with, both good and bad. We amped up the drama by creating characters which naturally conflicted with each other, characters who were flawed, characters with quirks that ring true in the real world. We’ll get to some sample course dialogue in a minute, but here are some quick tips and traps coming out of our experience. Here’s where a lot of people go wrong: They are afraid to be ambitious with their characters, resulting in bland, corporate sounding, unrealistic, talking heads. They are afraid to be honest. Point blank, lots of companies are nervous about reflecting the reality of the workplace back to learners. That’s a big problem, destroys credibility, and hurts learning. They are afraid to show people making mistakes, so characters are presented without flaw. This is related to 2, but happens enough to warrant a special note. There is an urban myth that showing someone making a mistake in training will somehow cause learners to make that same mistake in the real world. It is simply not true. As a matter of fact, if you show learners someone making a mistake realistically, provide learners with coaching about why it was wrong, and show them the natural consequences of the mistake, they will very likely never want to experience the consequence and will thus avoid the behavior. Beyond what a character is when the curriculum starts, you also need to plan for the characters to grow over the life of a curriculum. In our case, we created growth sheets that tracked key actions for each character in each course. This was particularly important in prerequisited courses, where the prerequisite gave the impression of elapsed time in the virtual restaurant. If a character mentioned that they were going to go on vacation, an account of that vacation followed in the future courses in the curriculum.
  • Plot sketches are the way we describe course outlines. The focus here is on creating drama by leveraging the quirks we built into our characters during character sketching, and the decisions learners make as described in the critical mistakes analysis.
  • After some kind of segue like the one below, Karen to talk about what it was like to collaborate with SMEs and writers to make plot sketches that work. Our plot sketches basically act as a course outline. We put an emphasis on narrative planning, so our outlines put high priority on narrative pacing, story tone, overarching narrative threads, and dramatic user engagement. The more that these planning documents speak about the dramatic playouts, the source of narrative intrigue, the better the courses will be for end users.
  • After some kind of segue like the one below, Karen to talk about what it was like to collaborate with SMEs and writers to make plot sketches that work. Our plot sketches basically act as a course outline. We put an emphasis on narrative planning, so our outlines put high priority on narrative pacing, story tone, overarching narrative threads, and dramatic user engagement. The more that these planning documents speak about the dramatic playouts, the source of narrative intrigue, the better the courses will be for end users.
  • Graphical mockups are really important. The key at the point is very, very simple. Do not say go until you are happy, because these mockups will be used to create everything that follows.
  • Karen to talk about the process from her standpoint, referencing the graphical collateral above. In this case, we have two unique types of restaurant. One to support video and immersive interaction, and the other to handle our more typical scenario based courses. Our artists provide a bunch of sketches of each. Because the bulk of the work for the typical scenario based courses occurs during media production, we’ll cover the planning of the immersive portion here. Here are some of the graphical planning sketches that were created to support the immersive navigation portions of the curriculum. Note everything that needs to be considered when going with this option. All the equipment needs to be accurate, and thus created and rendered individually for expert signoff. The layout has to be to spec, so blueprints are needed to feed everything in. The characters are video based, so the casting talent is a much more difficult process, as is post production.
  • Karen and Sailesh to co-present. Sample content below includes some key points and thoughts to share. So, media and course build are clearly where a lot of the effort is spent, but by leveraging the planning work, and building media intelligently, you can be pretty efficient. For media, we think about media production in layers. We have a background layer (the restaurant setting), the foreground layer (characters), the audio layer (for animated stills), and an interactive layer. So, using our character and setting sketches, we create standard backgrounds to be used in every course. For our normal scenario based courses, we shot backgrounds of an actual restaurant which were run through filters to give a sketched effect. For our immersive navigation courses, we rendered out standard background shots for use in the course. When authors write a script, they simply flip through the standard backgrounds and reference the shot they want on each screen. For the foreground layer, we have two approaches. For animated stills in our standard courses, we shoot standard expressions, poses, and gestures for each character on green screen. All of these shots are categorized by shot type in a large library (often &gt;3000 images per character). When writing courses, authors simply pick the character shots they want from the library and reference them in the script. If a shot does not exist in the library, it goes into a “pickup shot” list that we take care of during a second round of photo shoots. For our immersive courses, the video makes things a little harder. In this realm, we just had to shoot it. No real magic aside from post production chroma-keys. The action layer is built into the templates – the authors simply select the correct template in the script and the functional layer is taken care of. The key in all of this is similar to the key to graphical mockups – do not settle with the first audio read you get from your talent. Do not settle on a character that doesn’t have exactly the right look. PLAN on heavy coaching of talent to get every line just right. You can’t overstate the importance of talent coaching – for a 3 hour audio recording session, we plan for 30 minutes to an hour of solid coaching to help talent get into character. For the course build, we’ll take a quick look at some of the sample output.
  • Cue up dramatic playout from each of three characters. Show how scenario works, explaining the importance of dramatic playouts. Explain that this is “level 1” virtual world. The cast is set, the environment is set, but learners work through more traditional scenario based instruction.
  • Explain the virtual KFC 3D environment, and its role in facilitating simulation based assessment. Show menu screen, transition screen, and complete an activity to show the branching course menu.
  • Explain the idea of “immersive navigation.” Show click in first module to remove debris from lobby. Click “open restaurant,” click on team member at register, and show some conversation turns to demonstrate video and story branching.
  • With this slide up as reference, Sailesh to ask for any questions or comments.
  • Transcript of "Kfc virtual worlds_masie_v1"

    1. 1. 11-02-2009 KFC – NIIT Virtual Worlds For Real World Results
    2. 2. Agenda Splash <ul><li>Business Case </li></ul><ul><li>The Virtual World Solution </li></ul><ul><li>Developing Virtual KFC </li></ul><ul><li>Using the Virtual World for Maximum Benefit </li></ul><ul><li>Narrative Showcase – Examples of the Breathing World </li></ul><ul><li>Question and Answer Section </li></ul>
    3. 3. Business Case
    4. 4. The Virtual World Solution
    5. 5. Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Graphic Mockups Functional Proto Casting Samples Script Media Course Build
    6. 6. Critical Mistakes # Mistake Rationale Consequence Correct action Why this is better F I G Total Net Benefit Basic Cash Handling 7 Counts the register bank by self Wants to quickly handle it; Thinks the CSTM should be doing other tasks to help out There may be disagreement on numbers if the Team Member does not agree with SS's counting, creating problems in accountability and sowing discord Always count register in presence of CSTM Both members agree on the exact amount that has been counted 3 5 4 12.0 8 Hiding/falsifying CSTM overages or shortages by entering or deleting orders or by adding cash Doesn't want CSTM to get in trouble Encourages theft and fails to address training or accountability issues Always report discrepencies in register responsibility TMs struggling with register proceedure can be retrained; TMs who are stealing can be caught         9 Leaving money unattended Gets caught up doing another task; Thinks it's not a big problem to leave money in their office for a few minutes Encourages theft and leads to losses Always drop register pulls in the safe immediately Makes sure that all money pulled from register is fully accounted for 3 5 4 12.0
    7. 7. Critical Mistakes # Mistake Rationale Consequence Correct action Why this is better F I G Total Net Benefit Basic Cash Handling 10 Taking deposit out through the front door, unconcealed Wants to hurry up and get back from bank; feels neighborhood is safe and isn't afraid of robbery Robbery, loss of income, and injury to SS For restaurants with drive-thru, have trusted TM put deposit in product bag and hand it to SS in car through drive-thru window; Restaurants w/o drive-thru: carry deposit to car in product bag while TM watches to ensure safety Deposit is made safely        
    8. 8. Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Graphic Mockups Functional Proto Casting Samples Script Media Course Build
    9. 9. Character Sketches
    10. 10. Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Graphic Mockups Functional Proto Casting Samples Script Media Course Build
    11. 11. Plot Sketches Course: Basic Cash Handling Title Module/Activity Description Interactions-Plays Assoc. TPs and Topics Reference Time (min) 2) Overview Description: The learner selects from a list of questions to ask an experienced SS. The questions will clue learners into the high level cash handling tasks they need to do during: >> Opening >> Running a shift >> Closing These topics are covered in a series of FAQs with characters from the curriculum. As often as possible, the answers are given in the form of stories and examples. Review Media, Review Content, Cash Handling Tasks, All TPs   0:03
    12. 12. Plot Sketches Course: Basic Cash Handling Title Module/Activity Description Interactions-Plays Assoc. TPs and Topics Reference Time (min) 3.0) Cash Handling at Opening FAQ Description: Learners select from a list of questions to ask TMs and SSs that cover the basics of cash handling during the opening of a store. The setting reflects morning shift in ambient sound and lighting: >> Count and Verify the deposit >> Check change fund to ensure sufficient for day >> Setting up the register for the CSTMs >> Making a deposit When finished, the learner is directed to the store to try out cash handling at opening. Review Media, Review Content Cash Handling Procedures for Store Opening   0:03
    13. 13. Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Graphic Mockups Functional Proto Casting Samples Script Media Course Build
    14. 14. Graphical Mockups
    15. 15. Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Graphic Mockups Functional Proto Casting Samples Script Media Course Build
    16. 16. Narrative Showcase: Problem Customers
    17. 17. Narrative Showcase: Team Member Capstone
    18. 18. Narrative Showcase: Shift Supervisor Capstone
    19. 19. Developing vKFC Critical Mistakes Plot Sketches Character Setting Sketches Build Specs PLANNING GLOBAL DEVS COURSE DEVS Graphic Mockups Functional Proto Casting Samples Script Media Course Build
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