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Social Media &Advancement:Results 2013
mStoner.comHuronConsultingGroup.comCASE.orgThe Council for Advancement and Support ofEducation (CASE) is a professional as...
Overview• Fourth annual survey• Sponsors: CASE, Huron Consulting, mStoner• Method: survey mailed to 18,144 CASE members;tw...
DemographicsNational originNational originUS/Canada 89%International 11%Institutional typeInstitutional typePrivate 54%Pub...
Social media “traditions”• Top goals: engage alumni, strengthen brand image.• Most commonly used channels: Facebook, Twitt...
What’s new in 2013• SM is increasingly woven into campaigns,particularly for alumni engagement and brand/marketing campaig...
• Facebook still predominates, but the SM landscapeis diversifying, with channels such as Instagram andPinterest gaining s...
The ChangingLandscape
Audiences2013Growth orshrinkageAlumni 97% 2%Current Students 89% 20%Faculty and Staff 86% 20%Friends and Supporters 82% 1%P...
FacebookTwitterLinkedInYouTubeBlogsFlickrWeb.eduVendor communityHome-built communityGeosocialPinterestInstagramGoogle+Tumb...
Responding to options• Many recommend a thoughtful approach about whether to adoptnew social media channels:“Attempting to...
Responding to options• Respondents also caution that new tools mean a need for morededicated human resources:“Dont bite off...
For instance: Instagram• Early institutional adopters of Instagram report good results:“Students love our use of Instagram...
Website 90%Email 88%Social media 79%Blogging 27%SEO or search engine marketing 24%Internal publications 68%Direct print ma...
Social woven into campaigns20132012 4152Roughly what percentage of your campaigns*included social channels?*campaign define...
Social media infundraising
Social use in fundraisingDoes your institution use SM to raisemoney?20%39%41%yes no unsureDoes your institution use SM for...
Social use in fundraisingFor which types of development and fundraisingactivities does your institution use social media?K...
Most successful channelsMost successful forfundraising effortsMost successful for yourunits goals overallFacebook 80% 90%Tw...
Funds raised are small ...Approximately how much money did your institutionraise through social media channels in FY12?Up ...
Metrics
Donations are not primaryoutcomes for socialHow do you measure success for your SM activities?Outcome MeasuresRated in top...
Measuring ROI“It is difficult to measure ‘return on investment’ fromthe use of social media”2010201120122013 38333234
The benefit of metrics• Many of those who reported their social media initiatives havenot been successful noted that metri...
And of multiple metrics• Respondents note that having a wide array of measures, beyondnumber of followers or “likes,” is h...
Staffing
Greater time investmentMore work hours are being devoted to social mediathan last year. But: the change in number of emplo...
Barriers to success persist% who see this barrier in their unit “quite a bit” or “extensively 2013 2012Staffing for day-to-d...
Need for experienced staff• Many believe that lack of staff devoted to social media hampers theirsuccess and that they coul...
Harmonizing, if not centralizing• While the survey responses did not indicate that social media has become morecentralized...
Champion, expertise key tosuccess20102011201220138072616352“A champion is essential to the successful implementation of so...
Campaigns
www.bluevblue.com/#goetownbluemstnr.me/HGJb3HElizabethtown vs. Messiah, Battle of the Bluescase study: Case 19: “Embracing...
Thanks to Mike Nagel from Exeter AcademyGoal:To harness the deep connections lots of Exeter alums and current seniors have...
mstnr.me/X53TzzThe case study for “the Great Give” from SocialWorks is available here: mstnr.me/X53Tzz
FSU “Great Gifts” by info sourceDuring this campaign, the FSU annual giving team conducted a survey alongside the online g...
Cheryl Slover-Linett and Michael Stoner#SOCIALMEDIAAND ADVANCEMENT:INSIGHTS FROMTHREE YEARS OF DATAWhite Paper, 2012: #Soc...
Social Worksmstnr.me/TkXwLuSample Chapter[FSU “Great Give”]mstnr.me/X53TzzSocial Works: How #HigherEd Uses #SocialMedia to...
Michael Stonerpresident, mStonerMichael.Stoner@mStoner.com@mstonerblogmStoner.com/EDUniverse.orgCheryl Slover-LinettConsul...
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Initial Findings of CASE-Huron-mStoner Survey of Social Media in Advancement 2013

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This is the slide deck that Cheryl Slover-Linett, consultant with Huron Consulting, and Michael Stoner used in a presentation covering initial findings from the 2013 CASE-Huron-mStoner Survey of Social Media in Advancement. Presentation given at the CASE Social Media and Community Conference on 17 April 2013 in Cambridge, MA.

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Transcript of "Initial Findings of CASE-Huron-mStoner Survey of Social Media in Advancement 2013"

  1. 1. Social Media &Advancement:Results 2013
  2. 2. mStoner.comHuronConsultingGroup.comCASE.orgThe Council for Advancement and Support ofEducation (CASE) is a professional associationserving educational institutions and theadvancement professionals who work on theirbehalf in alumni relations, communications,development, marketing, and allied areas.mStoner is a marketing communicationsagency that works with education institutionson strategy and development of websites, socialmedia, brand, and print.
  3. 3. Overview• Fourth annual survey• Sponsors: CASE, Huron Consulting, mStoner• Method: survey mailed to 18,144 CASE members;tweeted by Michael Stoner and other mStoner teammembers• 1,080 response (a 6% response rate)Our initial survey, conducted in 2010, was thefirst large-scale attempt to research howeducation institutions used social media inexternal relations, marketing, andadvancement
  4. 4. DemographicsNational originNational originUS/Canada 89%International 11%Institutional typeInstitutional typePrivate 54%Public 45%(U.S. only) What type of institution do you work at?(U.S. only) What type of institution do you work at?Doctoral/research university 32%Baccalaureate (four-year) college 23%Master’s college or university 17%Independent elementary/secondary school 16%Associate’s (two-year) college 4%Other 8%Which best describes your unit (immediate department or division?Which best describes your unit (immediate department or division?Communications 45%Alumni Relations 38%Development (including Annual Fund) 36%Marketing 26%Advancement Services 22%Enrollment/Admissions 4%Other 10%Primarily U.S., but some international; split between public and private.The responses represent a demographic cross-section of CASE membership.Because most CASE members are fundraisers, institutional communicators(PR, media relations, marketing, publications, and periodicals), and alumnirelations professionals, that is the focus here (the views of enrollment andadmissions professionals are underrepresented).We collect this data so we can track differences from year to year to see if anyof the differences we see in the substantive data might be influenced bychanges here – and so far these demographics of respondents have beenconstant.
  5. 5. Social media “traditions”• Top goals: engage alumni, strengthen brand image.• Most commonly used channels: Facebook, Twitter,LinkedIn, and YouTube. But: year-over-year growth hasflattened, except for LinkedIn.• Management diversity: social media is centralized atsome institutions & highly dispersed at others. Thisdiversity of management shows no sign of diminishing.• Most (83%) departments handle their own social mediaactivities, usually with input from others.• Comms/PR depts. most likely responsible for creating,monitoring compliance with, & enforcing, institutionalSM policies (73%).
  6. 6. What’s new in 2013• SM is increasingly woven into campaigns,particularly for alumni engagement and brand/marketing campaigns.• The majority of respondents say their institutionuses SM for fundraising & development, often toupdate donors on institutional news, solicit annualfund donations, and thank donors. Facebookpredominates.• We use SM more commonly to connect withcurrent students & their parents, prospectivestudents & their parents, and faculty & staff.
  7. 7. • Facebook still predominates, but the SM landscapeis diversifying, with channels such as Instagram andPinterest gaining share of voice.• Use of Flickr and blogs declined, as did the use of aninstitutional website that aggregates social content.• More institutions are investing in SM as acommunication tool for higher education, asevidenced by increasing average FTE in this area.What’s new in 2013
  8. 8. The ChangingLandscape
  9. 9. Audiences2013Growth orshrinkageAlumni 97% 2%Current Students 89% 20%Faculty and Staff 86% 20%Friends and Supporters 82% 1%Prospective Students 74% 18%Donors 72% 2%Parents of Current Students 67% 16%Parents of Prospective Students 58% 13%Media 51% -2%Employers 42% 2%High School Guidance Counselors 31% 8%Government Organizations 25% 2%Use of social media is growing quickly for outreach tocertain audiences but it’s flat for othersAudiences:We saw much higher rates of use of at least one form of socialmedia to reach certain audiences:• current students and their parents• prospective students and their parents• and faculty and staffbut it’s flat for others: Media, Government Organizations,Employers, High School Guidance CounselorsSigns of recognizing where it is most welcome and rewarding?Note also: donors is flat. More on that to come.
  10. 10. FacebookTwitterLinkedInYouTubeBlogsFlickrWeb.eduVendor communityHome-built communityGeosocialPinterestInstagramGoogle+Tumblr-25 0 25 50 75 1000000-27-1-9-13-13-2720922272815203234384271758296% Use % GrowthChannel use/growthThis chart shows the percentage who say theyuse each social media channel (at all), and thelighter green shows how this has changed sincelast year.The lower section shows the social mediachannels we asked about this year for the firsttime.While Flickr shrinks, Instagram grows;Pinterest and Tumblr may be taking some ofthe share that Blogs held in the past
  11. 11. Responding to options• Many recommend a thoughtful approach about whether to adoptnew social media channels:“Attempting to be everywhere by jumping on the latest platform without a clearsense of purpose is wasted effort. This is a case where more is not better.”• A sense of how the platform connects with your audiences is key:“Research where your audience is, and survey where they want to see you! If noone is on Google+, then it is a waste of time to add this to your efforts.”“Targeting platform to audience—i.e. current students via Facebook, alumni viaLinkedIn and Twitter, integrating strategy and selecting what platforms makesense and what platforms not to utilize, dont be on all platforms in small ways,strategically select key platforms and focus resources on those few.”
  12. 12. Responding to options• Respondents also caution that new tools mean a need for morededicated human resources:“Dont bite off more than you can chew. If you cant dedicate personnel to managethe tool properly (e.g. answering @-replies on Twitter) then dont use the tool.”• However, one quick action may be necessary when a new channelappears:“Across four of our platforms—Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest—someone else owned our name. Our lesson learned is squat on your name on allplatforms. Even if you dont plan to do anything with it, you should own yourname.”But: “If you reserve it, youd better be ready for followers. We signed up for [ourname] on Twitter to hold it and suddenly found ourselves with 1200 followerswithout marketing our presence at all. We had to get a communication strategytogether, quickly.”
  13. 13. For instance: Instagram• Early institutional adopters of Instagram report good results:“Students love our use of Instagram and love when we ‘regram’ their photos.”“We had a very successful Instagram scavenger hunt as part of homecoming. Our goalwas 10 teams, but we had 22 teams of students and staff upload over 1500 photos toInstagram and generate a huge buzz on campus. This was the first time we leaned heavilyon Instagram, and found that it was welcomed by the campus community as a new socialplatform on which to engage.”• Careful planning helps to capitalize on a new channel’s inherent buzz:“When deploying a new platform/tool, think before you act. And pick your launch timewisely. For example: we launched Instagram with the beginning of the school year. Thiswas a great time to garner followers as the first years began and people were in the ‘freshstart’ mindset.”• Respondents also note advantages in the way Instagram fits in with existing tools:“Just try it! Last year, we launched our Instagram channel. To date, we have notpromoted it anywhere on our institutional website. It has only been promotedorganically via Twitter integration. However, our follower count has spiked and, moreimportantly, it has become one of our most engaging channels with an averageengagement rate of more than 7% per post.”Current students enjoy it.The wisdom in general is that you should beprepared to tailor yourself to each platform andnot recycle all the same material, butInstagram seems to be a bit of an exception:Low-hanging fruit in that it integratesrelatively well with other platforms.
  14. 14. Website 90%Email 88%Social media 79%Blogging 27%SEO or search engine marketing 24%Internal publications 68%Direct print mail 54%External publications (not your institution’s pubs) 22%Outreach and marketing at events 59%Radio 7%TV 5%Other 3%Promotion & marketingWe use mostly online tools to promote your socialmedia initiatives, but also many offline ones.Up 7%from 2012Up 4%from 2012
  15. 15. Social woven into campaigns20132012 4152Roughly what percentage of your campaigns*included social channels?*campaign defined as “a focused effort to achieve goals using a variety of channelsappropriate to the results sought”In the past two years we probed if (and how)institutions were using social media incampaigns, which wedefine as “a focused effort to achieve goalsusing a variety of channels appropriate to theresults sought.”Note that this definition can (and sometimesdoes) include efforts to raise money, but isintended to acknowledge that social media isoften incorporated into initiatives that haveobjectives other than just fundraising.
  16. 16. Social media infundraising
  17. 17. Social use in fundraisingDoes your institution use SM to raisemoney?20%39%41%yes no unsureDoes your institution use SM forstewardship or donor communication?18%47%35%yes no unsure
  18. 18. Social use in fundraisingFor which types of development and fundraisingactivities does your institution use social media?Keeping donors up to date on institution news 77%Annual fund solicitations 58%Thanking donors for their contributions 52%Keeping donors up to date on campaign orfundraising news49%Inviting donors to donor events 48%Annual fund follow-up reminders 30%Referring to or reminding about solicitationsreceived through non-social channels25%Capital campaign solicitations 14%Other 6%This year for the first time we asked a focusedset of questions on fundraising.So we see about half (of those who can speakconfidently on the subject) are using it to raisemoney or as part of donor stewardship.This provides our baseline, and we will beinterested to see if it increases over time, as wesaw for campaigns generally.
  19. 19. Most successful channelsMost successful forfundraising effortsMost successful for yourunits goals overallFacebook 80% 90%Twitter 34% 49%YouTube 18% 22%LinkedIn 15% 31%The top four most successful tools overall andfor fundraising efforts are the same, butrespondents are less confident of the successof the tools for fundraising at this point, andLinkedIn is notably less useful for fundraisingthan for overall goals.
  20. 20. Funds raised are small ...Approximately how much money did your institutionraise through social media channels in FY12?Up to $10,000 67%$10,001 – $50,000 21%$50,001 – $100,000 6%$100,001 or more 6%Relative to the sizes of the institutionsrepresented here and how much they raiseoverall, however…But, donations are not a primary outcome forsocial media, as we’ll see in a minute.
  21. 21. Metrics
  22. 22. Donations are not primaryoutcomes for socialHow do you measure success for your SM activities?Outcome MeasuresRated in top two(quite a bit/extensively)Number of active “friends,” "likes" 73%Volume of participation 57%Number of “click-throughs” to your website 53%Event participation 40%Anecdotal success (or horror) stories 26%Penetration measure of use among target audience 19%Volume or proportion of complaints and negativecomments 12%Donations 15%Number of applications for admission 10%Surveys of target audiences 9%You see that donations are pretty low on the list of ways thatCASE members typically gauge their success in social media.We are looking at mean ratings on a scale from 1 to 5 where 5means it is used extensively.Top metrics are• Number of active “friends,” “likes”• Volume of participation• Number of “click-throughs” to your website, but the fieldis pretty wide.Perhaps it needs to be even wider, or more precise, because thesense of difficult in ROI is, if anything, growing over time.
  23. 23. Measuring ROI“It is difficult to measure ‘return on investment’ fromthe use of social media”2010201120122013 38333234
  24. 24. The benefit of metrics• Many of those who reported their social media initiatives havenot been successful noted that metrics were lacking.• By contrast, those who report their social media use has been verysuccessful also say they have robust tracking mechanisms:“We’ve created a weekly dashboard of target metrics for all of our socialplatforms and our main websites that shows changes and topics thatresonated. This has greatly elevated awareness of our efforts amonguniversity leadership.”“We don’t think, we know. Calculations and reports are submitted monthlyon SoMe successes and returns, both subjective and objective. We’veboosted ticket sales to events, recruited students, and increased awarenessabout many different things.”We have a question on the survey that asks respondents toevaluate themselves on how successful they have been intheir use of social media, and why. We see a relationshipwhere those who say they were most successful also talkabout a dashboard of metrics that they look at weekly ormonthly.Were they able to achieve success because they weretracking what worked and then did more of that, so themetrics enable success? Or is it that they can speakconfidently of their success because they have themetrics? We heard the comment “we don’t think, weknow,” which is certainly a satisfying thing.
  25. 25. And of multiple metrics• Respondents note that having a wide array of measures, beyondnumber of followers or “likes,” is helpful to seeing the biggerpicture. In particular, achieving a true conversation can be hardto measure:“Due to the changing nature of technology and the preferences for its use, goalsfor social media often feel like moving targets. Whats important in terms ofmetrics one day, may not be the case the following day. Ex. One of our departmentgoals is related to direct engagement with posts. Weve seen actual typedfeedback fall away in favor of the one click ‘likes.’ Is direct engagement via typedfeedback becoming a thing of the past, or are there new methods/suggestions(beyond open ended questions) that truly prompt dialogue?”“When students start using your page for their own conversations ... you knowyouve hit success!”“In the last two years, social media has been overhauled from stagnant andsporadic event promotion to planned content planning with plenty of time forlistening. It has really become a conversation—key for alumni relations.”We heard some say that having as many metrics as you can is helpful,because you don’t know over the long run which ones will be mostrelevant and revealing.This long quotation here is pointing out a trend of fewer comments butplenty of “likes” and the question is whether he or she should beworried. We heard some respondents thinking about whether “likes”are too discrete and we should be interested in how long a thread goesand whether it becomes a genuine conversation.On the side I’ll also note that several people brought up that negativecomments are also an opportunity, and that they are most important torespond to.
  26. 26. Staffing
  27. 27. Greater time investmentMore work hours are being devoted to social mediathan last year. But: the change in number of employeesworking on social media was flat this year.At the institution level:• 34% have social media FTE between 0 and 1, up from 24%last year.• The proportion with 0 FTE is down to 5% from 9% lastyear.At the unit level:• 62% have social media FTE between 0 and 1, up from 45%last year.• The proportion with 0 FTE is down to 7% from 17% lastyear.The number of staff who have someinvolvement with social media is similar towhat we saw last year, but the (FTE) full timeequivalency is higher. Institutions areincreasing FTE rather than increasing staffing,which is a more conservative way to growinvolvement in social media. The biggest areaof increase is in number of respondents whor.eport that their unit or institution has at leastone person working on social media, but lessthan 1 FTE
  28. 28. Barriers to success persist% who see this barrier in their unit “quite a bit” or “extensively 2013 2012Staffing for day-to-day content management 55% 49%Staffing for site development 44% 42%Lack of relevant human resources in my unit 40% 37%Slow pace of change 31% 22%Expertise in how to implement it 25% 23%Funding 26% 22%Lack of IT resources 22% 20%Lack of institutional clarity about who is responsiblefor social media initiatives22% 20%Concerns about loss of control over content and toneof postings by others19% 17%Lack of commitment by decision-makers 19% 17%
  29. 29. Need for experienced staff• Many believe that lack of staff devoted to social media hampers theirsuccess and that they could improve with help from ... “Dedicated staffperson(s). Currently this responsibility is an add-on to current staffpositions and responsibilities . . . .”• There are advantages to concentrating social media duties in fewerstaff people with greater expertise and sense of the big picture:“I think we could do more to collaborate with other campus departments. In addition,our small staff . . . does not allow for social media to be an explicit part of someones jobdescription. If someone was able to focus on it day in day out, we would be prettyamazing at it. As it stands now, we all collectively try to post when we can.”“We do not have in-house expertise to help establish strategic initiatives or to ensure ourmessages are consistent and aligned with other University messaging.”“At our level (a college within a large university) we have been very successful becausewe hired someone with solid social media experience who is in charge of all of our socialmedia outlets. This person has set clear goals and has integrated social media into themajority of our campaigns.”In open-end responses, we heard that this add-on method has its detractors. There is anargument to be made for a concentrating socialmedia expertise in staff members who are moreexpert and more dedicated to social media asopposed to adding it on to the duties of manystaff members in many units. So there is somecall for collaboration between units to poolhuman resources on social media.
  30. 30. Harmonizing, if not centralizing• While the survey responses did not indicate that social media has become morecentralized in its institutional use, some think that it should be. They advise:“Centralize efforts instead of individual development units/officers creating their own Facebookpages and campaigns.”“Do not allow unlimited numbers of entities on a social media channel (in our case Facebook) todilute your brand. External audiences need to be able to find the official institutional page quickly.”• We also see suggestions of other ways to reduce fragmentation without makingsocial media usage highly centralized or top-down:“We would like for more cross promotion throughout the university, from other areas/units thanour own, and also from the central administration. It would also be useful with closer teamworkwith other units in terms of promoting and/or creating relevant content.”“We are a decentralized university and all 12 schools, as well as most of the 24 departments, all aremanaging a social media strategy. We have done an outstanding job of centralizing an otherwisedecentralized voice. Our most effective tool has been using Facebook Groups as a vehicle fordriving messaging from all of the disparate groups, upward to the main university profilemanagers. Every day, anyone within the university can post their top stories to the internal groupand have a very strong chance of having their story posted that day, or the next on the universitiesmain profiles.”Some say social media should be staffed in amore centralized way to help with moreconsistent and strategic messaging.We have a survey question that asks directlyhow centralized or dispersed social media is,on a 6-points scale, and we see answers all overthe map, but the largest number (30%) say it iscompletely dispersed.
  31. 31. Champion, expertise key tosuccess20102011201220138072616352“A champion is essential to the successful implementation of socialmedia in our institution”“Expertise to help our social media efforts is readily available”2010201120122013 34312826I will end with this final look at some keys to socialmedia success. In light of the comments we lookedat in the last couple slides on the importance ofexpertise, it is heartening to see that the sense thatexpertise is available has increased over time.I find it somewhat unexpected that the sense that achampion is essential to success of social mediahas only increased over time. But let it be achallenge to any of you in the audience who mightlike to take up that mantle: you are needed.
  32. 32. Campaigns
  33. 33. www.bluevblue.com/#goetownbluemstnr.me/HGJb3HElizabethtown vs. Messiah, Battle of the Bluescase study: Case 19: “Embracing Rivalry to Increase Annual Fund Participation,” Social Works (mstnr.me/TkXwLu)In the fall of 2011, Elizabethtown College and Messiah College took a long-standing rivalry from the soccer field to the annual fund campaign through a giving challenge between young alumni—or those that have graduated within the last ten years—calledBattle of the Blues.The campaign, which pitted young alumni of the two colleges against one another to tally the highest participation rate, launched in July 2011 and wrapped up on October 31, 2011. The E-town Blue Jays came out on top a participation rate of 7.85%; Messiahchecked in at a close 7.72%.In addition to emails and direct mail, the web and social media was used to heavily promote the giving challenge. First, a dedicated website, www.bluevblue.com was created; this site included details of the challenge, linked to donation forms, and also, eachMonday during the competition, updated the current standings. Second, special Twitter hashtags were created to create buzz, provide a mechanism for participants to let their friends and followers know they gave and, of course, to encourage friendly trash-talking between the two colleges. Additionally, the Battle of the Blues website pulled in the Twitter feed from each college’s designated hashtag: #goetownblue or #gomessiahblue.Staff members from both College’s marketing and development offices also used the hashtag to inform those who may be on Twitter of the campaign’s progress and to “egg-on” or entice their young alums to respond and, most importantly, make a gift. Finally,E-town produced several short videos—mostly humorous in nature—to promote the contest. These videos were shared via email messages, Twitter and Facebook.But it wasn’t just an online campaign; Battle of the Blues also had some face-to-face time with alumni through a table at the Oktoberfest tent during the Elizabethtown College Homecoming and Family Weekend. The winning team was announced during thefamous, annual soccer game between the archrivals. Will there be a rematch?
  34. 34. Thanks to Mike Nagel from Exeter AcademyGoal:To harness the deep connections lots of Exeter alums and current seniors have with their dorms, and turn that good energy into donations to the Exeter Fund. The dorm withthe largest percentage of the giving from that week, wins.Important fact:Exeter has the benefit of having 600 class agents across the country - alumni who are tasked with encouraging fundraising from the members of their individual classes eachyear. Mike Nagel, Exeter’s associate director of advancement communications, worked with his colleagues to mobilize class agents and other alumni around the Big Red DormChallenge - resulting in an ‘avalanche of asks’ (and hopefully lots of giving, too) during the week of the Challenge! The Senior Class Gift Committee was also instrumental inspreading the word.Background:* Big Red Dorm Challenge started in 2011, making the 2013 Challenge the Third Big Red Dorm Challenge.* This year, the Challenge lasted one week, Feb. 25 through March 3.* From the first hour of the first day, class agents and other alumni got the word out rapid-fire - mainly through Facebook posts. Email and Twitter were used also, though notnearly as effective in the Challenge as Facebook.* The primary objective that week, was to use posts to drive traffic to the online giving form on Exeter’s website.* Regular score updates on Facebook helped keep people engaged...and competing!* Alumni from 1970 to 2012 and the current senior class participated.* Mike Nagel: “We encourage alumni to go out and post on Facebook, and we post on Facebook as well.”Results:* During the week of Feb. 25- March 3, the Challenge drove more than 15 percent of Exeter’s web traffic to the ‘Challenge page’ and more than 70 users to the giving form.* In one week, Exeter received 275 gifts from the classes of 1970-2012.* In one week, Exeter received 192 gifts from the current senior class - and we should note that in one week, the Class of 2013 went from less than 10 percent participation toover 55 percent of the class participating in giving.* Large increase in traffic to the Exeter Alumni Facebook page, as well.
  35. 35. mstnr.me/X53TzzThe case study for “the Great Give” from SocialWorks is available here: mstnr.me/X53Tzz
  36. 36. FSU “Great Gifts” by info sourceDuring this campaign, the FSU annual giving team conducted a survey alongside the online giving process. After thegift was secured, they asked the donor, “How did you hear about the Great Give?” The largest response was word ofmouth, with 57 percent of all donors saying that was how they learned about the Great Give. Second was email, with a31 percent response. Considerably further down the list was Facebook and FSU websites, at just 2 percent each. That’sroughly equal to the response rate of direct mail. But Warren doesn’t see social media as ineffective; his hunch is thatthose numbers reflect a change in the definition of word of mouth.“You’re communicating and promoting it, but is it through a chat or through a text message or through an email?”Warren thinks a large number of those who reported “word of mouth” were actually thinking about conversations theyhad via text message or a post they saw on a friend’s or family member’s Facebook wall. Again, online ambassadorswere a big factor in the success of the Great Give, and they weren’t sharing their updates by going door-to-door toeveryone they knew. They were sharing news of the campaign through social network status updates provided by theFSU annual giving team.
  37. 37. Cheryl Slover-Linett and Michael Stoner#SOCIALMEDIAAND ADVANCEMENT:INSIGHTS FROMTHREE YEARS OF DATAWhite Paper, 2012: #SocialMedia & Advancementmstnr.me/TpQPTv
  38. 38. Social Worksmstnr.me/TkXwLuSample Chapter[FSU “Great Give”]mstnr.me/X53TzzSocial Works: How #HigherEd Uses #SocialMedia to Raise Money, Build Awareness, Recruit Students, and GetResults is unique. The 25 case studies in Social Works demonstrate that social media has the maturity andreach to be an integral component of campaigns focused on building awareness, recruiting students, engagingalumni and other key audiences, raising money, and accomplishing important goals that matter to a college oruniversity. The case studies in Social Works will inspire college and university communicators, marketers, web teammembers, and other staff, offering models and details for highly successful initiatives. And, they will convincepresidents and other senior leaders that social media is not just valuable, but essential, to achievinginstitutional goals. In short, Social Works belongs on the shelves (or on the e-readers) of college and universitystaff who want to learn how to get results with social media. Published 25 February 2013 by EDUniverseMedia.
  39. 39. Michael Stonerpresident, mStonerMichael.Stoner@mStoner.com@mstonerblogmStoner.com/EDUniverse.orgCheryl Slover-LinettConsultantHigher Education Constituent ResearchHuron Consultingcsloverlinett-c@huronconsultinggroup.com+1 505.820.7256Contact

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