Maryland Technology Literacy Project <ul><li>MICCA Business Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>November 5, 2008 </li></ul>
Technology Goal of  No Child Left Behind <ul><li>To assist every student in crossing the digital divide by ensuring that e...
Compelling Need for New Data Collection <ul><li>MSDE has collected data on technology in Maryland schools since 1996. </li...
Compelling Need for New Data Collection <ul><li>Local school system superintendents have requested that there be one consi...
The Maryland Measure of Student Technology Literacy (MMSTL)
MMSTL Background <ul><li>The Maryland Measure of Student Technology Literacy (MMSTL) was researched and evaluated by the M...
MMSTL Administration <ul><li>All seventh grade students will take the Maryland Measure of Student Technology Literacy (MMS...
MMSTL Results <ul><li>Student results are reported as “proficient” or “not proficient.” </li></ul><ul><li>This measurement...
MMSTL Tool <ul><li>Questions on student access and practice are included at the beginning of the measurement  –  as reques...
 
Teacher & Administrator Technology Literacy Measurements
Teacher and Administrator Technology Measurements <ul><li>At the same time, MSDE has been developing the Maryland Technolo...
Teacher and Administrator Technology Measurements <ul><li>Grant awarded to Baltimore County Public Schools to establish a ...
Grant Leadership <ul><li>Thea Jones, Baltimore County Pubic Schools, Grant Director </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Judith Tomelden ...
Grant Advisory Committee <ul><li>Ron Beazer – Baltimore City Public Schools Janey Mayo – Harford County Public Schools Ste...
Teacher Technology Measurement <ul><li>Two 30-item forms were constructed, using items created and piloted by a previous f...
Sample Item A visually impaired student received accommodations, such as larger printed texts and modified reading excerpt...
Teacher Inventory Pilot <ul><li>195 teachers and library media specialists participated in the online pilot this past summ...
Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators <ul><li>I.  LEADERSHIP AND VISION  </li></ul><ul><li>A school admi...
Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators <ul><li>IV. MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS  </li></ul><ul><li>A school ...
School-based Administrator Inventory <ul><li>Indicators from the  Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators ...
School-based Administrator Inventory Pilot <ul><li>33  school-based administrators participated in a pilot this past summe...
Reflection Page for Administrators   Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 6 Leadership & Vision...
Administration <ul><li>Local school systems will administer inventories online to a random sample of teachers, library med...
How data can be used… <ul><li>Teachers, library media specialists, and school-based administrators can use the results in ...
Next Steps <ul><ul><li>Superintendents were asked for a Primary Contact and Planning Team. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trai...
Maryland Technology Literacy Project QUESTIONS?
Contact Information <ul><li>Jayne Moore, Director </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Technology & School Library Media </li><...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Technology Literacy Project Micca 110508

700

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
700
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Technology Literacy Project Micca 110508

    1. 1. Maryland Technology Literacy Project <ul><li>MICCA Business Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>November 5, 2008 </li></ul>
    2. 2. Technology Goal of No Child Left Behind <ul><li>To assist every student in crossing the digital divide by ensuring that every student is technologically literate by the time the student finishes the eighth grade, regardless of the student's race, ethnicity, gender, family income, geographic location, or disability </li></ul>
    3. 3. Compelling Need for New Data Collection <ul><li>MSDE has collected data on technology in Maryland schools since 1996. </li></ul><ul><li>Data on student, teacher, and administrator knowledge and skills have been static and one-dimensional. </li></ul><ul><li>MSDE must report the number of students, teachers ,and school-based administrators who are technology literate by 2009, as required by No Child Left Behind. </li></ul><ul><li>The updated Maryland Educational Technology Plan for the New Millennium: 2007 – 2112 calls for a more robust form of assessment related to teacher and administrator standards to identify areas of need for professional development </li></ul>
    4. 4. Compelling Need for New Data Collection <ul><li>Local school system superintendents have requested that there be one consistent measure (OCM) for the State. </li></ul><ul><li>The Maryland Technology Literacy Project is an instructional initiative, rather than an assessment project. </li></ul><ul><li>Data will give Maryland a better picture of where we are with technology integration. </li></ul><ul><li>Data will help to inform professional development needed to achieve technology within local school systems. </li></ul>
    5. 5. The Maryland Measure of Student Technology Literacy (MMSTL)
    6. 6. MMSTL Background <ul><li>The Maryland Measure of Student Technology Literacy (MMSTL) was researched and evaluated by the Maryland Technology Literacy Consortium (TLC), which is comprised of all 24 local education agencies. </li></ul><ul><li>The Consortium previously developed Maryland’s definition of student technology literacy and the Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students (MTLSS) , which will be used to measure students’ technology literacy. </li></ul>
    7. 7. MMSTL Administration <ul><li>All seventh grade students will take the Maryland Measure of Student Technology Literacy (MMSTL). Local Superintendents were consulted in making the decision. </li></ul><ul><li>The window for the MMSTL administration is December 1, 2008, through January 16, 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>The MMSTL is an online tool accessed through a Web-browser. </li></ul><ul><li>The data collected this year is baseline data. </li></ul>
    8. 8. MMSTL Results <ul><li>Student results are reported as “proficient” or “not proficient.” </li></ul><ul><li>This measurement does not affect Annual Yearly Progress. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools will be able to see results within 48 hours of the completion of the measurement. </li></ul><ul><li>Student data will be available to school systems, with results being reported to the USDOE by school. </li></ul>
    9. 9. MMSTL Tool <ul><li>Questions on student access and practice are included at the beginning of the measurement – as requested by Superintendents. </li></ul><ul><li>Each local school system selected one classroom in one middle school to field test the measurement in October. </li></ul><ul><li>The measurement tool is designed to be completed in one 40-minute class period. </li></ul><ul><li>The MMSTL is a combination of selected response and performance-based questions. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A sample can be viewed at: http:// www.learning.com/help/md / </li></ul></ul>
    10. 11. Teacher & Administrator Technology Literacy Measurements
    11. 12. Teacher and Administrator Technology Measurements <ul><li>At the same time, MSDE has been developing the Maryland Technology Literacy Measurement for teachers and another for administrators, based on the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards (MTTS) and the Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators (MTSSA) . </li></ul>
    12. 13. Teacher and Administrator Technology Measurements <ul><li>Grant awarded to Baltimore County Public Schools to establish a practical and feasible way to gather data on teacher and school-based administrator technology literacy to meet federal requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>A statewide advisory was formed to guide the work. </li></ul>
    13. 14. Grant Leadership <ul><li>Thea Jones, Baltimore County Pubic Schools, Grant Director </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Judith Tomelden – Retired, Prince George’s County Public Schools, Project Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Marlene Johnson, MSDE, Grant Monitor </li></ul><ul><li>Jayne Moore, MSDE, Director </li></ul><ul><li>Tim Hontz – Carroll County Public Schools, Technical Support </li></ul><ul><li>Barbara Reeves – Retired, MSDE, Grant Consultant </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Gail Goldberg – Retired, MSDE – Research Consultant </li></ul><ul><li>Edith Stevens – Macro International, Grant Evaluator </li></ul><ul><li>Shauna Clarke – Macro International, Grant Evaluator </li></ul>
    14. 15. Grant Advisory Committee <ul><li>Ron Beazer – Baltimore City Public Schools Janey Mayo – Harford County Public Schools Sterlind Burke – Howard County Public Schools Liz Neal – MSDE Dr. John Castellani – Johns Hopkins University Debbie Ray – Anne Arundel County Public Schools Carla Hurchalla – Wicomico County Public Schools Rick Robb – Howard County Public Schools Jill Keating – Allegany County Public Schools Paula Sandridge – Carroll County Public Schools Julie Kimball – Dorchester County Public Schools Kalani Smith – Montgomery County Public Schools Joanne Laskowski – Talbot County Public Schools Chris Voelker – Calvert County Public Schools Valerie Low – Prince George’s County Public Schools Melissa Woods – Montgomery County Public Schools </li></ul>
    15. 16. Teacher Technology Measurement <ul><li>Two 30-item forms were constructed, using items created and piloted by a previous federal grant. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions are based on the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards . </li></ul><ul><li>Two forms will be rotated from year to year. </li></ul>
    16. 17. Sample Item A visually impaired student received accommodations, such as larger printed texts and modified reading excerpts. Unfortunately, these accommodations were not effective. The teacher decided to take a look at other assistive technologies to help the student. Which of the items below would be most effective for the above-mentioned student? A. Scanning/Reading technology B. Screen magnification C. Screen readers D. Braille displays -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A is the correct response because the Scanning/Reading technologies provide two services. First, by scanning in any of the material will enlarge text and objects for the reader. In addition, it will also read aloud information to the student.
    17. 18. Teacher Inventory Pilot <ul><li>195 teachers and library media specialists participated in the online pilot this past summer. </li></ul><ul><li>Each person received a raw score that reflected the number of correct responses for each standard. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluators determined the cut score to be considered “technology proficient” was 19 out of 30. </li></ul><ul><li>Cut score was based on an overall score and did not require an individual to be proficient on all standards or a subset of all standards. </li></ul>
    18. 19. Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators <ul><li>I. LEADERSHIP AND VISION </li></ul><ul><li>A school administrator inspires a shared vision for the comprehensive integration of technology into the work of the school and fosters an environment and culture conducive to the realization of that vision. </li></ul><ul><li>II. TEACHING AND LEARNING </li></ul><ul><li>A school administrator ensures the integration of appropriate technologies in instruction and learning environments to maximize student achievement. </li></ul><ul><li>II. DATA-DRIVEN DECISION MAKING </li></ul><ul><li>A school administrator uses technology to access and analyze multiple sources of data to make decisions affecting the development and implementation of the School Improvement Plan. </li></ul>
    19. 20. Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators <ul><li>IV. MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>A school administrator supports the use of technology for the management and operations of the school. </li></ul><ul><li>V. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE AND PRODUCTIVITY </li></ul><ul><li>A school administrator uses technology to enhance professional practice and to increase personal productivity. </li></ul><ul><li>VI. SOCIAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL ISSUES </li></ul><ul><li>A school administrator understands the social, legal, and ethical issues related to technology use and ensures responsible adherence to acceptable practices. </li></ul><ul><li>The Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators were adapted from ISTE NETS-A; informed by the Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework ; aligned with the Maryland Teacher Professional Development Standards ; developed by the Maryland Online Technology Profile for Administrators and Teachers Consortium , a federal Title II-D Partnership Grant; and accepted by the Maryland State Board of Education, April 24, 2007. These standards have been designed to support school-based administrators as they work to use technology effectively in all aspects of the administration of their schools. </li></ul>
    20. 21. School-based Administrator Inventory <ul><li>Indicators from the Maryland Technology Standards for School Administrators were converted into self-assessment questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus group of administrators reacted favorably to the format and the questions this past summer. </li></ul>
    21. 22. School-based Administrator Inventory Pilot <ul><li>33 school-based administrators participated in a pilot this past summer. Each received a raw score that reflected the number of correct responses for each standard. </li></ul><ul><li>The cut score to be considered “technology proficient” was 81 out of 108. </li></ul><ul><li>Cut score was based on an overall score and did not require an individual to be proficient on all standards or a subset of all standards. </li></ul>
    22. 23. Reflection Page for Administrators Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 6 Leadership & Vision Teaching & Learning Data Driven Decision Making Management & Operations Professional Practice & Productivity Social, Legal, & Ethical Issues My score My score My score My score My score My score Reflection Reflection Reflection Reflection Reflection Reflection Next Steps Next Steps Next Steps Next Steps Next Steps Next Steps Timeline Timeline Timeline Timeline Timeline Timeline
    23. 24. Administration <ul><li>Local school systems will administer inventories online to a random sample of teachers, library media specialists, and school-based administrators in spring 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Working with ORC MACRO International to develop the sampling plan </li></ul>
    24. 25. How data can be used… <ul><li>Teachers, library media specialists, and school-based administrators can use the results in planning their professional growth activities related to the use of instructional technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Local school systems can use the results as they plan professional development activities . . . to include appropriate technology integration . </li></ul>
    25. 26. Next Steps <ul><ul><li>Superintendents were asked for a Primary Contact and Planning Team. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training dates have been established. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weekly conference calls have been established for the MMSTL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A website has been developed for MMSTL implementation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A web plan is in development for implementation of the teacher and administrator measurements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plans are being developed for data analysis, dissemination, follow-up (e.g., resources for professional development). </li></ul></ul>
    26. 27. Maryland Technology Literacy Project QUESTIONS?
    27. 28. Contact Information <ul><li>Jayne Moore, Director </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Technology & School Library Media </li></ul><ul><li>Division of Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Maryland State Department of Education </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>(410) 767-0382 </li></ul>
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×