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Biol 11 Lesson 1 Mar 2  - Ch. 27 Mollusca
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Biol 11 Lesson 1 Mar 2 - Ch. 27 Mollusca

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Biology 11 …

Biology 11
Animal Biology unit - Invertebrates
Miller, K.R. & Levine, J. (2000). Biology (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
Ch. 27: Mollusks and Annelids
pp. 584-593

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  • 1. Homework from last class:
    • Read Ch. 27-1 Mollusks
    • Read over class notes and check out the class blog: http://msoonscience.blogspot.com/
  • 2. Phylum Mollusca: Mollusks Chapter 27: Mollusks and Annelids pp. 584-593
  • 3.  
  • 4.
    • Biology fun facts of the day:
    Experts claim that about 1,000 oysters must be opened in order to find one usable pearl!
  • 5.
    • Biology fun facts of the day:
    The common garden snail, Helix aspersa, can travel about 2 feet in 3 minutes. At that rate, it would travel 1 mile in 5.5 days. (Now you know where the term ‘snail mail’ comes from!)
  • 6.
    • Biology fun facts of the day:
    When we hold a large seashell up to our ear, you can hear what sounds like waves because the shell echoes all the sounds around you. If you could listen to a shell in a completely soundproof room, you would hear nothing at all!
  • 7.
    • Biology fun facts of the day:
    Many land snails can lift 10 times their own weight up a vertical surface. (If you were this strong, and you weighed 30 kg (about 70 lb), you could carry 300 kg (almost 700 pounds!!!) straight up a wall!
  • 8. Introduction to Mollusks
    • Phylum Mollusca – Latin molluscus = “soft”
    • Bilateral symmetry
    • 3 cell layers (ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm)
    • Have a coelom (but often reduced to a cavity that surrounds only the heart)
    • Have trochophore larvae (free-swimming ciliated larva)
      • Similar larvae in annelids 
      • likely share a common ancestor
  • 9. Introduction to Mollusks
    • Mollusks all share similar developmental patterns and a common body plan:
    • Foot (muscle; function varies)
    • Shell (protection; made of CaCO 3 )
    • Mantle (produces the shell)
    • Visceral mass (contains internal organs)
    Diagrams of snail, clam, and squid p. 586
  • 10. Classes of Mollusks
    • 1) Class Bivalvia
      • 2 hinged shells
      • No head or eyes
      • Gills; live in water
      • Example members: clams, oysters, scallops
      • 2) Class Gastropoda
      • One shell
      • Some are terrestrial
      • Example members: snails, slugs, nudibranchs
  • 11. Classes of Mollusks
    • 3) Class Cephalopoda
    • Fast-moving predators
    • Foot is modified into tentacles
    • Well-developed nervous system
    • Some can use camouflage and jet propulsion (e.g. octopus) when they feel threatened
    • Example members: octopus, squid, nautilus, cuttlefish
    Octopus Nautilus Squid
  • 12. Form and Function of Mollusks
        • Mollusks vary a lot  clam = representative mollusk
        • Digestive system:
        • Complete digestive tract (mouth  anus)
          • Mouth, esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus
        • Have a radula (scraping/drilling organ) or a beak (cephalopods)
        • Bivalves trap food in their gills – no radula
    e.g. Gastropod
  • 13. Form and Function of Mollusks
        • Respiratory system:
        • Aquatic mollusks have gills
        • Terrestrial mollusks have a highly folded mantle for O 2 /CO 2 exchange (must stay moist)
        • *A clam has incurrent and excurrent siphons  sea water passes through; location of gas exchange
  • 14.
        • Circulatory system:
        • Open circulatory system – the heart pumps blood through open spaces called sinuses instead of through blood vessels
        • Excretory system:
        • Nephridia (primitive kidneys) remove metabolic waste (nitrogen-containing wastes like NH 3 )
        • Digestive wastes go out anus
  • 15.
        • Nervous system:
        • Bivalves – reduced nervous system; no head
        • Gastropods – fairly basic
        • Cephalopods – very well developed
          • Good vision, small ganglia near mouth, statocysts (balance), simple chemical and touch receptors
          • Good dexterity and memory – they can learn!
  • 16.
        • Musculoskeletal system:
        • Muscular foot for movement
        • Bivalves – “two shell” ; foot pulls animal forward , and can be sucked back in (for protection)
        • Gastropods – “stomach foot” ; they slide forward on broad ventral foot (use muscus)
        • Cephalopods – “head foot” ; foot has been modified into many tentacles with suction cups
    e.g. Gastropod
  • 17.  
  • 18. Ecology of Mollusks
    • Bivalves used to check pollution levels – “environmental monitors”
    • Range of lifestyles: predators, scavengers, filter feeders, etc.
    • Crop damage – slugs, snails on land
    • Ship damage – shipworms in water
    • Food source for humans: clams, oysters, mussels, etc.
      • Humans can get poisoned by eating mollusks contaminated with toxic protists  cause “red tide”
  • 19. Video – “Mollusks”
  • 20. Homework for next class:
    • Complete Ch. 27 Phylum Mollusca worksheet
    • Colour Mollusca (clam) diagram – include a legend
    • e.g. Excretory
    • Circulatory
    • Study for Mollusca quiz!
    • Read over class notes and check out the class blog: http://msoonscience.blogspot.com/
  • 21. Works Cited
    • Images taken from the following sources:
    • http://other95.blogspot.com/2007/10/circus-of-spineless-26-like-being-home.html
    • http://offthemark.com/search-results/key/mollusk/
    • http://kevinmainjewelry.blogspot.com/2010/06/pearl-fun-facts-and-care-tips.html
    • http://seashellvilla.com/advertise_here.html
    • http://www.zazzle.com/snail_mail_postcard-239469706654312651
    • http://bio1151b.nicerweb.com/Locked/media/ch32/trochophore.html
    • http://www.education.com/study-help/article/biology-help-mollusks-clam-up-would-ya/
  • 22. Works Cited
    • http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCESearchMedia&Params=A1&MediaId=385
    • http://perfectgardeningtips.com/category/plants/pest-control/
    • http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/sf/insects-pests/slugs-082896
    • http://birdhouse.org/blog/2008/05/16/nudibranchs/
    • http://www.zazzle.com/i_squid_cephalopods_tshirt-235319078835508111
    • https://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/58856
    • http://radio-weblogs.com/0105910/2004/01/10.html
    • http://ihatetheocean.blogspot.com/2010/08/august-6-2010-nautilus.html
    • http://zollberg.co.cc/bivalve.html
  • 23. Works Cited
    • http://js082.k12.sd.us/My_Classes/Advanced_Biology/Ch_25/Clam%20Dissection/Clam_Dissection.htm
    • http://www.sciencewithme.com/learn-about-mollusks/
    • http://www.bio.miami.edu/dana/106/106F06_12.html
    • http://nashzoology.ning.com/forum/topics/mollusk-classification-choose?commentId=2223964%3AComment%3A10692&xg_source=activity
    • http://sharon-taxonomy2009-p3.wikispaces.com/Mollusca
    • http://www.lifeinfreshwater.org.uk/Web%20pages/ponds/Pollution.htm
    • http://www.nero.noaa.gov/nero/hotnews/redtide/
    • http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/content/animals/profile_mollusks.htm