ACHIEVE Healthier
Communities
Centers for Disease Control
Grant Results
ACHIEVE
Action Communities for Health,
Innovation and EnVironmental ChangE
CHART
Community Health Action Response Team
Grand Forks (GF) Park District
GF Health Department
GF Public Schools
GF, EGF ...
CHANGE
Community Health Assessment aNd Group Evaluation

• Change Tool
– Snapshot of local policy, system, and
environment...
New Logo
Goals
•
•
•
•
•

Healthy Concession Stands
Healthy Restaurants
Children’s Community Gardens
EBT Machines for Farmers Marke...
Healthy Concession Stands
Partners:
• Park District
• NDSU Extension Service
• GF Public Schools
– Boosters
– Superintende...
Concession Stands: Park District
Decreased to 5 candy
bar choices
– “healthier”, lower
calorie,
•
•
•
•
•

Three Muskateer...
Park District Concession Stands
New items
• granola
• yogurt
• applesauce
• mandarin orange cups
• vitamin waters
• teas
•...
Healthy Restaurant Initiative
Partners:
• Park District
• NDSU Extension Service
• GF Public Health
• GF Public Schools
• ...
Food Group Definitions
Healthy Menu Items
Nutritionally Dense
Food Focus
•

Whole grain breads,

• Fruit: ½ cup min.
(Fres...
The Take Action logo may be used on menus if the
following nutrition criteria are met for adults.
.
Full Meal (entrée, sid...
The Take Action logo may be used on menus
if the following criteria are met for children.
Full Meal (entrée, side
option a...
Nutrition Criteria for Kids’ Meals
Full Meal (entrée, side option
and beverage):

600 calories or less
• ≤30% of calories ...
Rosemary Roasted Potatoes
1 pound small, red potatoes
2 Tbsp. olive oil
½ tsp. crushed, dried rosemary
½ tsp. salt
Preheat...
EBT Machines at Farmer’s Markets
Partners:
• Park District
• GF Public Health
• State Department of Health
• Choice Health and Fitness: Sprouts Deli
serves healthy foods.
– Monster cookies made with apple sauce
– Nothing fried
– ...
EBT Machines at Farmer’s Markets
•
•

•

•
•

•
•
•

Bismarck
BisMarket Farmers Market
Saturdays - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
...
First Steps
Get an FCN number
• Can be a lengthy process
• Can accept debit and
credit cards.
• http://www.fns.usda.gov/s
...
Goals
Farmer’s Markets
Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) Machines
Partners:
• Park District
• GF Department of Health
• U...
Children’s Gardens
Partners:
• Park District
• NDSU Extension Service
• GF Public Schools
• US Green Building Council
• Ry...
Century School Garden
Century School Garden
Century School Garden
School Orchard
Lake Agassiz School Garden
Tobacco-Free Parks
• Park District
• GF Public Health Department
• State Department of Health
City of GF Ordinance
• Stricter language than state.
Sports arena means any facility or area, whether an indoor or outdoor...
Tobacco-Free Parks
• Board Commissioners wanted a survey of
softball players and golfers
• Received $5,000
• No progress o...
Next Steps
• NDSU Extension will lead the initiatives.
• Continue to engage community partners.
• Delegate work to others ...
Achieve Healthier Communities CDC Grant results, NDSU Extension Grand Forks County, October 2013
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Achieve Healthier Communities CDC Grant results, NDSU Extension Grand Forks County, October 2013

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Grand Forks Park District received a $40,000 grant in 2010. This powerpoint is an update on the results of the grant work to October 2013. Initiatives include working toward: tobacco-free parks, healthy food at concession stands at schools and the Park District Concessions, recognition for healthy offerings at area restaurants, providing EBT machines for the local farmer's markets, and children's gardens.

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  • National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA).Our nation faces a crisis due to the burden of chronic disease. Today, 7 of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States are chronic diseases, and nearly 50% of Americans live with at least one chronic illness. People who suffer from chronic conditions such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, obesity, and arthritis experience limitations to function, health, activity, and work. These limitations affect the quality of their lives, as well as the lives of their families.Treatment for people with chronic conditions accounts for more than 75% of the $2 trillion spent annually on medical care in the United States. Effectively addressing the national chronic disease crisis is central to the future of health care in our nation and a priority for policy makers and those who pay for public and private health insurance plans.Preventable health risks such as tobacco and excessive alcohol use, insufficient physical activity, and poor nutrition contribute to the development and severity of many chronic diseases. For example,Tobacco use is the single most avoidable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Each year, an estimated 443,000 people die prematurely from smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke. Despite these risks, more than 43 million (about 1 of 5) U.S. adults smoke.During 2001–2005, about 79,000 deaths were caused by excessive alcohol use annually. Excessive alcohol use is the third leading lifestyle-related cause of death for Americans each year.In 2009, more than 80% of high school students and more than half (56%) of all adults did not In 2009, more than 80% of high school students and more than half (56%) of all adults did not meet recommendations for aerobic physical activity from the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. These guidelines call for at least 60 minutes each day of physical activity for children and adolescents and 75–150 minutes each week (depending on activity intensity) for adults.In 2009, only 34% of high school students ate at least 2 servings of fruit each day, and only 14% ate at least 3 servings of vegetables daily. Only 23% of U.S. adults ate 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day.In addition, some population groups in the United States suffer disproportionately from chronic diseases and associated risk factors. For example,Death rates for heart disease are 23% higher among African Americans than among whites; death rates for stroke are 31% higher.African American, Hispanic, American Indian, and Alaska Native adults are twice as likely as white adults to have diabetes.The Burden of Chronic DiseaseHeart disease and stroke remain the first and third leading causes of death, accounting for more than 30% of all U.S. deaths. One million Americans are disabled from strokes, and many can no longer perform daily tasks such as walking or bathing without help.Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes. An estimated 79 million U.S. adults have prediabetes, which places them at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations, and blindness among adults aged 20–74 years.Cancer claims more than half a million lives each year and remains the nation's second leading cause of death. The total number of Americans living with a previous diagnosis of cancer is currently estimated at 11 million.One of every 3 U.S. adults and nearly 1 of 5 children aged 6–19 years are obese. Obesity has been linked to increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, arthritis-related disability, and some cancers.An estimated 50 million U.S. adults reported being told by a doctor that they have some form of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Arthritis results in activity limitations for nearly 21 million Americans.Producing ResultsStrong action at the community level is critical to addressing chronic disease trends. CDC's Healthy Communities Program provides funding and technical assistance to select communities, states, and national groups to help them prevent chronic diseases at the local level. The program adheres to the following key principles and strategies to create and sustain health improvements in funded communities:Respond to community needs through partnerships.Implement large-scale interventions in multiple settings.Reach diverse population groups to promote health equity.Make interventions sustainable.All about Policy and Environmental change
  • Community leaders in key positionsInitial team of 10 included. Added: Don’t have a council member anymoreNDSU ExtensionCoalition for a Healthy Greater Grand ForksNew Horizon Chiropractic & Wellness CenterWorkers came from NDSU Extension Service, Donna, Katie, Carrie, SteveGF Park DistrictHuman Nutrition Research Center,Grand Forks Public SchoolsGF Public Health DepartmentAltru Health System
  • Bismarck “Go Bismarck”Fargo Streets Alive, Schools Alive etc.
  • The biggest problem at many arenas is space and the restrictions on storage
  • The health kids menu items focus on nutritionally dense foods like: whole grain breads, fruits, vegetables, low-fat milk and cheese, and lean protein. The Take Action logo may be used on menus if the following nutrition criteria are met.
  • Achieve Healthier Communities CDC Grant results, NDSU Extension Grand Forks County, October 2013

    1. 1. ACHIEVE Healthier Communities Centers for Disease Control Grant Results
    2. 2. ACHIEVE Action Communities for Health, Innovation and EnVironmental ChangE
    3. 3. CHART Community Health Action Response Team Grand Forks (GF) Park District GF Health Department GF Public Schools GF, EGF Metropolitan Planning Organization GF City Council YMCA UND Work Well Coalition for a Healthy Greater Grand Forks
    4. 4. CHANGE Community Health Assessment aNd Group Evaluation • Change Tool – Snapshot of local policy, system, and environmental change strategies – Identifies areas where health strategies are lacking and then define an dprioritize areas for improvement.
    5. 5. New Logo
    6. 6. Goals • • • • • Healthy Concession Stands Healthy Restaurants Children’s Community Gardens EBT Machines for Farmers Markets Tobacco-Free Parks
    7. 7. Healthy Concession Stands Partners: • Park District • NDSU Extension Service • GF Public Schools – Boosters – Superintendent of Teaching and Learning – Principals – Child Nutrition Program
    8. 8. Concession Stands: Park District Decreased to 5 candy bar choices – “healthier”, lower calorie, • • • • • Three Muskateers, Rollos, Kit Kat, Peppermint Patties and Reeses Pieces. Decreased to 5 candy choices. (children’s most popular items) – ring pops (high sugar but fat free), – Extremes – Gummy candy – 2 others
    9. 9. Park District Concession Stands New items • granola • yogurt • applesauce • mandarin orange cups • vitamin waters • teas • string cheese • whole wheat buns • no more cotton candy No decrease in sales! • All chips sold are baked • Hot dogs are all beef, lower in fat • Taco-in-a-bag used seasoned ground turkey with added bean • Popcorn oil is canola not trans-fat
    10. 10. Healthy Restaurant Initiative Partners: • Park District • NDSU Extension Service • GF Public Health • GF Public Schools • Altru Health System
    11. 11. Food Group Definitions Healthy Menu Items Nutritionally Dense Food Focus • Whole grain breads, • Fruit: ½ cup min. (Fresh, frozen, or canned). • Vegetables: ½ cup min. (Fresh, frozen, or canned). • Whole Grains: • • Fruits, Vegetables, Contains whole grains. • Lean protein: At least 2 ounces meat, 1 egg equivalent, 1 oz. nuts/seeds/dry bean/peas. • Low-fat milk and cheese (skinless white meat poultry, fish, seafood, beef, pork, tofu, beans, eggs): • Lean protein. • Dairy: 8 oz. low-fat milk (1% or skim milk), 8 oz. calcium fortified soy milk.
    12. 12. The Take Action logo may be used on menus if the following nutrition criteria are met for adults. . Full Meal (entrée, side option and beverage): • 700 calories or less • ≤30% of calories from total fat • ≤10% of calories from saturated fat • <0.5 grams trans fat • ≤770 mg of sodium • 2 or more food groups (see below) Side Items: • 300 calories or less • ≤30% of calories from total fat • ≤10% of calories from saturated fat • <0.5 grams artificial trans fat • ≤250 mg of sodium • 100% fruit, vegetables or juice; and low fat (1%) and skim milks are permitted • 1 food group
    13. 13. The Take Action logo may be used on menus if the following criteria are met for children. Full Meal (entrée, side option and beverage): • • • • • • Side Items: • 600 calories or less • ≤30% of calories from total fat • ≤10% of calories from saturated fat • <0.5 grams trans fat • ≤770 mg of sodium • 2 or more food groups 200 calories or less ≤30% of calories from total fat ≤10% of calories from saturated fat <0.5 grams artificial trans fat ≤250 mg of sodium 100% fruit, vegetables or juice; and low fat (1%) and skim milks are permitted • 1 food group
    14. 14. Nutrition Criteria for Kids’ Meals Full Meal (entrée, side option and beverage): 600 calories or less • ≤30% of calories from total fat • ≤10% of calories from saturated fat • <0.5 grams trans fat • ≤770 mg of sodium • 2 or more food groups (see below) Side Items: 200 calories or less • ≤30% of calories from total fat • ≤10% of calories from saturated fat • <0.5 grams artificial trans fat • ≤250 mg of sodium • 100% fruit, vegetables or juice; and low fat (1%) and skim milks are permitted • 1 food group
    15. 15. Rosemary Roasted Potatoes 1 pound small, red potatoes 2 Tbsp. olive oil ½ tsp. crushed, dried rosemary ½ tsp. salt Preheat oven to 400 F. Wash potatoes thoroughly. Cut in half. Arrange in shallow pan. Drizzle with olive oil and turn to coat well. Sprinkle with rosemary and salt. Stir to mix well. Bake uncovered in a 400 F oven, stirring occasionally, until tender (25 to 35 minutes). Makes four servings. Each serving has 145 calories, 18g carbohydrate, 7.2g fat, 2g fiber and 298mg sodium
    16. 16. EBT Machines at Farmer’s Markets Partners: • Park District • GF Public Health • State Department of Health
    17. 17. • Choice Health and Fitness: Sprouts Deli serves healthy foods. – Monster cookies made with apple sauce – Nothing fried – Chocolate peanut butter truffles with whole grain chips and dark chocolate. – Brownie tart made with beans
    18. 18. EBT Machines at Farmer’s Markets • • • • • • • • Bismarck BisMarket Farmers Market Saturdays - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Sertoma Park, Shelter Skyline Ranch Produce Sundays - 12 to 5 p.m. - Kmart Pkg Lot Tuesdays - 12 to 5 p.m. - Kmart Pkg Lot Thursday – 12 to 5 p.m. - Kmart Pkg Lot Beulah Skyline Ranch Produce Wednesdays - 3 to 6 p.m. Shopko Pkg Lot Fargo Bill Erbes Farm Tues., Thurs., and Sat. - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Great Plains Produce Association Farmers’ Market , Dike East Park – • • • • • • • • Hazen Skyline Ranch Produce Mondays - 3 to 6 p.m. (ct) All Season’s Arena Minot North Prairie Farmers Market Saturdays - 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Intersection Washburn Skyline Ranch Produce Fridays - 4 to 7 p.m. (ct) (through Sept.) Fridays - 3 to 6 p.m. (ct) (Oct.) Cenex West Fargo Hildebrant’s Farmers Market Mondays to Fridays - 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays - 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays - Noon to 6 p.m.
    19. 19. First Steps Get an FCN number • Can be a lengthy process • Can accept debit and credit cards. • http://www.fns.usda.gov/s nap/retailers/applicationprocess.htm Contacts • John Klein, Max ,ND 701-679-2693
    20. 20. Goals Farmer’s Markets Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) Machines Partners: • Park District • GF Department of Health • USDA Human Nutrition Research Center • NDSU Extension
    21. 21. Children’s Gardens Partners: • Park District • NDSU Extension Service • GF Public Schools • US Green Building Council • Rydell • USDA – Natural Resources Conservation Service – Human Nutrition Research Center
    22. 22. Century School Garden
    23. 23. Century School Garden
    24. 24. Century School Garden
    25. 25. School Orchard
    26. 26. Lake Agassiz School Garden
    27. 27. Tobacco-Free Parks • Park District • GF Public Health Department • State Department of Health
    28. 28. City of GF Ordinance • Stricter language than state. Sports arena means any facility or area, whether an indoor or outdoor place, where members of the public assemble to engage in physical exercise, participate in athletic competition, or witness sports or other events, including but not limited to sports pavilions, stadiums, gymnasiums, health spas, boxing arenas, swimming pools, roller and ice rinks, race tracks, ball parks, athletic fields, stadiums, grandstands, and bowling centers.
    29. 29. Tobacco-Free Parks • Board Commissioners wanted a survey of softball players and golfers • Received $5,000 • No progress on this to date.
    30. 30. Next Steps • NDSU Extension will lead the initiatives. • Continue to engage community partners. • Delegate work to others involved.

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