2009, All rights reserved.
L e v e r a g e   Y o u r   P a s t , C a p i t a l i z e o n   Y o u r   P r e s e n t ,
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Peak Performance Mentor Handbook

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Leadership Development Series
Part II - 12 Months to Peak Performance
Developed by: Nina Wilson for Jewish Hospital & St. Mary\'s Healthcare - Louisville, KY

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Peak Performance Mentor Handbook

  1. 1. 2009, All rights reserved. L e v e r a g e Y o u r P a s t , C a p i t a l i z e o n Y o u r P r e s e n t , F o r g e Y o u r F u t u r e
  2. 2. Mentoring: Innovative Management “Over time your "human capital" is the best competitive edge you have. We have seen that demonstrated in every facet from sports to the military and now the world economy. It's just good business.” -Mark Herbert Author, speaker, coach, and "lighthouse" construction executive
  3. 3. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Table of Contents Introduction……………………………………………………………………………3 12 Months At-A-Glance………………………………………………………………4 Mentor – Poem………………………………………………………………………...5 Protégé –Poem………………………………………………………………………..6 Month 1 – April……………..………………………………………………………...7 Icebreaker - Bucket List & Predictive Index Month 2 – May…………………………….…………………………………..……..13 Goal Setting Month 3 – June………………………………….....................................................…19 The Peter Principle - “I think I Can” Month 4 – July……………………………………………………………………….22 Incentives & Rewards Month 5 – August….……………………………………………………………..… 25 Diversity Perspectives Month 6 – September………………………………..……………………………….30 Scenario Brainstorming Month 7 – October………………………………………………….……………..…35 Perspective Dilemma & Diversity Follow Up Month 8 – November………………………….……………………………. ……....37 Making Stress an Asset Month 9 – December……………………………...................................……………39 Time Management Month 10 – January………………………………………………………………….41 Conflict Resolution Month 11 – February……………………………………………………….……..…45 Appreciation Inquiry &Appreciation Inquiry Worksheet Month 12 – March ……………………………………………..………….. ……….46 Measuring Effectiveness 2
  4. 4. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E INTRODUCTION Mentoring brings many ideas and presumptions to mind. In the spirit of Innovative Management, this handbook is designed to be mutually beneficial for the mentor and protégé as leaders. For your reading comfort, we will refer to the mentor to represent the principal in the relationship and the word protégé is used in lieu of the more traditional word mentee. Each month’s activity is designed to serve as a platform for interactive dialogue, provoking unique insights into the leadership experiences of both participants. We concur with the philosophy of mentoring as described by the United States Coast Guard – “individuals who share knowledge, experiences and skills to benefit someone else provide valuable leadership”. Many mentoring program models exist from which we could have borrowed content and used it to design a model for JHSMH, however this model has been uniquely and distinctly designed with the leaders of this healthcare organization in mind – in other words, it has been designed with YOU in mind to assist in your continuing professional development and to help you to capitalize on your strengths, and to come to terms with areas where deficiencies may require you to take action steps for the good of your team and for the good of the organization overall. A 12-month action plan has been developed to ensure you as the mentor and you as the protégé will both benefit from the relationship. Each activity builds on the previous month’s activity. On the following page, you will see the 12 months at-a-glance which you can use as a planning reference. Preparing for each activity prior to your scheduled monthly appointment will greatly enhance the value of these exercises. Peak performance is the common objective, therefore, we hope this unique resource helps you to leverage your past, capitalize on your present, and forge your future at JHSMH. 3
  5. 5. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E 12 Months to Peak Performance This is the screenshot for your mentoring relationship for the next 12 months. The activities associated with each month are designed for you to collaborate with each other to meet stated goals. It is suggested that you make a copy of this page or the at-a-glance calendar following this page and use it as a reference for you to prepare in advance for the coming months. Month 1 – April Icebreaker Bucket List Predictive Index Month 2 – May Goal Setting Month 3 – June Peter Principle “I think I Can” Month 4 – July Incentives & Rewards Month 5 – August Diversity Month 6 – September Scenario Brainstorming Month 7 – October Perspective Dilemma Diversity Follow Up Month 8 – November Making Stress Work Month 9 – December Time Management Month 10 – January Conflict Resolution Month 11 – February Appreciation Inquiry Worksheet Month 12 – March Measuring Effectiveness 4
  6. 6. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E To the Mentor "Allow humans to be themselves and celebrate that selfness. Love the metaphoric mind and respect the rational. Nurture Motivation. Consider any attempt at communication appropriate. Celebrate the whole person!" -Bob Samples- 5
  7. 7. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E To the Protege "If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.” -Henry Ford- 6
  8. 8. 1 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E APRIL MONTH Icebreaker/PI Review WHAT’S IN YOUR BUCKET? 7
  9. 9. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Why a Bucket List? It is more than a to-do-list. Maybe you've avoided doing what really matters to you because you didn't want to admit to anyone that you've got a hole in your blessed bucket. A lot of people are unsure as to what to include in a bucket list, so they decide to put it off until they're crystal clear on exactly what they want. Don't allow performance anxiety to stop you from creating your bucket list. Just writing things down is therapeutic, and often you will find it is almost eery how writing things down causes them to manifest in reality! It gets your creative juices flowing and makes you stop and take inventory – even though we’re often too busy to do anything that requires us to stop. Let’s get you started… You're going to create your list by having an individual brainstorming session. Play baroque music in the background, if you have it. Baroque music, such as "The Four Seasons" by Antonio Vivaldi and Pachbel's "Cannon" have been shown to slow brainwaves down to the alpha range, the brain frequency which has been linked to increased creativity. Do not criticize or evaluate what you write down during the brainstorming process: you're trying to open yourself up to possibilities. Write down whatever comes into your head, it doesn't matter how wildly impractical the idea seems. Basically, you're going to have to quiet your internal critic, that little voice in your head that might be saying: "You can't do that", "that's silly", or "I can't afford that." Push the limits on what you currently think is possible for you and think outside the boundaries of your current life. Don't stop at 15 - write as many things that come to mind! Later you can sift through the list you created and narrow it down if you need to. 8
  10. 10. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Desires Objectives Goals Expectations Hopes Opportunities Ideas Plans Dreams Wishes Aspirations Possibilities Have you seen the movie, “The Bucket List”, a 2007 comedy-drama film starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman? The main plot follows two terminally ill men (Nicholson and Freeman) on their road trip with a wish list of things to do before they "kick the bucket." ACTIVITY I: Use this concept as an icebreaker. Ask your protégé the question, “what’s in your bucket”? Ask him/her to prepare a list of 15 entries to add to their own personal bucket list; you can join in on this activity. 1. Ask yourself respectively the 5 following questions for each entry to help you form a picture of your “life-after-work” future. o #1 What do I want to do with the rest of my life? Or, what’s my “bucket list” if you are a fan of the book/movie of the same name? o #2 Who do I want with me as I undertake new adventures? o #3 Where do I want to call home while I do these things? o #4 How can I minimize anger/worry about past and future? o #5 How do I want to be remembered? 2. Share your bucket lists with each other and reflect and encourage periodically throughout your mentoring relationship. Recommendation for “ownwork”… At home and in your own/off time, it is recommended that you take this a step further and make a separate list that includes who or what help you might need to make the items on your list happen. Where possible, put tentative deadlines on your entries. 9
  11. 11. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E 1. Write a script for a TV show 2. Do stand-up comedy 3. Write a children's book 4. Go camping 5. Ride a gondola in Venice 6. Learn how to salsa dance 7. Host Saturday Night Live 8. Visit a Renaissance fair 9. See the Mona Lisa at the Louvre 10. Witness a solar eclipse "Will you succeed? Yes, you will indeed (98 3/4% guaranteed)." - Dr. Seuss 10
  12. 12. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Bucket List Form 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 11
  13. 13. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E What is your management style? How does it impact your team? What style indicators initiate or motivate? What can a mentoring relationship do to enhance or improve your performance? How can you as a mentor affect the quality of a protégé’s management capabilities? These are some questions that you may want to ask yourself prior to embracing the idea of engaging in a mentoring relationship. 12
  14. 14. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Review Your Predictive Index Results y now, you have completed the Predictive Index® (PI) and you know it is a unique in-house management tool that has been helping executives throughout the world develop their leaders and improve their organization’s performance since 1955. Based on proven behavioral science techniques, Predictive Index measures work-related behaviors. Through this analysis activity, you can illustrate how to best motivate, lead and leverage a person's strengths to achieve the company goals. Practical Applications The Predictive Index can be applied in your department to improve effectiveness and productivity in a number of ways that include: developing future leaders, motivating your people, building strong teams, strategizing for future growth, coaching to improve performance defining job requirements, attracting the best candidates, selecting and hiring the right people, dealing effectively with conflict, planning succession that works. Excerpted from: PI Consulting Group, Inc., 10/13/2009 Revised 10/15/2009 ACTIVITY II Mentor – Arrange a consultation with the protégé to review the results from your PI assessments respectively. Use questions from the previous page to Identify and discuss two potential strengths and weaknesses with regard to the PI; elaborate. Discuss developing a plan of action for building on strengths and one for reducing weak areas; have the protégé give a verbal report of his/her initiatives; discuss initiatives. 13
  15. 15. 2 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E MAY MONTH (Wildly Important Goals) Wildly Important Goals are a specific subset of SMART Goals. Wildly Important Goals only work in certain situations — would they work in yours? 14
  16. 16. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E WILDLY IMPORTANT GOALS ARE SMART! SMART Goals are WILDLY important to your success! Understanding the goal definitions, how goals are rated in the performance review and what ranking means for your performance. S.M.A.R.T. Goals are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely. • — Specific. Specific is the What, Why, and How of the SMART model. This section looks at the normal SMART goal definition of Specific, but then looks at the traps for the Cubicle Warrior from the definition. And how to get around them. • — Measurable. If you can't measure it, you can't manage it. Choose a goal with measurable progress, so you can see the change occur. How will you see when you reach your goal? When you measure your progress, you stay on track, reach your target dates, and experience the exhilaration of achievement that spurs you on to continued effort required to reach your goals. • — Attainable. There is a story to attainment, one that you and your manager must agree to in order for a goal to be attainable. When you identify goals that are most important to you, you begin to figure out ways you can make them come true. • — Relevant. Relevant, in this case, means "do-able." It means that the learning curve is not a vertical slope; that the skills needed to do the work are available; that the project fits with the overall strategy and goals of the organization. • — Timely. Yes, SMART Goals need to have a time frame with them. But what kind of time frame? This section looks at the three date types associated with a SMART Goal. Plus a good look at the Time Bound challenges all Cubicle Warriors face with a SMART Goal. And we even look at how dates and relevancy interact in meeting goals. 15
  17. 17. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Strategies for Setting W.I.G.S. Goal Setting Strategies You see, this isn’t just about defining goals and then leaving you hanging out to dry when it comes to setting goals with your mentor. This section gives you four goal setting strategies to use to fit your SMART Goals with your job situation. According to the Harvard Review, in most organizations, promotions are governed by unwritten rules—the often fuzzy, intuitive, and poorly expressed feelings of senior executives regarding individuals’ ability to succeed... As an organizational leader, (or soon-to-be), you might not know the specific skills you need to develop or demonstrate. The bottom line: You’re left to your own devices in interpreting feedback and finding a way to achieve your career goals. ACTIVITY • Develop a personal mission statement and write it down in a clean, unused journal or notebook. If you need help with this activity, visit http://www.franklincovey.com/msb/missions/login and use this template and mission builder process to obtain a personal mission statement. • Begin to reflect on your personal mission and use it to develop at least 5 short term and 5 long term goals. • Use the W.I.G. builder (next page) and write these down. • Record the date you begin this process. • Set a date to review your goals with your mentor. 16
  18. 18. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E 17
  19. 19. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Use the space below to craft your W.I.G.s Short Term W.I.G.s 1.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 2.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 3.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 4.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 5.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Long Term W.I.G.s 1.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 2.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 3.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 4.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 5.______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 18
  20. 20. 3 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E JUNE MONTH The Peter Principle “I think I Can” Leadership at JHSMH is comprised of a diverse and talented group of physicians, entrepreneurs, attorneys, civic and community leaders who are committed to its team members, leaders and patients. By providing world class training, development and accountability, the bar is raised to further make a difference in the lives of our colleagues and most importantly, in the lives of those we serve – our patients. Mentors have a vital role to play in generating and preparing the next generation of leaders. It is a role that many assume without active co- preparation of the mentoring partners. The idea is to transition upwards into a position of confident and competent leadership. The Peter Principle is the concept that in bureaucratic organizations, new employees generally start off in the bottom ranks of the company, such as the mailroom. As the workers prove their competence in the lower level ranks, they are then promoted up the ladder, generally management. Excerpted from: http://www.envisionsoftware.com/Management?Peter_Principle.html (accessed 10.06/2009) It is the theory that employees within an organization will advance to their highest level of competence and then be promoted to and remain at a level at which they are incompetent. It has been described as promoting staff prematurely and without the supports needed to grow into a leadership role – it often assumes that the mentee wants to be a manager, when in fact, that may not be his or her goal at all. 19
  21. 21. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Edward P. Lazear of Hoover Institution and Stanford University wrote in The Peter Principle: A Theory of Decline: Some have observed that individuals perform worse after being promoted. The Peter principle, which states that people are promoted to their level of incompetence, suggests that something is fundamentally misaligned in the promotion process. As managers, we should be cautious not to promote our team members to levels of incompetency; we do not want to set our colleagues up to fail, but rather focus on their strengths and work to develop their weaker areas. ACTIVITY: • Take inventory. Develop a personal inventory system using your PI (Predictive Index). • Discuss the Peter Principle • Complete the KSA Worksheet on the following page. 20
  22. 22. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Knowledge, Skills & Abilities A Framework to Follow “In my current position as a _____________with the _______________, I have had extensive experience with…” “In the course of my duties as a __________. I am responsible for…” “During my tenure with ________________, a substantial part of my duties have included…” “My ability to _____________was gained through formal education augmented by over __years of practical experience as a ___________________for the _____________” Give examples that clearly demonstrate your knowledge, skills and abilities “”In one instance I…” “When I started on the job, we had a recurring problem with …” “My bossselected me to serve on a task force to……” “I collaborated with a team to …” Take your examples one step further. Look for key results. Quantify if possible. “The new procedures I instituted resulted in …” “My ability to_________________ substantially/significantly increased/decreased…” “As a result…” “I received a Performance Award for…” “We exceeded our goals by…” “This led to…” 21
  23. 23. 4 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E JULY MONTH 22
  24. 24. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Rewarding Others - Giving Credit where Credit is due… Mentoring requires a considerable commitment of time, effort, skill and caring on the part of people who are already busy. It is important to include some form of incentives, recognition and support for the mentoring program. Research and studies indicate there is a very clear structure that exists for best practice in this area. In support of JHSMH’s commitment to service and recognition, Peer-to-Peer recognition encourages team members to recognize each other for displaying behaviors that align with the JHSMH Pillars, Values, and Standards of Performance. Standards of Performance: • Attitude • Appearance • Communication • Responsiveness • Commitment to Team Members • Safety It is vital that we recognize our team members in unique ways to provide team member motivation, positive team member morale, rewards and recognition. What creates motivated, contributing team members? How do you maintain high morale when people work long hours? It is also vital to recognize there are 3 levels of organizational performers, high performers, middle performers, and low performers. One way to implement a rewards system that will strengthen your team member morale is to create goals and action plans that recognize the actions, behaviors, approaches, and accomplishments you want to foster and reward. Establish employee recognition opportunities that emphasize and reinforce these sought-after qualities and behaviors. 23
  25. 25. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E For you, the mentor, the JHSMH R*E*W*A*R*D*S program provides a tool for you to be recognized and for you to recognize your peers for living our Mission, Vision, and Values while upholding these Standards of Performance. At a convenient time, be sure to visit the REWARDS program Web site http://jhsmhrewards.performnet.com (or go to the JHSMH Intranet home page) and do a drop down on the Web link bar. ACTIVITY: • Discuss unique methods to reward high performers • Do the same thing for middle performers • Give some thought to what works for rewarding seasoned managers • Discuss appropriate ways to reward low performers (Read “The One Minute Manager”) • Discuss the REWARDS initiatives and some ways you can earn and accumulate AwardperQs and set up a home page (if you do not have one), and monitor your point earnings and participate in recognizing other team members. 24
  26. 26. 5 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E AUGUST MONTH The Mentoring Relationship & Mentoring is most effective when there is an atmosphere of mutual respect. The relationship can actually become a hardship for a person who is considered to be a minority and are trying to overcome the effects of bias, stereotypes and potential discrimination. The mentor can learn about the cultural background and experiences of the protégé and the protégé can learn about the cultural background and experiences of the mentor. Diversity is a word we tend to put in a box with one label – that label is race. The Assistant Vice President in the Office of Diversity of JHSMH, Deborah A. May informs us of the Primary and Secondary Dimensions of Diversity as described by Loden and Rosner of Workforce America (1991) below. The primary dimensions are: age, race, ethnicity, physical qualities, gender, and sexual orientation. The secondary dimensions are work background, geographical location, marital status, military experience, religious beliefs, education, parental status, and income. Bill George, professor of management practice at Harvard Business School writes in the November 2009 issue of U.S. News & World Report 25
  27. 27. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E about Eboo Patel who is an activist and one of President Barack Obama’s advisers on faith says in an article titled Uniting the Young on Religious Tolerance, “women’s rights are a social norm today, and everyone in America should challenge religious prejudice just like we challenge racial and gender prejudice.” In the same article, George writes President Obama addressed the common principles of America and Islam in his Cairo speech in June: he said “justice and progress; tolerance and the dignity of all human beings. ACTIVITY: 1. Mentor and protégé : Volunteer at the JHSMH booth during the WorldFest cultural event during Labor Day at the Belvedere or attend the event and sample foods, or engage in an activity from another culture. 2. Find another educational opportunity within the community, i.e. St. James Art Fair, the Muhammad Ali Center. Follow up and discuss your experiences during month seven. 3. Attend the mandatory HealthStream module on the JHSMH Intranet on diversity. Attend this module separately or along with your mentor/protégé. 4. Read from the following list of reading resources and plan to discuss your book. JHSMH is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. As a leader in the organization, you must ensure there is zero tolerance for discrimination in relationship to any of the primary or secondary dimensions of diversity as mentioned above. 26
  28. 28. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Diversity Reading List Making Diversity Work: 7 Steps for Defeating Bias in the Workplace by Sondra Thiederman (Paperback - May 6, 2008) The Diversity Toolkit : How You Can Build and Benefit from a Diverse Workforce by William Sonnenschein (Paperback - Mar 11, 1999) **Building a House for Diversity: A Fable About a Giraffe & an Elephant Offers New Strategies for Today's Workforce by R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr., Marjorie I. Woodruff, and R. Roosevelt, Jr. Thomas (Hardcover - Jun 1, 1999) RECOMMENDED BY DEBORAH MAY – VICE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF DIVERSITY – JHSMH Harvard Business Review on Managing Diversity by R. Roosevelt Thomas, David A. Thomas, Robin J. Ely, and Meyerson Debra (Paperback - Feb 1, 2002) Managing Diversity: Toward a Globally Inclusive Workplace by Dr. Michalle E. Mor Barak (Paperback - Feb 1, 2005) Diversity in Organizations by Myrtle P. Bell (Hardcover - Feb 16, 2006) Diversity Training (ASTD Trainer's Workshop) by Cris Wildermuth and Susan Gray (Paperback - Jan 15, 2005) Workplace Diversity: A Manager's Guide to Solving Problems and Turning Diversity into a Competitive Advantage by Katharine Esty, Richard Griffin, and Marcie Schorr Hirsch (Paperback - Jun 1995) Supervision: Diversity and Teams in the Workplace (10th Edition) by Charles R. Greer and Richard Warren Plunkett (Paperback - Jul 7, 2002) 27
  29. 29. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E 28
  30. 30. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E The Diversity Wheel, developed by Marilyn Loden identifies many aspects of diversity. 29
  31. 31. 6 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E SEPTEMBER MONTH Scenario Brainstorm & Mind Map Session ( Picture from thetalkingmirror.com/2009/03/) This month is a half-way marker; you’re six months into your relationship with your mentor/protege - so use it as a time to reflect on the previous five months and to brainstorm for breakthrough ideas, talk about questions, conflicts and concerns, diagnose learning needs and performance issues at various intervals and finally plan for solutions. What Is Brainstorming? MindTools.com describes brainstorming as a combination of relaxed and informal approaches to problem-solving with lateral thinking. It asks that people come up with ideas and thoughts that can at first seem to be a bit crazy. The idea here is that some of these ideas can be crafted into original, creative solutions to the problem you're trying to solve, while others can spark still more ideas. This approach aims to get people unstuck, by "jolting" them out of their normal ways of thinking. During brainstorming sessions there should therefore be no criticism of ideas: You are trying to open up possibilities and break down wrong assumptions about the limits of the problem. Judgments and analysis at this stage stunt idea generation. 30
  32. 32. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Ideas should only be evaluated at the end of the brainstorming session – this is the time to explore solutions further using conventional approaches. The mentor should help the protege to analyze their job tasks, observe and review selected documents for clarity and understanding and even discuss conditions such as environment and facilities. Individual Brainstorming Many studies show individual brainstorming is more effective than group brainstorming at producing more and this occurs partly because, in groups, people aren’t always strict in following the rules of brainstorming, and “bad” group behaviors creep in. Mostly, though, this occurs because people are paying so much attention to other people’s ideas that they're not generating ideas of their own – or they're forgetting these ideas while they wait for their turn to speak. This is called "blocking". When you brainstorm on your own, you'll tend to produce a wider range of ideas than with group brainstorming - you do not have to worry about other people's egos or opinions, and can therefore be more freely creative. For example, you might find that an idea you’d be hesitant to bring up in a group session develops into something quite special when you explore it with individual brainstorming. Nor do you have to wait for others to stop speaking before you contribute your own ideas. You may not, however, develop ideas as fully when you brainstorm on your own, as you do not have the wider experience of other members of a group to help you. MindMapping Use a technique called MindMapping to help uncover your ideas. Mind Mapping is a useful technique that improves the way you take notes, and supports and enhances your creative problem solving. By using Mind Maps, you can quickly identify and understand the structure of a subject, and the way that pieces of information fit together, as well as recording the raw facts contained in Ref. http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newISS_01.htm (accessed 11/8/09) normal notes. 31
  33. 33. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ACTIVITY I: Make a mind map to help you identify the issues that surfaced during your brainstorm session. (See figure 1, next page) A complete mind map may have main topic lines radiating in all directions from the center. Sub-topics and facts will branch off these, like branches and twigs from the trunk of a tree. You do not need to worry about the structure produced, as this will evolve as you develop your mind map. Follow these steps to make your initial mind map. To make notes on a subject using a Mind Map, draw it in the following way: 1. Write the title of the subject you're exploring in the center of the page, and draw a circle around it. 2. As you come across major subdivisions or subheadings of the topic (or important facts that relate to the subject) draw lines out from this circle. Label these lines with these subdivisions or subheadings. 3. As you "burrow" into the subject and uncover another level of information (further subheadings, or individual facts) belonging to the subheadings above, draw these as lines linked to the subheading lines. 4. Finally, for individual facts or ideas, draw lines out from the appropriate heading line and label them. 32
  34. 34. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Mind Map (Figure 1) 33
  35. 35. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ACTIVITY II: Scenario-Storming Review the 3 fictitious Team Member scenarios below and determine (together) the appropriate course of action. Use the MindMapping strategy if applicable. 1. A part time Team Member has called out sick five days in a row and has 9 occurrence points currently. What steps should the Manager take to ensure the appropriate action is taken?  2. A team member has been observed by other team members using foul language and has recently refused to perform a task by the Leader. How should the Leader manage this situation?  3. A team member has been accessing a patient record that he/she is currently not assigned to? The manager is told by another team member. What are the steps the Leader should take in addressing this?  34
  36. 36. 7 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E OCTOBER MONTH Perspective Diagram ` PERSPECTIVES DIAGRAM INSTRUCTIONS Think of a personal or professional dilemma you face. This dilemma can be anything as significant as “Whom should I marry”? or “Should I apply for the promotion at work”? To… “Should I exercise today”, or “Should I save the money instead of eating out for lunch?” Write the dilemma at the top of the page. Then, in each piece of the “pie”, think of an alternate perspective, which you may or may not have already considered. Examples of perspectives: 1. Name of colleague who might be affected positively by outcome of your decision 2. Name of family member or friend who might be affected positively by your decision 3. Name of colleague, family member or friend who might be affected negatively by your decision 4. Finance 5. Safety 6. Ethics or morality 7. Your personal values 8. Name of wise person who could provide guidance and has provided helpful counsel in past 9. Your well being 10. Your future 35
  37. 37. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ACTIVITY On the outside of each “pie” piece, you will write on the black line, one of the sample perspectives (examples from above can be chosen, or you can create your own perspectives.) In the inside of each pie piece, describe in detail, what the perspective might be of that person or thing. The objective? The more thoroughly you review various perspectives in depth, the better equipped you are to make a wise decision. Follow up from diversity in month 5. Discuss with mentor/protégé and what has been learned. 36
  38. 38. 8 I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E NOVEMBER MONTH tress can arise for a variety of reasons. Stress can be brought about by a traumatic accident, death or emergency situation. Stress can also be a side effect of a serious illness or disease. There is also stress associated with daily life, the workplace, and family responsibilities. Both the perception of what is stressful and the physiological response to stress vary considerably among individuals. These differences are based on genetic factors and influences that can be traced back to infancy. Mild stress may cause changes that are useful. For example, NIDA says stress can actually improve our attention and increase our capacity to store and integrate important and life-protecting information. But if stress is prolonged or chronic, those changes can become harmful. Some Early signs of stress Stress can take on many different forms, and can contribute to symptoms of illness. Common symptoms include: 37
  39. 39. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E • headache Stress can arise for a variety of reasons. Stress can be brought about by a traumatic accident, death • sleep disorders or emergency situation. Stress can also be a side effect of a serious illness or disease. There is also stress associated with daily life, the workplace (Read about "Job Stress"), and family responsibilities • difficulty concentrating • short-temper • upset stomach • job dissatisfaction • low morale • depression • anxiety Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify, use, understand, and manage your emotions in positive and constructive ways. It's about recognizing your own emotional state and the emotional states of others. Emotional intelligence is also about engaging with others in ways that draw people to you. Most of us have intellectual knowledge on matters of stress. What we tend to lack in terms of stress management, is Emotional Intelligence or (EQ). Stress can affect our ability to respond to others from a place of calm versus responding from anxiety or anger. ACTIVITY: 1). Visit the Website HelpGuide.org (http://www.helpguide.org/mental/eq5_raising_emotional_intelligence.htm) and read about the Five Key Skills for Raising Your Emotional Intelligence. Once you’ve completed this reading, Take the emotional intelligence test offered by Psychology Today that evaluates different aspects of your emotional intelligence and suggests ways to improve it. After finishing the test, you will receive a Snapshot Report with an introduction, a graph and a personalized interpretation for one of your test scores. 2.) Two weeks in advance of next month’s activity, find 2 articles on how PROCRASTINATION & STRESS are interrelated. Prepare to review and reflect. 38
  40. 40. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 9 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E DECEMBER MONTH Time is the one thing we all have in the same, exact measure of twenty-four hours. As an organizational leader, how you manage your time is important because you have peers who depend on your productivity, but who also depend on your availability. It can be your most valuable asset and the lack of strong time management skills can be your greatest liability. Good time management like meeting planning both require the implementation of the same 4 p’s formula for optimal success: preparation + prioritizing + planning = productivity. The 80:20 Rule (Excerpted from Mindtools.com) This is neatly summed up in the Pareto Principle, or the '80:20 Rule'. This says that typically 80% of unfocussed effort generates only 20% of results. This means that the remaining 80% of results are achieved with only 20% of the effort. While the ratio is not always 80:20, this broad pattern of a small proportion of activity generating non-scalar returns recurs so frequently that it is the norm in many situations. By applying the time management tips and skills in this section you can optimize your effort to ensure that you concentrate as much of your time and energy as possible on the high payoff tasks. This ensures that you achieve the greatest benefit possible with the limited amount of time available to you. Your position requires that you are an effective time manager – it does not matter what your job title is. One job description for a Manager of Access Training and Quality under the section Demonstrates commitment to professional growth and competence. (Professional, supervisory, or managerial position) requires that the individual have the ability to Demonstrate effective time management by completing commitments within negotiated time frames. 39
  41. 41. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ACTIVITY: 1. Review your articles on PROCRASTINATION & STRESS from month eight. Discuss how they are interrelated. 2. Identify two biggest time consumers in the workplace. Discuss why these activities are so consuming and why we allow them to consume so much of our time. 40
  42. 42. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E JANUARY MONTH 10 indtools.com indicates successful managers can effectively manage conflict. This ability is considered a core competency and is required of managers who want to grow and advance. Unfortunately, it is also one of the most difficult skills for a manager to develop. In many cases, conflict in the workplace just seems to be a fact of life. We've all seen situations where different people with different goals and needs come into conflict. If a team member asks to be excused from performing an aspect of a patient's care or treatment because of a conflict with the team member's cultural values, sense of ethics, or religious beliefs or if the team member has a complaint, the procedures for supervisors and managers are to instruct him/her first to perform the task, then follow the formal procedure for complaint resolution. The fact that conflict exists, however, is not necessarily a bad thing. As long as it is resolved effectively, it can lead to personal and professional growth. In many cases, effective conflict resolution skills can make the difference between positive and negative outcomes. By resolving conflict successfully, you can solve many of the problems that it has brought to the surface, as well as getting benefits that you might not at first expect: increased understanding, increased group cohesion and improved self-knowledge. Conflict pushes individuals to examine their goals in close detail, helping them understand the things that are most important to them, sharpening their focus, and enhancing their effectiveness, however, if conflict is not handled effectively, the results can be damaging. Conflicting goals can quickly turn into personal dislike. Teamwork breaks down. Talent is wasted as people disengage from their work. And it's easy to end up in a vicious downward spiral of negativity and recrimination. Fortunately, there are concepts, theories and rules that can help us to engage in resolution strategies in lieu of avoiding the source of our dispute. The following section on conflict management explains two approaches to achieving resolution and restoring harmony to the team. Read and be prepared to discuss the two approaches. Do the related role play activity upon completion of your reading. 41
  43. 43. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Kenneth Thomas and Ralph Kilmann’s Conflict Styles In the 1970s Kenneth Thomas and Ralph Kilmann identified five main styles of dealing with conflict that vary in their degrees of cooperativeness and assertiveness. They help you to identify which style you tend towards when conflict arises. Use this as a reference to help you in the role play activity at the end of this section, and in resolving conflicts as they arise in your own department: Competitive: People who tend towards a competitive style take a firm stand, and know what they want. They usually operate from a position of power, drawn from things like position, rank, expertise, or persuasive ability. Collaborative: People tending towards a collaborative style try to meet the needs of all people involved. These people can be highly assertive but unlike the competitor, they cooperate effectively and acknowledge that everyone is important. This style is useful when you need to bring together a variety of viewpoints to get the best solution; when there have been previous conflicts in the group; or when the situation is too important for a simple trade-off. Compromising: People who prefer a compromising style try to find a solution that will at least partially satisfy everyone. Everyone is expected to give up something, and the compromiser him/herself also expects to relinquish something. Compromise is useful when the cost of conflict is higher than the cost of losing ground, when equal strength opponents are at a standstill and when there is a deadline looming. Accommodating: This style indicates a willingness to meet the needs of others at the expense of the person’s own needs. The accommodator often knows when to give in to others, but can be persuaded to surrender a position even when it is not warranted. This person is not assertive but is highly cooperative. Avoiding: People tending towards this style seek to evade the conflict entirely. This style is typified by delegating controversial decisions, accepting default decisions, and not wanting to hurt anyone’s feelings. It can be appropriate when victory is impossible, when the controversy is trivial, or when someone else is in a better position to solve the problem. Once you understand the different styles, you can use them to think about the most appropriate approach (or mixture of approaches) for the situation you're in. Ideally you can adopt an approach that meets the situation, resolves the problem, respects people's legitimate interests, and mends damaged working relationships. The second theory is commonly referred to as the "Interest-Based Relational Approach" or (IBR). This conflict resolution strategy respects individual differences while helping people avoid becoming too entrenched in a fixed position. In resolving conflict using this approach, you follow these IBR rules: 1. Make sure that good relationships are the first priority 2. Keep people and problems separate 3. Pay attention to the interests that are being presented 4. Listen first; talk second 5. Set out the “Facts 6. Explore options together By following these "Interest-Based Relational Approach" rules, you can often keep contentious discussions positive and constructive. 42
  44. 44. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ACTIVITY: After reading about the two conflict concepts and their corresponding resolution tools, pick one and apply them to the following role play scenario. Discuss your observations with your Protégé or Mentor. Be sure your discussion includes resolution strategies. You may want to write down your strategies – or better, use a video camera or cell phone video to record your strategy and archive it for later viewing as a personal “refresher course”. Scenario: Imagine you are experiencing a problem with your new vehicle that has not been resolved to your satisfaction, for example, your brakes constantly squeak. You want your car’s manufacturer to repair your vehicle. You contact your local Better Business Bureau for arbitration and arrange to use a non-partial Arbitrator to assist you in settling your dispute with your vehicle’s manufacturer. First, you are given several documents to complete which include the nature of your dispute. Next, you will attend a fictitious hearing. Present at this hearing is the consumer, the manufacturer’s representative, and a non-partial Arbitrator. One of you will play the role of the consumer and the other will play the role of manufacturer representative. One of you will also play the role of the non-partial Arbitrator. The consumer and the manufacturer’s representative should do the following during your role play: • State the facts as you see them – your breaks squeak and you want the manufacturer to buy the car back. • Present any documentation in support of your case – you bring a technical experts bulletin. • Address questions to the other party. – you might ask the manufacturer’s rep about the qualifications of the service and repair reps. • Rebut any testimony or evidence presented by the other party – for instance, use the 43
  45. 45. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E technical experts bulletin as evidence. The arbitrator will ask questions to clarify information presented at the hearing and gain a more complete understanding of the dispute. After each will side presents its case and the questioning is completed, you will give a summary of your position, deal with any questions that have not been answered. Tell the arbitrator exactly what you think the decision should be and why. The average arbitration lasts approximately two hours. Remember, the sole purpose of the hearing is to allow the arbitrator to gather and sort the facts in order to make a fair decision. You should be prepared to convince the arbitrator your position is right. Use a video recording device to record your role play to use for refresher training at a later date. It helps to take a positive approach to conflict resolution, where discussion is courteous and non-confrontational, and the focus is on issues rather than on individuals. If this is done, and people listen carefully and explore facts, issues and possible solutions properly, conflict can often be resolved effectively. 44
  46. 46. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E FEBRUARY MONTH 11 The Appreciative Inquiry proposes that development is fostered by focusing on past successes and learning how to replicate those successes in current and future endeavors. The purpose of using this tool is to learn from past successes and understand how to adapt successful actions in new initiatives. ACTIVITY: Ask the mentee to devote a few minutes to sharing with you the following: Think of an occasion, an event or a significant achievement on your part during the past year (whether in your personal or professional life) that was a source of satisfaction or pride in yourself, or a story which might provide inspiration for you and your peers in the future. Review the event in your mind and recall what it was that made that success possible (the environment, some aspect of your own conduct, relationships with others, your personal qualities, etc. The interviewer (mentor) asks the interviewee (protégé ) the following questions: (This exercise should be completed in 10 minutes): • Describe your success story without undue modesty. • Define a landmark moment in your success story, when you felt you had made a breakthrough. • What personal values did you employ through the experience and in your story? • Which elements contributed to your success? (Describe at least 10 elements). • Choose a change (in your personal or working life) that you would like to bring about in the near future and describe it briefly. • Together, think of a plan of action to implement three of the above elements of your success in that change. • Make a note of the learned conclusions for the future. 45
  47. 47. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T MARCH MONTH 12 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Mentorship Evaluation The purpose of conducting any evaluation is "to answer practical questions of decision-makers and program implementers who want to know whether to continue a program, extend it to other areas, modify it, or close it down. Goal: Provide and deploy aligned measures and accountability systems for leaders to achieve world class standards. Excerpted from the JHSMH 2007LEM The Four Pillars of Excellence at Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare are: 1) People 2) Quality 3) Stewardship 4) Growth …and these are excellent markers to use in any evaluation. They set the standard for achievement in leadership and practice at Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare. This is the last month in terms of activities in your mentoring relationship, but it is by no means the end of it. Take some time to reflect on the previous months, and enjoy the fruits of your labor. Please complete the measurement activities on the next page. 46
  48. 48. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ACTIVITY: • Select two key activities from the mentor guidebook that can be focused on in the coming months in your leadership development. Develop an action plan based on these activities. • Complete the attached evaluation form you will receive from the a manager from Training & Development. When completing this activity, keep the Four Pillars of Excellence in mind. Share your findings with your mentor/protégé. • Visit the links from the resource list on the next page. They offer valuable insight on assessment and evaluation. 47
  49. 49. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E Website: http://www.managementhelp.org/aboutfml/diagnostics.htm Selecting Assessment Tools Assessing Your For-Profit Organization Assessing Your Nonprofit Organization A Diagnostic Model to Analyze Results of Your Organizational Assessment Assessing Your Own Personal and Professional Development Assessing Performance of Employees in Your Organization Assessing Performance of Groups (Teams) in Your Organization Other Types of Assessment Tools 48
  50. 50. I N N O V A T I V E M A N A G E M E N T 1 2 M O N T H S T O P E A K P E R F O R M A N C E ………………..United States Coast Guard 49

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