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Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652
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Sayre2e ch21 integrated_lecture_pp_ts-150652

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This powerpoint is housed on SlideShare. It supplements chapter 21, which is on this week's reading list.

This powerpoint is housed on SlideShare. It supplements chapter 21, which is on this week's reading list.

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  • Jean-Antoine Watteau. The Embarkation from Cythera . ca. 1718-19. 50-3/4" × 76-3/8”.
  • Gianlorenzo Bernini. Aerial view of Bernini's Colonnade circumscribing the Piazza (square) before St. Peter's Basilica, looking eastward towards Mussolini's Via della Conciliazione and the Tiber River. 1656-67.
  • Carlo Maderno. St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican, Rome: Façade. 1914.
  • Michelangelo. Plan for St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican, Rome. 1546-64.
  • Maderno. Plan for St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican, Rome. 1607-12.
  • Map: Central Italy, with inset map of Vatican, Rome, ca. 1600.
  • What is the Baroque? As part of its strategy to respond to the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Church in Rome championed a new Baroque style of art that appealed to the range of human emotion and feeling, not just the intellect. Bernini’s majestic new colonnade for the square in front of Saint Peter’s in Rome helped to reveal the grandeur of the basilica itself, creating the dramatic effect of the Church embracing its flock. How does his sculptural program for the Cornaro Chapel in Rome epitomize the Baroque? How are Baroque sensibilities reflected in his sculpture of the biblical hero David? How do action, excitement, and sensuality fulfill the Counter-Reformation objectives in Baroque religious art? What role do the senses play in the theological writings of Saint Ignatius? What role does art play in his set of “Rules”? How is this reflected in Andrea Pozzo’s ceiling for the church of Sant’Ignazio? One of the most influential pieces of Baroque architecture is Francesco Borromini’s Church of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane in Rome. Borromini replaces the traditions of Renaissance architecture with a facade of dramatic oppositions and visual surprises. How does the architecture of Bernini and Borromini express the theatrical urge to draw the viewer into the drama?
  • Gianlorenzo Bernini. Baldachino, at crossing of St. Peter's, Vatican, Rome. 1624-33. Height: approx. 100’.
  • Anonymous. Painted view of Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria della Vittoria , Rome, including Bernini's Ecstasy of St. Theresa . ca. 1654. 5’ 6-1/4" × 3’ 1/4”.
  • Gianlorenzo Bernini. Ecstasy of St. Theresa , Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome. 1654-52. Height: 11’ 6”.
  • Gianlorenzo Bernini. David . 1623. Height: 5’ 7”.
  • Gianlorenzo Bernini. Fountain of the Four Rivers , representing the Nile, the Danube, the Ganges, and the Plata rivers, each carved by a different member of Bernini's workshop. Piazza Navona, Rome. 1648-51.
  • Giacomo della Porta. Il Gesù, Rome: Façade. ca. 1575-84.
  • Leon Battista Alberti. Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Italy: Façade. 1458-70.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . Detail, America. 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . Detail, Saint Ignatius. 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . Detail, Europe. 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . Detail, Africa. 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . Detail, Saint Francia Xavier. 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzo's Apotheosis of Saint Ignatius of Loyola . Detail, Asia. 1691-94. Approx. 56' × 115’.
  • Francesco Borromini. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome. Façade. 1665-67.
  • Francesco Borromini. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome. Plan. 1665-67.
  • Francesco Borromini. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome. Interior, dome. 1665-67.
  • How does the Baroque style manifest itself in painting? Caravaggio used the play of light and dark to create paintings of stunning drama and energy that reveal a new Baroque taste for vividly realistic detail. His followers, among them Elisabetta Sirani and Artemisia Gentileschi, inherited his interest in realism and the dramatic. What does Caravaggio share with the mystical writings of Teresa of Ávila and the poetry of Englishman John Donne? What social conditions and aesthetic values of the Italian Baroque particularly interested the artists Elisabetta Sirani and Artemisia Gentileschi?
  • Caravaggio. The Calling of Saint Matthew . ca. 1599-1600. 11’ 1" × 11’ 5”.
  • Caravaggio. Conversion of Saint Paul . ca. 1601. 90-1/2" × 68-7/8”.
  • Caravaggio. Bacchus . ca. 1597. 37-3/8" × 33-1/2”.
  • Elisabetta Sirani. Virgin and Child . 1663. 34" × 27-1/2”.
  • Artemisia Gentileschi. Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes . ca. 1625. 72-1/2" × 55-3/4”.
  • How is the Baroque style manifest in music, particularly in Venice? If Rome was the center of Baroque art and architecture, Venice was the center of Baroque music. Giovanni Gabrieli took advantage of the sonority of Saint Mark’s Cathedral to create canzonas in which he carefully controlled the dynamics (loud/soft) of the composition and its tempo. What is a canzona? It was in Venice that a new form of musical drama known as opera was born in the hands of Claudio Monteverdi, who gave text precedence over harmony for the first time in the history of Western music. His opera Orfeo successfully married music and drama. What is an opera? The sonata, popularized as an instrumental genre by virtuoso violinist Arcangelo Corelli, provided a model for all instrumental music. Finally, Antonio Vivaldi perfected the concerto as a genre, and many of his concertos were performed by the women at the Ospedale della Pietà, where he was musical director. What are the chief features of the concerto? In general, what features of Venetian Baroque music are analogous to Baroque painting and sculpture?
  • Gentile Bellini. Procession of the Reliquary of the True Cross in Piazza San Marco . Detail, including Venetian musical instruments. 1496. 12'-1/2" × 24’ 5-1/4”.
  • Musical lines from Arcangelo Corelli's Opus no.5 (violin sonata).
  • Jacopo Guarana. Apollo Conducting a Choir of Maidens . 1776.
  • Diagram: Ritornello.
  • Check this link…
  • Gianlorenzo Bernini. Continuity & Change: Design for the east facade of the Palais du Louvre, Paris. 1664.
  • Louis Le Vau; Claude Perrault; Charles Le Brun. Continuity & Change: East façade, Palais du Louvre, Paris. 1667-70.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Jean-Antoine Watteau. The Embarkation from Cythera. ca. 1718-19.50-3/4" × 76-3/8”.
    • 2. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gianlorenzo Bernini. Aerial view of Berninis Colonnade circumscribing thePiazza (square) before St. Peters Basilica, looking eastward towardsMussolinis Via della Conciliazione and the Tiber River. 1656-67.
    • 3. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Carlo Maderno. St. Peters Basilica, Vatican, Rome: Façade. 1914.
    • 4. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Michelangelo. Plan for St. Peters Basilica, Vatican, Rome. 1546-64.
    • 5. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Maderno. Plan for St. Peters Basilica, Vatican, Rome. 1607-12.
    • 6.  Architectural Panorama: St Peter’s Basilica (ROME, ITALY, FAÇADE 1607-1 Architectural Simulation: St. Peter’s Basilica External Video: Designing St. Peter’sMyArtsLabChapter 21 – The Baroque in Italy: the Church and Its Appeal
    • 7. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Map: Central Italy, with inset map of Vatican, Rome, ca. 1600.
    • 8. Baroque Style and the Counter-ReformationWhat is the Baroque?• Sculpture and Architecture: Bernini and His Followers —Bernini’s baldachino helps to define the altar space of Saint Peter’sBasilica. Probably no image sums up the Baroque movement betterthan Bernini’s sculptural program for the Cornaro Chapel. His theme isa pivotal moment in the life of Teresa of Avila. Action is central toBaroque representation as seen in hi David. Bernini is responsible fora series of figurative fountains that changed the face of Rome.• The Society of Jesus — Founded by Ignatius of Loyola, the Jesuits,as they were known, led the Counter-Reformation. All agreed that thepurpose of religious art was to teach and inspire the faithful, that itshould always be intelligible and realistic, and that it should be anemotional stimulus to piety.
    • 9. • Another feature of the Baroque is surprise as can be seen in theChurch of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane.• Discussion Question: What architectural features constitute the“grandeur” of Saint Peter’s?
    • 10. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gianlorenzo Bernini. Baldachino, at crossing of St. Peters, Vatican, Rome.1624-33.Height: approx. 100’.
    • 11.  Architectural Simulation: Cornaro ChapelMyArtsLabChapter 21 – The Baroque in Italy: the Church and Its Appeal
    • 12. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Anonymous. Painted view of Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria della Vittoria,Rome, including Berninis Ecstasy of St. Theresa. ca. 1654.5’ 6-1/4" × 3’ 1/4”.
    • 13. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gianlorenzo Bernini. Ecstasy of St. Theresa, Cornaro Chapel, Santa Mariadella Vittoria, Rome. 1654-52.Height: 11’ 6”.
    • 14. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gianlorenzo Bernini. David. 1623.Height: 5’ 7”.
    • 15. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gianlorenzo Bernini. Fountain of the Four Rivers, representing the Nile, theDanube, the Ganges, and the Plata rivers, each carved by a differentmember of Berninis workshop. Piazza Navona, Rome. 1648-51.
    • 16. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Giacomo della Porta. Il Gesù, Rome: Façade. ca. 1575-84.
    • 17. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Leon Battista Alberti. Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Italy: Façade. 1458-70.
    • 18. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. Detail, America. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 19. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. Detail, Saint Ignatius. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 20. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. Detail, Europe. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 21. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 22. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. Detail, Africa. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 23. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. Detail, Saint Francia Xavier. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 24. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Andrea Pozzo. Closer Look: Andrea Pozzos Apotheosis of Saint Ignatiusof Loyola. Detail, Asia. 1691-94.Approx. 56 × 115’.
    • 25. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Francesco Borromini. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome. Façade.1665-67.
    • 26. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Francesco Borromini. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome. Plan. 1665-67.
    • 27. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Francesco Borromini. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, Rome. Interior,dome. 1665-67.
    • 28. The Drama of Painting: Caravaggio and theCarravaggistiHow does the Baroque style manifest itself in painting?• Master of Light and Dark: Caravaggio — The most dramaticelement of The Calling of Saint Matthew is light. The revelatory powerof light is analogous to the transformative power of faith. One of theclearest instances of Caravaggio’s uses of light to dramatize momentsof conversion is the Conversion of Saint Paul.• Elisabetta Sirani and Artemisia Gentileschi: CaravaggistiWomen — Caravaggio had a profound influence on other artists of theseventeenth century. Sirani painted portraits, religious works,allegorical works, and occasionally mythological works and stories fromancient history. Gentileschi was one of the first women artists toachieve an international reputation. She painted five separate versionsof the biblical story of Judith and Holofernes.• Discussion Question: Discuss the revolutionary innovations ofCaravaggio’s style, and his influence.
    • 29. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Caravaggio. The Calling of Saint Matthew. ca. 1599-1600.11’ 1" × 11’ 5”.
    • 30. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Caravaggio. Conversion of Saint Paul. ca. 1601.90-1/2" × 68-7/8”.
    • 31. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Caravaggio. Bacchus. ca. 1597.37-3/8" × 33-1/2”.
    • 32. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Elisabetta Sirani. Virgin and Child. 1663.34" × 27-1/2”.
    • 33. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Artemisia Gentileschi. Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes.ca. 1625.72-1/2" × 55-3/4”.
    • 34.  Active Listening Guide: A. Gabrieli: Ricercara 4 del duodecimo tuonoMyArtsLabChapter 21 – The Baroque in Italy: the Church and Its Appeal
    • 35. Venice and Baroque MusicHow is the Baroque style manifest in music, particularly in Venice?• Giovanni Gabrieli and the Drama of Harmony — Venice earnedits place at the center of the musical world largely through the efforts ofGabrieli. He was among the first to write religious music intendedspecifically for wind ensemble.• Claudio Monteverdi and the Birth of Opera — Monteverdi wasthe musical director at Saint Mark’s in Venice where he mastered anew, text-based musical form, the opera. The inspiration for his firstopera, Orfeo, was the musical drama of ancient Greek theater.
    • 36. • Arcangelo Corelli and the Sonata — In Italian, sonata simplymeans “that which is sounded,” or played by instruments, as opposedto that which is sung, the cantata.• Antonio Vivaldi and the Concerto — Corelli’s instrumental flairinfluenced Venice’s most important composer, Vivaldi. Many of hisworks were written specifically for performance by girl choirs andinstrumental ensembles. Vivaldi specialized in composing concertos, athree-movement secular form of instrumental music.• Discussion Question: How does Baroque music differ from the music ofthe Renaissance?
    • 37. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gentile Bellini. Procession of the Reliquary of the True Cross in Piazza SanMarco. Detail, including Venetian musical instruments. 1496.12-1/2" × 24’ 5-1/4”.
    • 38.  Closer Look: The ViolinMyArtsLabChapter 21 – The Baroque in Italy: the Church and Its Appeal
    • 39.  Active Listening Guide: Monteverdi: "Tu semorta" from OrfeoMyArtsLabChapter 21 – The Baroque in Italy: the Church and Its Appeal
    • 40. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Musical lines from Arcangelo Corellis Opus no.5 (violin sonata).
    • 41. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Jacopo Guarana. Apollo Conducting a Choir of Maidens. 1776.
    • 42. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Diagram: Ritornello.
    • 43.  Active Listening Guide: Vivaldi: Spring, Ifrom The Four SeasonsMyArtsLabChapter 21 – The Baroque in Italy: the Church and Its Appeal
    • 44. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Gianlorenzo Bernini. Continuity & Change: Design for the east facade ofthe Palais du Louvre, Paris. 1664.
    • 45. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Inc.Louis Le Vau; Claude Perrault; Charles Le Brun. Continuity & Change:East façade, Palais du Louvre, Paris. 1667-70.

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