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Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
Persuasive writing ii
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Persuasive writing ii

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  • 1. By Ms. M. Hudson Resurrection of Our Lord School Persuasive Writing: The 5-Paragraph Essay
  • 2. Persuasive essays
    • Are ideal for presenting opinions that require extensive support.
    • Should be considered when there are two or more supporting reasons.
    • Are often called argumentative essays.
    • In the 5-paragraph essay, there are three supporting reasons.
  • 3. Where do I begin? You begin the same way you did when considering just one paragraph.
  • 4. The Writing Process
    • Let’s begin here.
  • 5. Paragraph Components
    • In Persuasive Writing
  • 6. Prewriting
    • If you cannot think of a persuasive topic, make a list of issues that interest you.
    • Do not think about the list. Simply write. Jot down key words or draw pictures to help you generate a list of issues.
    • However, if you have a topic in mind, begin a list of pros and cons.
  • 7. Prewriting Sample
    • Generating a list
    • Using Pros & Cons –
    • No School Uniforms
    • No School Uniforms
    • Banned Books
    • Violence in Television
    • Modified School Lunch
    • Abolish Standardized Tests
    • Pros
    • Uniforms limit expression.
    • Uniforms do not guarantee safety.
    • Cons
    • Uniforms instill discipline.
    • Uniforms are inexpensive.
  • 8. Prewriting II: Research Before you move to the second stage of the writing process, research your topic. Make sure there is enough reliable information to support a strong persuasive essay. You can visit the local library , view online collections , contact experts , conduct interviews , and survey opinion . If your research does not yield sufficient infor- mation, you should return to the initial pre- writing stage to find a new topic.
  • 9. First Draft
    • Once you select a topic and identify your three supporting reasons, WRITE!
    • You should, though, begin with your body paragraphs – the paragraphs that contain your supporting reasons. Write those paragraphs first, making certain that each has all the components of effective paragraph writing.
    • You can return to your draft later to write the introductory and concluding paragraphs.
  • 10. Paragraph Outline
    • In Persuasive Writing
  • 11. Persuasive Outline at a Glance
    • Introductory Paragraph
    • 1 st Supporting Reason
    • 2 nd Supporting Reason
    • 3 rd Supporting Reason
    • Concluding Paragraph
  • 12. I. Introductory Paragraph
    • Captures the reader’s attention – with a short story, an
    • interesting fact or statistic.
    • B. Introduces the main idea of the essay
    • (the position statement).
    • A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one.
  • 13. II. 1 st Supporting Reason (Body)
    • Includes your first supporting reason.
    • Uses evidence – expert opinion, statistic, fact, example,
    • quotation – to support your first reason.
    • Other sentences that give details to support the reason.
    • A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one.
  • 14. III. 2 nd Supporting Reason (Body)
    • Includes your second supporting reason.
    • Uses evidence – expert opinion, statistic, fact, example,
    • quotation – to support your first reason.
    • Other sentences that give details to support the reason.
    • A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one.
  • 15. IV. 3 rd Supporting Reason (Body)
    • Includes your third supporting reason.
    • Uses evidence – expert opinion, statistic, fact, example,
    • quotation – to support your first reason.
    • Other sentences that give details to support the reason.
    • A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one.
  • 16. V. Concluding Paragraph
    • Restates the main idea (position statement).
    • Leave the reader with an IMPRESSION – something that persuades; it may be a reminder of fact or a statement.
  • 17. Revision
    • In the third stage of the writing process, review draft for content.
    • Do you have three supporting reasons?
    • Are the reasons strong and justified with valid and varied evidence?
    • Is the evidence used related to the reason?
    • Are the words selected carefully and purposefully?
    • Is the sentence length varied?
    • Does the writing possess transitional words and sentences?
  • 18. Transitional Words & Phrases
    • after
    • before
    • because
    • although
    • now
    • therefore
    • however
    • though
    • above all
    • according to
    • for example
    • for instance
    • then
    • furthermore
    • first, second, third
    • additionally
    • next
    • consequently
    • subsequently
    • as a result
    • as a matter of fact
    • all in all
    • in conclusion
    • since
  • 19. Proofreading
    • In the fourth stage of the writing process, edit writing for basic grammar.
    • Is the first line of every paragraph indented?
    • Does every sentence begin with a capital letter?
    • Does each sentence end with a punctuation mark appropriate for the type of sentence.
    • Are other punctuation marks used correctly – commas, colons, semi-colons, dashes, apostrophes, etc.?
    • Do subjects agree with their verbs?
    • Is there a consistent verb tense throughout the writing?
  • 20. Write Time!
    • At this point in the lesson, you should have selected a topic or an issue and conducted research to determine its validity.
    Now, it is time to begin the first draft.

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