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Unit 25, Lesson 6
 

Unit 25, Lesson 6

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    Unit 25, Lesson 6 Unit 25, Lesson 6 Presentation Transcript

    • Think about size as an attribute. Characteristics or qualities, such as size, parts, color, function. What are Attributes? What is the size of a pencil?
    • What is the size of a windmill? Fits in your hand
    • So why is size an attribute? Because size is a quality of an object (or thing) that tells us more about it. Size, like all attributes, also helps us build associations between words. tall
    • See how SIZE builds associations… A skyscraper is bigger than a house which is bigger than a shack. That’s one set of associations in your head that’s based on your understanding of the size of these things. What about animals? Polar bears are bigger than….which are bigger than…..?
    • Think about function as an attribute. The function of something is WHAT IT DOES. What is the function of a pencil? It is used to write or draw.
    • What is the function of a windmill? So why is function an attribute? Because function is a quality of an object (or thing) that tells us more about it. Also, just like an object’s size, an object’s FUNCTION, also helps us build associations between words. It catches wind energy to make electricity.
    • See how FUNCTION builds associations…
      • A calculator is used to perform simple mathematical operations while a smart phone (like an iphone) is used to text, make phone calls, surf the internet, and play games.
      • That’s one set of associations in your head that’s based on your understanding of the size of these things.
      How is the FUNCTION of a computer different than the function of a calculator? How is it different than that of a smart phone?
    • What is an attribute for… A circle? Electricity? A paragraph?
    • Degrees of Meaning
    • Expression of the Day “ Do you think Mom will drive us to the dance?” asked Elisa. “Fat chance!” Ramon replied.
    • Step 4: Grammar & Usage
      • Let’s review the four types of sentences:
      • Declarative (.)
      • Interrogative (?)
      • Imperative (.)
      • Exclamatory (!)
      A declarative sentence states a fact or opinion. The end punctuation is a period. Gulliver likes to chew on toys.
    • An interrogative sentence asks a question. The end punctuation is a question mark. Would you like to go for a walk? An imperative sentence gives a command. The end punctuation is a period. Go get your toy.
    • An exclamatory sentence expresses strong emotion. The end punctuation is an exclamation point. Good boy!
      • Turn to p. 39 in the iTEXT (floppy).
      • Read each sentence.
      • Think about its purpose and decide if the sentence is declarative, interrogative, imperative, or exclamatory.
      • Compound Sentences are made up of two sentences joined by a conjunction.
      • The two sentences are independent clauses. They are usually joined by the conjunctions and , but , or or .
      • How could you combine the following 2 sentences?
      • Great poems have universal themes.
      • They take many forms.
      • Great poems have universal themes, but they take many forms.
      • Why do we use the conjunction but ?
    • Besides using a comma and a conjunction, what’s another way we know how to combine 2 independent clauses? ;;;;;;;;;Using a semicolon;;;;;;;;;;;;
      • A semicolon takes the place of the conjunction and, but, or or.
      • The word after a semicolon is NOT capitalized.
    • Try it out; it’s easier than you think! Here are 2 independent clauses: These poems make me think about life. They help me see things differently. Combine them using a semicolon. Did you get this?.... These poems make me think about life; they help me see things differently. The ideas in the two sentences are closely related. The semicolon signals this relationship.
      • Turn to Exercise 4 on p. 40 in the iTEXT.
      • Read each pair of sentences.
      • Decide if the ideas in the 2 sentences are closely related.
      • If the sentences are closely related, rewrite the sentences to form a compound sentence using a semicolon.