Quality Counts:Developing a Game for Information Literacy Instruction<br />Maura A. Smale<br />Assistant Professor, Inform...
Games:theoriginal educational technology<br />
the important question is not can games be used to support learning, but how<br />
Mission Statement<br />The CUNY Games Network connects educators from every campus and discipline at CUNY who are interest...
Barriers to using games in education<br />Time<br /><ul><li> for instructors to learn
 for students to learn</li></ul>Access<br /><ul><li> to games (video, board, etc.)
 to hardware</li></ul>Cost of materials<br />Student interest<br />Support<br /><ul><li> pedagogical
 technological (if needed)				 (deFreitas 2006)</li></li></ul><li>
ACRL Information Literacy Standard Three<br />The information literate student evaluates information and its sources criti...
Learning Objectives<br />After playing the Quality Counts game, students will:<br />Understand the importance of criticall...
Equipment<br /><ul><li> Whiteboard and markers
 Computer classroom with internet access
 (Index cards)
 Small candies, stickers or other prizes</li></li></ul><li>Gameplay(75 min session)<br />Introduction: 15 minutes<br /><ul...
Groups will search for information
1 member of your group will report back to the class</li></li></ul><li>Rules<br /><ul><li>Search for information on the in...
Find 2 sources on the research topic
Sources must meet quality criteria
1 point for each criteria met successfully
Write web addresses on index cards
Group with the most points WINS!</li></li></ul><li>
Candy = good<br />
English Comp Class 1<br />Research Topic: Location-aware devices<br />• http://www8.garmin.com/aboutGPS/<br />• http://msd...
English Comp Class 2<br />Research Topic: Brooklyn History<br />• http://www.brooklynhistory.org<br />• http://www.census....
Partial credit<br />
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Quality Counts: Developing a Game for Information Literacy Instruction

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Presentation for the 2010 ACRL New England Library Instruction Group's annual program.

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Quality Counts: Developing a Game for Information Literacy Instruction

  1. 1. Quality Counts:Developing a Game for Information Literacy Instruction<br />Maura A. Smale<br />Assistant Professor, Information Literacy Librarian<br />NYC College of Technology, CUNY<br />New England Library Instruction Group Annual Program<br />June 4, 2010<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Games:theoriginal educational technology<br />
  4. 4. the important question is not can games be used to support learning, but how<br />
  5. 5. Mission Statement<br />The CUNY Games Network connects educators from every campus and discipline at CUNY who are interested in games, simulations, and other forms of interactive teaching. Our long-term goals are to facilitate the pedagogical uses of both digital and non-digital games in order to improve student success, and encourage further research and scholarship in the developing field of games-based learning.<br />http://cunygames.wordpress.com/<br />
  6. 6. Barriers to using games in education<br />Time<br /><ul><li> for instructors to learn
  7. 7. for students to learn</li></ul>Access<br /><ul><li> to games (video, board, etc.)
  8. 8. to hardware</li></ul>Cost of materials<br />Student interest<br />Support<br /><ul><li> pedagogical
  9. 9. technological (if needed) (deFreitas 2006)</li></li></ul><li>
  10. 10. ACRL Information Literacy Standard Three<br />The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.<br />
  11. 11. Learning Objectives<br />After playing the Quality Counts game, students will:<br />Understand the importance of critically evaluating information used in their coursework. <br />Identify appropriate criteria for evaluating information sources such as accuracy, expertise, currency, objectivity, and relevance.<br />Evaluate information sources using appropriate criteria.<br />Recognize that reference librarians can provide assistance with evaluating information and other research questions.<br />
  12. 12. Equipment<br /><ul><li> Whiteboard and markers
  13. 13. Computer classroom with internet access
  14. 14. (Index cards)
  15. 15. Small candies, stickers or other prizes</li></li></ul><li>Gameplay(75 min session)<br />Introduction: 15 minutes<br /><ul><li> present rules, select criteria </li></ul>Student research: 15 minutes<br />Report back: 40 minutes<br />Wrap-up: 5 minutes<br /><ul><li> distribute prizes</li></li></ul><li>Gameplay<br /><ul><li>I will divide you into groups
  16. 16. Groups will search for information
  17. 17. 1 member of your group will report back to the class</li></li></ul><li>Rules<br /><ul><li>Search for information on the internet
  18. 18. Find 2 sources on the research topic
  19. 19. Sources must meet quality criteria
  20. 20. 1 point for each criteria met successfully
  21. 21. Write web addresses on index cards
  22. 22. Group with the most points WINS!</li></li></ul><li>
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25. Candy = good<br />
  26. 26. English Comp Class 1<br />Research Topic: Location-aware devices<br />• http://www8.garmin.com/aboutGPS/<br />• http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ <br />dd938890.aspx<br />• http://autos.aol.com/article/vehicle-tracking-device/<br />• A survey on sensor localization by Wang, Jing; Ghosh, R.; Das, Sajal. Journal of Control Theory and Applications, February 2010, Vol. 8 Issue: Number 1 p2-11 (via EBSCO)<br />
  27. 27. English Comp Class 2<br />Research Topic: Brooklyn History<br />• http://www.brooklynhistory.org<br />• http://www.census.gov<br />• http://www.thirteen.org/brooklyn/history<br />• A History of the City of Brooklyn, c. 1867 (via Google Books)<br />• CUNY+ library catalog<br />
  28. 28.
  29. 29. Partial credit<br />
  30. 30. Index cards ≠ poker<br />
  31. 31. Library sources =(???!!!)<br />
  32. 32. Did you enjoy playing the evaluating sources game in class earlier this semester? Why or why not?<br />n = 25<br />
  33. 33. Do you feel that you gained in skill in evaluating websites and other internet information sources after playing the game in class? Why or why not?<br />n = 25<br />
  34. 34. Which do you prefer: to learn about course material in a traditional lesson in which the instructor demonstrates and explains to the class, or to learn the material by playing a game like this one? Why?<br />n = 25<br />
  35. 35. Take the plunge:use games for instruction!<br />
  36. 36. msmale@citytech.cuny.edu<br />
  37. 37. References<br />Clyde, J., and Thomas, C. (2008). Building an information literacy first-person shooter. Reference Services Review, 36, 366-380.<br />Crawford, C. (1982). The art of computer game design. Retrieved from http://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/fac/peabody/game-book/Coverpage.html<br />deFrietas, S. (2006). Learning in immersive worlds: A review of game-based learning. Retrieved from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearninginnovation/gamingreport_v3.pdf<br />Leach, G.J., and Sugarman, T.S. (2006). Play to win! Using games in library instruction to enhance student learning. Research Strategies, 20, 191-203.<br />Markey, K., Swanson, F., Jenkins., A., Jennings, B.J., St. Jean, B., Rosenberg, V., Yao, X., and R.L. Frost. (2008). Designing and testing a web-based board game for teaching information literacy skills and concepts. Library Hi Tech, 26, 663-681.<br />Squire, K.D. (2005). Changing the game: What happens when videogames enter the classroom?Innovate, 1(6).<br />VanLeer, L. (2006). Interactive gaming vs. library tutorials for information literacy: A resource guide. Indiana Libraries, 25(4), 52-55.<br />Waelchli, P. (2008). Leveling up: Increasing information literacy through videogame strategies. In A. Harris and S.E. Rice (Eds.), Gaming in academic libraries (pp. 212-228). Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries.<br />Walker, B.E. (2008). This is jeopardy! An exciting approach to learning in library instruction. Reference Services Review, 36, 381-388.<br />
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