© 2012 MSLGROUP P1
SOCIAL & DIGITAL MEDIA:
CHANGING FOOD CULTURE
Selected Opportunities for
Food & Beverage Marketers
© 2012 MSLGROUP P2
MSLGROUP Americas:
FOOD &
BEVERAGE
SPECIALTY
Food and beverage marketing and PR
• Category leader in di...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P3
FOOD & NUTRITION TRENDS 2012
Our Annual Food Trends Forecast
© 2012 MSLGROUP P4
• Principal provider of global research
on consumer culture, behaviors, trends
and demand and a leading...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P5
FEATURING DATA AND INSIGHTS FROM CLICKS & CRAVINGS
A Hartman Group and MSLGROUP AMERICAS Syndicated Stu...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P6
QUALITATIVE AND
QUANTITATIVE STUDY
Ethnographic, in-home studies
• 25 studies in Seattle and Chicago
• ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P7
INDEX
TRANSFORMING FOOD CULTURE
An antidote to isolation
“Someone like me”
An architecture of influence...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P8
NEW MODES OF FOOD
CULTURE ACQUISITION
TRADITIONS
(meal planning)
Media, travel,
retailers, restaurants
...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P9
ALMOST
HALF
Of consumers learn about
food via social networking
sites, such as Twitter and
Facebook
• U...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P10
Consumers formerly
rely most heavily on mom
and family traditions for
meal planning
Now search online ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P11
A DIGITAL EXPERIENCE OF FOOD
• Digital food selection is less of a sensory experience
• More of a visu...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P12
• Rethink every assumption
about food marketing
• Don’t assume continuity
of food traditions
• The big...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P13
INDEX
AN ANTIDOTE TO ISOLATION
Transforming food culture
“Someone like me”
An architecture of influenc...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P14
INTIMACY IN ABSENTIA
Contemporary life often finds
us far from family and friends
Social media turns i...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P15
Social media is becoming our standby mealtime companion
“There’s no dining table … We all eat
on the c...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P16
CONNECTED EATING: FOIL TO ISOLATION
Texted with a friend or family member
Used a social networking sit...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P17
A CURE FOR THE ISOLATION
OF MOTHERHOOD
Social media engagement
rises significantly with
motherhood
• A...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P18
OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS
Dive deep and understand
if there is a place for your
brand at the table
• Ca...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P19
INDEX
“SOMEONE LIKE ME”
Transforming food culture
An antidote to isolation
An architecture of influenc...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P20
KATIE
• Gluten-free
• Avid baker
• Loves to
entertain
WHAT DO PEOPLE LIKE ME
THINK AND DO?
Consumers a...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P21
Expertise and reliability are created through:
PEOPLE “LIKE ME”
RATINGS: When people
approve of you
MA...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P22
TWO TYPES OF REAL
The home-grown
expert blogger
The personable
celebrity
My foodiest friend My mom
Opi...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P23
TWO TYPES OF REAL
Opinions of the masses as “real people”
© 2012 MSLGROUP P24
OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS
Recognize what you are not
• Brands are not people
• At best, they are connec...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P25
An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX
AN ARCHITECTURE OF INFLUENCE
Transforming food culture
A...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P26
THREE PROTOTYPES & THEIR ROLES
Spectator
384 friends
Dreamer
1,100 friends
Doer
7,000 friends
© 2012 MSLGROUP P27
THE SPECTATOR
The Spectator
Social media is life
as lived today
• Consumes content
• Socializes
Julie ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P28
The Dreamer
Active social media user
• Consumes people
• Curates content
Lisa is very social
Lisa cura...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P29
The Doer
Core in both food
& social media
• Creates content
• Inspires followers
THE DOER
Natalie is a...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P30
OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS
CONSUMER
BRAND
INFLUENCER
REVIEW
Segment communications by
type but address t...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P31
Online media now the dominant source of food
information
An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P32
Spend more time engaged online about food
Equally engaged with online and print about food
Spend more ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P33
MULTIPLE MEDIA REMAIN RELEVANT
31%
29%
28%
25%
25%
24%
17%
15%
13%
13%
12%
9%
7%
Food Resources Used i...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P34
FUTURE: Among Millennials, online recipe resources
now more valuable than cookbooks or food shows
on T...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P35
Don’t bet on any one medium at this point
Gear strategy to generation, especially when
it comes to pri...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P36
Social media is a FOOD
discovery medium
An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX
FOOD DISCOVERY
T...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P37
SOCIAL MEDIA DISCOVERS
New restaurants to try
Restaurants to avoid
Meal planning (e.g., new recipes to...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P38
Join the consumer journey and share your discoveries
Reveal a steady stream of welcome information
Tie...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P39
Social media transforms the path to and from
purchase
Social media is a FOOD
discovery medium
An archi...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P40
A NEW PATH TO PURCHASE
Forrester model
Purchase Funnel gives way to Connected Circle
© 2012 MSLGROUP P41
“RESEARCH” BEFORE TRYING OR BUYING
We use social media to mitigate risk
• To get the best value and ma...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P42
We add our experiences and opinions to the user-generated
review process
• Usually when we’re really u...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P43
EXAMPLE: LEIGH BUYS A GRILL
• Pre-shop experience:
• Broadly queried Facebook
friends about grills
• R...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P44
EXAMPLE: LEIGH BUYS A GRILL
• Leigh chooses a Weber Summit Series grill
© 2012 MSLGROUP P45
EXAMPLE: LEIGH BUYS A GRILL
• Post-shop experience:
• Posted pictures of the grill on
Facebook
• Poste...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P46
Think about more closely integrating shopper
marketing with social media functions
• Consumers have cl...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P47
Influence is accorded
TO “Real People”
Social media is a FOOD
discovery medium
An architecture of infl...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P48
INFLUENCE STARTS
WITH A PERSON
Consumers prefer to hear
from people who eat food,
not entities who sel...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P49
Consumers follow people on Twitter, become friends on
Facebook and read blogs of people with:
• Authen...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P50
36%
INFLUENCE TRACKS TO INTIMACY
F18a. Which of these would be likely to lead you to consider purchasi...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P51
WHAT IS REAL?
Real is Relevant (quality)
• Exceptional product that delivers on its promise consistent...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P52
WHAT IS REAL?
Real Shares (knowledge)
• Offers information, humor, beauty, soulfulness and generosity
...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P53
Strictly Transactional
(lowest price  substitutable)
Personal Relationship
(real people  loyalty)
“L...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P54
Benefits of coupons & deals
• Consumers want to save money
• Easy way for people to take notice
• Oppo...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P55
PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Benefits of building
real relationships
• Builds a personal and emotional relat...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P56
OPPORTUNITIES
Stay relevant by listening to what consumers want and giving
it to them
Use an engaging ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P57
Consumers welcome two
things from companies:
Deals and recipes
Influence is accorded
TO “Real People”
...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P58
52%
ARE BRANDS WINNING FRIENDS ONLINE?
• If a deal is really good, consumers will use social media to ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P59
PEOPLE HAVE “FRIENDS”
WHO
Most consumers
Individual
Brands/Bloggers
# FRIENDS
200-300
1000+
WHO ARE TH...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P60
BUSINESSES HAVE “LIKES”
What # Likes Who are the likes? Purpose & Meaning
Big Brand Person Mark Bittma...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P61
OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS
Find ways to emulate small and local brands
• Origin stories
• Internal champ...
© 2012 MSLGROUP P62
CONTACTS
Steve Bryant
Director, Food and Beverage
MSLGROUP Americas
Steve.Bryant@mslgroup.com
206.313....
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Social and Digital Media Changing Food Culture

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We track the trend of how social media has transformed food culture drastically over recent times and give you insights into new modes of food culture acquisition, crowdsourcing displacing mom-sourcing, digital experiences of food, different types of users and opportunities for brands.

The presentation features data and insights from Clicks & Cravings, a syndicated study between The Hartman Group and MSLGROUP

Published in: Business, Technology

Transcript of "Social and Digital Media Changing Food Culture"

  1. 1. © 2012 MSLGROUP P1 SOCIAL & DIGITAL MEDIA: CHANGING FOOD CULTURE Selected Opportunities for Food & Beverage Marketers
  2. 2. © 2012 MSLGROUP P2 MSLGROUP Americas: FOOD & BEVERAGE SPECIALTY Food and beverage marketing and PR • Category leader in digital food and nutrition communications Clients nationwide from farm to fork, consumer and industry focused Registered Dietitians on staff; in-house culinary and nutrition center Offices nationwide Part of MSLGROUP, a top-five global PR and events marketing firm Under the Publicis umbrella
  3. 3. © 2012 MSLGROUP P3 FOOD & NUTRITION TRENDS 2012 Our Annual Food Trends Forecast
  4. 4. © 2012 MSLGROUP P4 • Principal provider of global research on consumer culture, behaviors, trends and demand and a leading advisor on market strategy to the world’s best-known brands • The Hartman Group is internationally recognized for breakthrough perspectives on emerging and evolving consumer behaviors in health and wellness, sustainability and food culture THE HARTMAN GROUP
  5. 5. © 2012 MSLGROUP P5 FEATURING DATA AND INSIGHTS FROM CLICKS & CRAVINGS A Hartman Group and MSLGROUP AMERICAS Syndicated Study CLICKS & CRAVINGS:CLICKS & CRAVINGS: The Impact of Social Technology on Food CultureThe Impact of Social Technology on Food Culture In tandem with smart communications counsel, the Clicks & Cravings report is a powerful tool to help brands strategize their approach to social and digital media.
  6. 6. © 2012 MSLGROUP P6 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE STUDY Ethnographic, in-home studies • 25 studies in Seattle and Chicago • Diverse sample (generation, children, SM and food engagement) • $60,000+ HHI (excepting younger Millennials) • Visit followed social media fast and feast National online survey • December 2011; 1641 U.S. online adults, 18-64, nationally representative • Both users and non-users of social media What it isn’t • Analysis of web traffic and usage data • Review of best practices among food & beverage marketers
  7. 7. © 2012 MSLGROUP P7 INDEX TRANSFORMING FOOD CULTURE An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info Food discovery The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  8. 8. © 2012 MSLGROUP P8 NEW MODES OF FOOD CULTURE ACQUISITION TRADITIONS (meal planning) Media, travel, retailers, restaurants and brands introduce us to new tastes, cuisines & possibilities TRANSACTIONS (shopping) Online “research,” shopping and sharing is part of pre-shop to post-shop experience TECHNIQUES (preparing) Video, recipe sites, blogs and our foodie friends are replacing mom and cookbooks TABLE (eating) Virtually break bread through computers and phones (often without a table)
  9. 9. © 2012 MSLGROUP P9 ALMOST HALF Of consumers learn about food via social networking sites, such as Twitter and Facebook • Used to discover new foods, share food experiences, and get advice about food 40% Learn about food via websites, apps or blogs NEW MODES OF FOOD CULTURE ACQUISITION
  10. 10. © 2012 MSLGROUP P10 Consumers formerly rely most heavily on mom and family traditions for meal planning Now search online for what to cook, without ever tasting or smelling CROWDSOURCING DISPLACING MOMSOURCING
  11. 11. © 2012 MSLGROUP P11 A DIGITAL EXPERIENCE OF FOOD • Digital food selection is less of a sensory experience • More of a visual and rational process “What’s on the label?” “What’s in the recipe?” “Show me the picture!”
  12. 12. © 2012 MSLGROUP P12 • Rethink every assumption about food marketing • Don’t assume continuity of food traditions • The big changes we’re seeing can drive big shifts in market share – take risks now to exploit them • Plan for a remade market led by Millennials and the Connected Generation OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS
  13. 13. © 2012 MSLGROUP P13 INDEX AN ANTIDOTE TO ISOLATION Transforming food culture “Someone like me” An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info Food discovery The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  14. 14. © 2012 MSLGROUP P14 INTIMACY IN ABSENTIA Contemporary life often finds us far from family and friends Social media turns isolation into creation • Loneliness motivates people to connect Food is a natural connector • Humans are inherently social eaters which makes social media and food a perfect pair
  15. 15. © 2012 MSLGROUP P15 Social media is becoming our standby mealtime companion “There’s no dining table … We all eat on the couch with the TV, tablets, phones. We hang out all the time so it’s not like we have to talk and eat.” EATING ALONE, BUT TOGETHER When we eat alone, we can still be together 45% of all adult meals are alone 45% 39% of consumers engage in social media while eating, often during lunch 39%
  16. 16. © 2012 MSLGROUP P16 CONNECTED EATING: FOIL TO ISOLATION Texted with a friend or family member Used a social networking site/app AT HOME Used a social networking site/app AWAY FROM HOME DOMINANT REASONS: To stay in touch with friends and family & to relieve boredom 36% 29% 18%
  17. 17. © 2012 MSLGROUP P17 A CURE FOR THE ISOLATION OF MOTHERHOOD Social media engagement rises significantly with motherhood • A second wave of this study will cover moms only
  18. 18. © 2012 MSLGROUP P18 OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS Dive deep and understand if there is a place for your brand at the table • Can mealtime present a chance to talk with your brand’s representatives? Offer consumers company at mealtime Invite consumers to share their meal experiences with communities
  19. 19. © 2012 MSLGROUP P19 INDEX “SOMEONE LIKE ME” Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info Food discovery The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  20. 20. © 2012 MSLGROUP P20 KATIE • Gluten-free • Avid baker • Loves to entertain WHAT DO PEOPLE LIKE ME THINK AND DO? Consumers are tapping into each other’s expertise • Blogs, recipe forums and review sites appeal because they represent the knowledge and experiences of people “like me”
  21. 21. © 2012 MSLGROUP P21 Expertise and reliability are created through: PEOPLE “LIKE ME” RATINGS: When people approve of you MAX FOLLOWERS: When people listen to you MENTIONS: When people talk about you 384 friends
  22. 22. © 2012 MSLGROUP P22 TWO TYPES OF REAL The home-grown expert blogger The personable celebrity My foodiest friend My mom Opinions of the individual as a “real person”
  23. 23. © 2012 MSLGROUP P23 TWO TYPES OF REAL Opinions of the masses as “real people”
  24. 24. © 2012 MSLGROUP P24 OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS Recognize what you are not • Brands are not people • At best, they are connected to people or the brainchild of people • Find your people Like a real person, don’t just invite people to your house • Get involved in communities – like recipe sites where brands are welcome Give up some power and invite consumers to discuss your products • Sharing what they like and don’t like
  25. 25. © 2012 MSLGROUP P25 An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX AN ARCHITECTURE OF INFLUENCE Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” The dominant source of food info Food discovery The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  26. 26. © 2012 MSLGROUP P26 THREE PROTOTYPES & THEIR ROLES Spectator 384 friends Dreamer 1,100 friends Doer 7,000 friends
  27. 27. © 2012 MSLGROUP P27 THE SPECTATOR The Spectator Social media is life as lived today • Consumes content • Socializes Julie is like most people Julie is a consumer of useful information, news, entertainment and good deals 384 friends PASSIVE ACTIVE
  28. 28. © 2012 MSLGROUP P28 The Dreamer Active social media user • Consumes people • Curates content Lisa is very social Lisa curates and pushes content to her social network that reflects her style & sensibilities THE DREAMER 1,100 friends PASSIVE ACTIVE
  29. 29. © 2012 MSLGROUP P29 The Doer Core in both food & social media • Creates content • Inspires followers THE DOER Natalie is a brand Natalie is well positioned to be the voice of other brands, if she really likes them 7,000 friends PASSIVE ACTIVE
  30. 30. © 2012 MSLGROUP P30 OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS CONSUMER BRAND INFLUENCER REVIEW Segment communications by type but address the whole ecosystem of “referral” To be social on social media, know the actors, follow the netiquette, and step into the flow of conversations
  31. 31. © 2012 MSLGROUP P31 Online media now the dominant source of food information An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX THE DOMINANT SOURCE OF FOOD INFO Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” An architecture of influence Food discovery The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  32. 32. © 2012 MSLGROUP P32 Spend more time engaged online about food Equally engaged with online and print about food Spend more time engaged with print about food 46% 31% 23% TIME READING AND LEARNING ABOUT FOOD
  33. 33. © 2012 MSLGROUP P33 MULTIPLE MEDIA REMAIN RELEVANT 31% 29% 28% 25% 25% 24% 17% 15% 13% 13% 12% 9% 7% Food Resources Used in Past Year Food shows I watch on TV Cookbooks Coupons printed in newspapers or magazine Recipe websites or phone apps Printed magazines or newspapers Coupons found online (not including deals from Groupon, Living Social) Restaurant review websites or phone apps Daily deals from Internet sites or apps like Groupon or Living Social Food or beverage manufacturer websites or apps Grocer websites or apps Food blogs or online food-oriented websites or feeds Staff, in-store demonstrations or printed materials from a grocery Instructional videos online
  34. 34. © 2012 MSLGROUP P34 FUTURE: Among Millennials, online recipe resources now more valuable than cookbooks or food shows on TV; print in stark decline
  35. 35. © 2012 MSLGROUP P35 Don’t bet on any one medium at this point Gear strategy to generation, especially when it comes to print Track emergent channels like in-store apps • Do consumers want to talk with you while in store? OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS
  36. 36. © 2012 MSLGROUP P36 Social media is a FOOD discovery medium An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX FOOD DISCOVERY Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  37. 37. © 2012 MSLGROUP P37 SOCIAL MEDIA DISCOVERS New restaurants to try Restaurants to avoid Meal planning (e.g., new recipes to make) New types of foods or beverages to try (such as ingredients, cuisines) New brands of foods or beverages to try Nutrition and ingredients Foods or beverages to avoid Alerts about food safety (e.g., product recall) 37% Food topics most interested in when using social networking sites 22% 21% 25% 26% 17% 14% 20%
  38. 38. © 2012 MSLGROUP P38 Join the consumer journey and share your discoveries Reveal a steady stream of welcome information Tie your brand to restaurant discoveries OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS Beware and prepare for product safety scares in social media
  39. 39. © 2012 MSLGROUP P39 Social media transforms the path to and from purchase Social media is a FOOD discovery medium An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX THE PATH TO AND FROM PURCHASE Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info Food discovery Influence and “real people” Deals and recipes
  40. 40. © 2012 MSLGROUP P40 A NEW PATH TO PURCHASE Forrester model Purchase Funnel gives way to Connected Circle
  41. 41. © 2012 MSLGROUP P41 “RESEARCH” BEFORE TRYING OR BUYING We use social media to mitigate risk • To get the best value and make the most informed decisions • We assess opinions from review websites, online forums, and personal networks • Decisions based on the number of stars, reviews and caliber of comments
  42. 42. © 2012 MSLGROUP P42 We add our experiences and opinions to the user-generated review process • Usually when we’re really upset or really impressed RANT OR RAVE AFTER WE’VE EATEN & SHOPPED “I love this juice!” “The worst!”
  43. 43. © 2012 MSLGROUP P43 EXAMPLE: LEIGH BUYS A GRILL • Pre-shop experience: • Broadly queried Facebook friends about grills • Read reviews on multiple retail websites • Joined 20,000+ followers of Weber on Twitter • Became a member of an online grill forum
  44. 44. © 2012 MSLGROUP P44 EXAMPLE: LEIGH BUYS A GRILL • Leigh chooses a Weber Summit Series grill
  45. 45. © 2012 MSLGROUP P45 EXAMPLE: LEIGH BUYS A GRILL • Post-shop experience: • Posted pictures of the grill on Facebook • Posted pictures of the grill’s first meal from her husband’s birthday party Leigh loves the new grill and her new salmon recipe and now her 500+ Facebook friends know about it too! Salmon from AllRecipes.com; it had 5 stars and over 100,000 people saved it. So, obviously it was really good! Leigh Scott
  46. 46. © 2012 MSLGROUP P46 Think about more closely integrating shopper marketing with social media functions • Consumers have closer ties to stores • Could better account for the full circle of purchase engagement Win points with the extraordinary • Dependable and predictable doesn’t win raves Manage negative issues within microseconds • Should big brands now manage issues with 24/7 situation rooms? OPPORTUNITIES
  47. 47. © 2012 MSLGROUP P47 Influence is accorded TO “Real People” Social media is a FOOD discovery medium An architecture of influence Has emergedINDEX INFLUENCE AND “REAL PEOPLE” Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info Food discovery The path to and from purchase Deals and recipes
  48. 48. © 2012 MSLGROUP P48 INFLUENCE STARTS WITH A PERSON Consumers prefer to hear from people who eat food, not entities who sell it Social Media makes consumers savvy • They don’t tolerate artificiality in voice or motive
  49. 49. © 2012 MSLGROUP P49 Consumers follow people on Twitter, become friends on Facebook and read blogs of people with: • Authentic voices • Sincere posts • Meaningful content
  50. 50. © 2012 MSLGROUP P50 36% INFLUENCE TRACKS TO INTIMACY F18a. Which of these would be likely to lead you to consider purchasing a new brand of food or beverage you haven't tried before in the following situations? n=1,641 Most influential on purchasing a new brand of food or beverage 30% 20% 17% 14% 13% 11% 7% 19% A close friend recommended it online A friend other than a close friend recommended it It got high ratings from lots of people like me including people I am on a social network with It got high ratings from lots of people like me online, but nobody I know A food writer or commentator recommended it A food manufacturer that makes things that I like recommended it A food retailer that sells things that I like recommended it No one I know recommended it, but trying it would give me a great story to share None of these
  51. 51. © 2012 MSLGROUP P51 WHAT IS REAL? Real is Relevant (quality) • Exceptional product that delivers on its promise consistent with company’s mission Has a Face (narrative) • Distinct personality or actual person(s) with a coherent message Has Friends (opinions) • Other real people, like you, talk for you and recommend you
  52. 52. © 2012 MSLGROUP P52 WHAT IS REAL? Real Shares (knowledge) • Offers information, humor, beauty, soulfulness and generosity Is Like-able (shared values) • Reflects shared values, interests, health concerns and aspirations Reveals Itself (transparency) • Stories of struggles, mishaps and revelations show character and demonstrate integrity
  53. 53. © 2012 MSLGROUP P53 Strictly Transactional (lowest price  substitutable) Personal Relationship (real people  loyalty) “Like” in order to receive coupons and deals “Like” & “Friend” to build real relationships with real people An effective social media strategy DEALS & THE REAL DEAL • Transactional relationships promote trial and re-trial • Personal relationships are more durable and valuable
  54. 54. © 2012 MSLGROUP P54 Benefits of coupons & deals • Consumers want to save money • Easy way for people to take notice • Opportunity for low-risk sampling • Stimulates trial and re-trial • Engenders appreciation and curiosity Drawbacks • Savings don’t necessarily equal loyalty • Deals hold more appeal than product • No guarantee people will pay full price later • Creates fickle and conditional consumers TRANSACTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
  55. 55. © 2012 MSLGROUP P55 PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS Benefits of building real relationships • Builds a personal and emotional relationship with your brand • Brand becomes a marker of identity and self- expression, which translates into real loyalty Drawbacks • Needs a Real Person or People to be the face of the brand • Can’t control the conversation
  56. 56. © 2012 MSLGROUP P56 OPPORTUNITIES Stay relevant by listening to what consumers want and giving it to them Use an engaging and consistent voice and tone Engender trust and credibility with reviews Enrich consumers lives and give them value beyond product and savings Aspire to be a likeable brand that’s a talisman of identity and aspiration – but don’t kid yourself Use personal stories to help establish intimacy and trust with consumers
  57. 57. © 2012 MSLGROUP P57 Consumers welcome two things from companies: Deals and recipes Influence is accorded TO “Real People” Social media is a FOOD discovery medium An architecture of influence Has emerged DEALS AND RECIPES Transforming food culture An antidote to isolation “Someone like me” An architecture of influence The dominant source of food info Food discovery The path to and from purchase Influence and “real people” INDEX
  58. 58. © 2012 MSLGROUP P58 52% ARE BRANDS WINNING FRIENDS ONLINE? • If a deal is really good, consumers will use social media to share it • Consumers want to maximum value with minimal marketing clutter • They will quickly sever relationships that fail to deliver Of Facebook users “like” a food or beverage company or brand to get discounts or coupons
  59. 59. © 2012 MSLGROUP P59 PEOPLE HAVE “FRIENDS” WHO Most consumers Individual Brands/Bloggers # FRIENDS 200-300 1000+ WHO ARE THE FRIENDS? • Friends & family • Acquaintances • Friends & family • Acquaintances • Loyal followers • Fans PURPOSE • Intimacy • Keeping current • Intimacy • Keeping current • Brand building • Relevance • Shared Values
  60. 60. © 2012 MSLGROUP P60 BUSINESSES HAVE “LIKES” What # Likes Who are the likes? Purpose & Meaning Big Brand Person Mark Bittman 36,016 • Home cooks • Food involved fans • Knowledge • Shared Values What # Likes Who are the likes? Purpose & Meaning Small/Local Brand Molly Moon 5,376 Blue Bottle Coffee 11,045 • Customers • Supporters • Updates on flavors/products • Shared Values • Personally identity What # Likes Who are the likes? Purpose & Meaning Retailer Starbucks 26,589,185 Whole Foods 767,000 Target 7,933,025 • Customers • Recipes and tips • Store events and savings • Consumers share experiences What # Likes Who are the likes? Purpose & Meaning CPG Brand Cheerios 589,422 Heinz Ketchup 890,000 Coca Cola 36,6000,000 • Consumers • Coupons and saving • Recipes
  61. 61. © 2012 MSLGROUP P61 OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRANDS Find ways to emulate small and local brands • Origin stories • Internal champions and experts with a face and a voice Satisfy and feed the giveaway beast but engage consumers while inducing them Occasionally offer extraordinary deals that are highly sharable Balance deals with recipes – the latter is a more intimate basis for a relationship Don’t act like an FSI in social circles!
  62. 62. © 2012 MSLGROUP P62 CONTACTS Steve Bryant Director, Food and Beverage MSLGROUP Americas Steve.Bryant@mslgroup.com 206.313.1588 Blaine Becker Senior Director, Marketing & Business Relations, the Hartman Group blaine@hartman-group.com 425.452.0818 ex. 124
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