How did the Civil War
get started?
Sectionalism
Merriam Webster: an exaggerated devotion to the
interests of a region
Meaning: Placing the needs of one’s own...
Popular Sovereignty
Merriam Webster: a pre-civil war doctrine
asserting the right of the people living in a newly
organize...
Dred Scott Case
Who was Dred Scott?
A slave, owned by Dr. John Emerson, who tried to
sue for his own freedom in 1847.
When...
Essential Question: What
was the significance of the
Dred Scott Case?
The Missouri Compromise of
1820
Missouri was picked up in the Western
Expansion.

They wanted to be a slave state, but tha...
Compromise of 1850
There was a controversy over slavery in the
territories gained in the Mexican – American war.

This com...
The 3/5ths Compromise
The amount of representatives in the House of
Representatives in Congress for each state is
determin...
Fugitive Slave Act
Slaves ran away to get to the free states and
become free people.

The plantation owners were furious t...
Kansas-Nebraska Act
This act mandated (created, defined) popular
sovereignty.

Made Kansas an undecided state until more
s...
Bleeding Kansas
In response to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, many
people began to move into Kansas. The people
were both pro-sl...
What is a Republican?
1860’s

Now

activist “big”
government

small “limited”
government

pro-income tax

anti- income tax...
Raid on Harper’s Ferry
October 16, 1859
John Brown
Led 18 men, both African American and white, to
raid an arsenal in Harp...
The Election of 1860:
Key Players - Democratic
Party by the northern
Stephen Douglass – Nominated
wing (anti slavery)

Joh...
The Election of 1860:
Key Players – Republican
Party
Abraham Lincoln –
Only nominee for the
party
Said that slavery
should...
The Election of 1860:
Outcome
Abraham Lincoln won!
Since the Democratic party was so divided, none
of their candidates rec...
The South Secedes
Secede: withdraw formally from membership in a
federal union, an alliance, or a political or
religious o...
The South Secedes
By February 1861, the following states had
joined SC:
Texas
Louisiana
Mississippi
Alabama
Florida
Georgi...
Lincoln’s Inaugural
Address:
March 4, 1861
“For instance, why may
not any portion of a
new confederacy a
year or two hence...
Fort Sumter
Location: Charleston, South Carolina (Union or
Confederacy?)
March 5, 1861 – General wrote to Lincoln in
need ...
Fort Sumter: What started
it?
Lincoln decided to send supplies unarmed,
leaving the choice to fire up to the South.

Confe...
Fort Sumter: The Battle
Union relief ships were out to sea and could not
read the fort due to extremely rough waters.

The...
Fort Sumter: Aftermath
When Lincoln heard of the attack, he sent 75,000
troops to fight for the Union. Many people
volunte...
Why didn’t NC join the
Confederacy at first?
NC was made up of a few huge plantation
owners and many independent farmers.
...
NC Governor John Ellis
(secession supporter)
was outraged when
Lincoln called for
volunteers for the Army.

Guilford Count...
North Carolina
secedes from the
Union on May 20,
1860.
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Civil war week 1

  1. 1. How did the Civil War get started?
  2. 2. Sectionalism Merriam Webster: an exaggerated devotion to the interests of a region Meaning: Placing the needs of one’s own region ahead of the needs of the nation. What does this mean for 19th century America? The North, South, and West all had different viewpoints on ways of life. The North was industrialized and had no need for slaves. The South was based on agriculture and used slaves in the fields. The West was making their own choices on whether or not slavery was necessary or even wanted.
  3. 3. Popular Sovereignty Merriam Webster: a pre-civil war doctrine asserting the right of the people living in a newly organized territory to decide by the vote of their territorial legislature whether or not slavery would be permitted there What does this mean for 19th century America? The states/territories formed during western expansion had the right to choose whether or not they wanted to allow slavery in their territory or not.
  4. 4. Dred Scott Case Who was Dred Scott? A slave, owned by Dr. John Emerson, who tried to sue for his own freedom in 1847. When Emerson died, Scott attempted to buy his freedom from Mrs. Emerson for $300. When he was rejected, he turned to the courts. What happened? The case went to the Supreme Court. In March of 1857, the court ruled that since Scott was black, he was not a citizen and therefore had no right to sue.
  5. 5. Essential Question: What was the significance of the Dred Scott Case?
  6. 6. The Missouri Compromise of 1820 Missouri was picked up in the Western Expansion. They wanted to be a slave state, but that created an unbalance between slave and free states. Popular sovereignty was not a known concept yet. The compromise settled the issue of unbalanced slave and free states.
  7. 7. Compromise of 1850 There was a controversy over slavery in the territories gained in the Mexican – American war. This compromise solved the controversy and completed some “housekeeping” items for the country.
  8. 8. The 3/5ths Compromise The amount of representatives in the House of Representatives in Congress for each state is determined by the population. The more people each state has, the more representation the state has in the House. The South wanted to include their slaves in the population, even though slaves weren’t considered citizens (as decided in the Dred Scott case) and could not vote. The North did not find this to be a fair representation. This compromise solved this controversy.
  9. 9. Fugitive Slave Act Slaves ran away to get to the free states and become free people. The plantation owners were furious that they could lose their slaves and never get them returned, even if the slaves had been found. This act resolved this issue.
  10. 10. Kansas-Nebraska Act This act mandated (created, defined) popular sovereignty. Made Kansas an undecided state until more settlers could vote on whether or not to become a slave state. This act led to Bleeding Kansas.
  11. 11. Bleeding Kansas In response to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, many people began to move into Kansas. The people were both pro-slavery and anti-slavery. The differences in viewpoints of the masses of people cause violence.
  12. 12. What is a Republican? 1860’s Now activist “big” government small “limited” government pro-income tax anti- income tax pro-economic intervention pro-states’ rights
  13. 13. Raid on Harper’s Ferry October 16, 1859 John Brown Led 18 men, both African American and white, to raid an arsenal in Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. Wanted to start a rebellion against slave holders The raid was paid for by abolitionists Brown was caught, convicted, and executed.
  14. 14. The Election of 1860: Key Players - Democratic Party by the northern Stephen Douglass – Nominated wing (anti slavery) John C. Breckinridge – Nominated by the southern wing (pro-slavery) John Bell – Nominated by the “Constitutional Union Party” made up of moderates from both the southern and northern wing (no position on slavery)
  15. 15. The Election of 1860: Key Players – Republican Party Abraham Lincoln – Only nominee for the party Said that slavery should remain undisturbed where it existed but would not be included in the new territories
  16. 16. The Election of 1860: Outcome Abraham Lincoln won! Since the Democratic party was so divided, none of their candidates received enough votes to win. He won in every northern state, but didn’t even show up on many southern state ballots. Lincoln won with only 40% of the vote.
  17. 17. The South Secedes Secede: withdraw formally from membership in a federal union, an alliance, or a political or religious organization Following the election, the South was concerned with Lincoln keeping his word about slavery. December 20, 1860 – South Carolina is the first state to secede from the union.
  18. 18. The South Secedes By February 1861, the following states had joined SC: Texas Louisiana Mississippi Alabama Florida Georgia They called themselves the Confederate States of America and elected Jefferson Davis as their President.
  19. 19. Lincoln’s Inaugural Address: March 4, 1861 “For instance, why may not any portion of a new confederacy a year or two hence arbitrarily secede again, precisely as portions of the present Union now claim to secede from it?... Plainly the central idea of secession is the essence of anarchy.”
  20. 20. Fort Sumter Location: Charleston, South Carolina (Union or Confederacy?) March 5, 1861 – General wrote to Lincoln in need of supplies. He also said that the Confederates were demanding their surrender. Would it be a good idea on Lincoln’s part to send supplies?
  21. 21. Fort Sumter: What started it? Lincoln decided to send supplies unarmed, leaving the choice to fire up to the South. Confederate President Jefferson Davis made the call to attack Fort Sumter before the Union arrived with supplies. April 12, 1861 – Confederate army opened fire on Fort Sumter.
  22. 22. Fort Sumter: The Battle Union relief ships were out to sea and could not read the fort due to extremely rough waters. The fort held out for 33 hours before surrendering on April 14, 1861.
  23. 23. Fort Sumter: Aftermath When Lincoln heard of the attack, he sent 75,000 troops to fight for the Union. Many people volunteered! Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas voted to join the Confederacy. THE CIVIL WAR HAS BEGUN!
  24. 24. Why didn’t NC join the Confederacy at first? NC was made up of a few huge plantation owners and many independent farmers. The plantation owners were on board with secession while the independent farmers were more willing to see what Lincoln had to offer. Stagville Plantation Durham, NC
  25. 25. NC Governor John Ellis (secession supporter) was outraged when Lincoln called for volunteers for the Army. Guilford County planner Jonathan Worth said, “The South is committing suicide.”
  26. 26. North Carolina secedes from the Union on May 20, 1860.
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