SOLAR THERMAL POWER!  GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007!     2. Solar Resource!      Manuel A. Silva Pérez                          ! ...
Contents       }    The sun as energy source       }    Sun‐Earth relationships       }    Solar radiation measurements...
El	  espectro	  electromagné0co	  The	  electromagne.c	  spectrum	  is	  a	  con.nuum	  of	  all	  electromagne.c	  waves	...
The	  electromagne0c	  spectrum	  Bands	  adopted	  by	  the	  Interna.onal	  Commission	  on	  Illumina.on	  (Commission	...
Black	  body	  A	  black	  body	  is	  an	  ideal	  object	  that	  absorbs	  100%	  of	  the	  radia.on	  that	  hits	  i...
Black	  body	  radia0on	    For	  a	  black	  body,	  as	  the	  temperature	  increases:	                                ...
Black	  body	  radia0on	  Stefan-­‐Boltzmann’s	  Law	   The	  total	  emissive	  power	  is	  the	  radia.on	  emifed	  by...
Irradiance; spectral irradianceThe	  irradiance	  (at	  a	  point	  of	  a	  surface)	  is	  the	  radiant	  power	  of	  ...
8	   GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
Solar Spectrum. Solar constant  Solar Constant                                Total Radiative flux (at all wavelengths)   ...
The Sun as a blackbody                             2500                                                   Visible	        ...
¡The Sun is a high quality energy source!                                 ⎛ Tamb ⎞                                        ...
Extraterrestrial solar radiation        On a normal surface               !            "r %                               ...
Average solar irradiance on the Earth                                                   GSC = 1367 W·m-2         Earth	  r...
14	   GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
Interac.on	  between	  solar	  radia.on	  and	  atmospheric	                          components	                         ...
Interac.on	  between	  solar	  radia.on	  and	  the	  Earth’s	  atmosphere	                                               ...
Scafering	  (change	  in	  direc.on	  per	  air	  molecules)                                                              ...
Absorp.on	  by	  ozone	                                                                            	                      ...
Lo	  =	  Ozone	  layer	  thickness	  (cm)	                                                      0.5                       ...
Absorp.on	  by	  gases	  (CO2,	  O2)                                                                                      ...
Absorp.on	  by	  water	  molecules                                                                                        ...
Absorp.on	  and	  diffusion	  by	  aerosols                                                                                ...
Solar	  radia.on	  on	  the	  Earth’s	  surface	             2000                        O3	                              ...
CHARACTERISTICS	  OF	  SOLAR	  RADIATION	              Cycles	     Solar	  energy	  reaches	  the	  earth	  in	  a	     di...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  CHARACTERISTICS	                   Low	  density	      }    The	  maximum	  possible	            amou...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  CHARACTERISTICS	                      Dependence	  on	  geography	  (la0tude)	      }    Under	  clea...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  CHARACTERISTICS	                   Random	  character	  }  Solar	  radia.on	  on	  the	  Earths	  sur...
SUN-­‐EARTH	  RELATIONSHIPS	                   Sun-­‐Earth	  distance	  }      The earth revolves around the Sun in an el...
SUN-­‐EARTH	  RELATIONSHIPS	                     Declina0on	  }     Eclip.c	  plane	  (ECLP):	  the	  plane	  of	  Earths...
SUN-­‐EARTH	  RELATIONSHIPS	  	    Rela0ve	  posi0on	  sun-­‐horizontal	  surface	      w     w     w                  ...
SUN-­‐EARTH	  RELATIONSHIPS	                   	  	  Rela.ve	  posi.on	  Sun	  -­‐	  inclined	  surface	      }    Consid...
EXTRATERRESTRIAL	  SOLAR	  RADIATION	                  	  	  Hourly	  radia.on	  over	  horizontal	  surface	      }    T...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  ON	  THE	  EARTH	  SURFACE	                   	  	  Direct	  solar	  radia.on	  (beam)	      }    Is	...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  ON	  THE	  EARTH	  SURFACE	                      	  	  Diffuse	  solar	  radia.on	      }    Part	  of...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  ON	  THE	  EARTH	  SURFACE	                   	  	  Reflected	  solar	  radia.on	      }    Radia.on	 ...
Solar	  radia0on	  measurement	                                                    	  36	        Meteorological	  Sta0on	 ...
Measurement	  of	  Solar	  Radia0on	  	  	  	  	  § 	  S	  ince	  1830,	  Herschel,	  Beloni	  and	  Pouillet	  developed...
Solar	  radia0on	  sensors                                   	  38	            GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
Solar radiation sensors}      Rotating shadowband        radiometer        }    Measures global + diffuse        }    C...
Measurement	  of	  Solar	  Radia.on	    § 	  Broad-­‐band	  global	  solar	  irradiance:	  Pyranometer	  	  	  	  	  § 	...
Global	  irradiance	   }  Most	  readily	  available	  data,	  required	  for	       many	  different	  applica.ons	   } ...
Global	  irradiance	  measurement	  –	  error	  sources	  	  }     Calibra.on	  errors	  }     Stability	  	  }     Non...
Diffuse	  irradiance	  measurement	  –	  error	  sources	  	       Same	  as	  global,	  plus	       }  Geometry	  of	  sh...
Direct	  normal	  (beam)	  irradiance	  measurement	                                                                      ...
Direct	  normal	  (beam)	  irradiance	  measurement	  –	   error	  sources	      }     Calibra.on	  errors	      }     C...
Measurement	  of	  Solar	  Radia.on	  The	  Baseline	  Surface	  Radia.on	  Network	  (BSRN)	  hfp://www.bsrn.awi.de/en/ho...
Measurement	  of	  Solar	  Radia.on	  –	  BSRN	  Sta.ons	  The	  SURFRAD	  network	  Sta.on	  at	  Boulder,	  CO.	  La0tud...
Contents        }    Quality control of solar radiation data        }    Solar radiation estimation              }    F...
Quality control of solar radiation data        }    Different procedures, all based on data filtering by:              }...
Quality	  control	  of	  solar	  radia.on	  data	  1.        Physically	  Possible	  Limits	  2.        Extremely	  Rare	 ...
FILTER	  1:	  Physically	  Possible	  Limits	           	                          Lower	  limit	                   Irradi...
FILTER	  2:	  Extremely	  Rare	  Limits	              Subscripts:	  go	  =	  Global	  horizontal,	  do	  =	  diffuse	  hori...
FILTER	  3:	  Comparison	  vs	  other	  measurements	                             Lower	  limit	  	                       ...
FILTER	  4:	  Comparison	  vs	  model	     	  Comparison	  vs	  a	  model.	  The	          model	  has	  to	  be	  adapted...
FILTER	  5:	  Visual	  Inspec.on	                                                                     1400                ...
Visual	  inspec.on	                            Estación: Cáceres (SAMCA)    18/11/2007                   1400             ...
Time	  offset	  Incorrect	  .me	  stamp	  	                                        900                                     ...
CLASSICAL	  ESTIMATION	  OF	  	  	  	  	  SOLAR	  RADIATION	  Models	  depend	  on	  the	  variable	  to	  es.mate	  and	 ...
Es.ma.on	  of	  daily	  or	  monthly	  global	  horizontal	  irradia.on	  from	  sunshine	  dura.on	  }      Angstrom	  –...
Es.ma.on	  of	  direct	  normal	  irradia.on	  from	  sunshine	  dura.on	                1000               900           ...
Decomposi0on	  models	  (es0ma0on	  of	  beam	  and	  diffuse	  components	                                from	  global	  ...
Kd	  –	  KT	  models	                                                           Modelos Kt-Kd diarios             1.2     ...
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  ESTIMATION	  FROM	  SATELLITE	  IMAGES	  63	                     GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
SOLAR	  RADIATION	  ESTIMATION	  FROM	  SATELLITE	  IMAGES	       }    Energy	  balance	                                 ...
THE	  SATELLITE	                         	  	  Meteorological	  satellites	   }     In	  meteorology	  studies	  frequent...
THE	  SATELLITE	                         	  	  Satellite	  classifica.on	   Related	  to	  the	  type	  of	  orbit	  :	   P...
METHODOLOGY	                          	  	  Advantages	          	  	          }         The	  geosta.onary	  satellites	...
METHODOLOGY	                          	  	  Disadvantages	          	  	          }         The	  range	  of	  the	  bril...
METHODOLOGY	                    	  	  Physical	  and	  sta.s.cal	  models	          }    	  The	  purpose	  of	  all	  mo...
METHODOLOGY	                        	  	  Physical	  and	  sta.s.cal	  models	          STATISTICAL	  MODELS	          } ...
METHODOLOGY	                  	  	  Physical	  and	  sta.s.cal	  models	          PHYSICAL	  MODELS	          }    Based	...
4.	  DATA	  BASES	  AND	  TOOLS	       EUROPE	       }  HELIOCLIM1	  and	  HELIOCLIM.	                        }    h+p:/...
The	  Na.onal	  Solar	  Radia.on	  Database	  }      Project	  Par.cipants	  -­‐	  Primary	  project	  funding	  came	  f...
The	  Na.onal	  Solar	  Radia.on	  Database	  }      Measured	  Data	  -­‐	  About	  40	  sta.ons	  in	  the	  updated	  ...
75	   GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
The	  Na.onal	  Solar	  Radia.on	  Database.	  TMY3	  }      The	  TMY3s	  are	  data	  sets	  of	  hourly	  values	  of	...
Statistical characterization of the solar resource}      The statistical characterization of solar radiation requires lon...
Solar resource assessmentfor CSP plants1.         Estimate the solar resource from readily available information          ...
Solar resource assessmentfor CSP plants5.          Perfom quality control of measured data6.          Compare estimates wi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Cu stp 02_solar_resource

634
-1

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
634
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cu stp 02_solar_resource

  1. 1. SOLAR THERMAL POWER! GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007! 2. Solar Resource! Manuel A. Silva Pérez ! silva@esi.us.es !
  2. 2. Contents }  The sun as energy source }  Sun‐Earth relationships }  Solar radiation measurements }  Quality control of solar radiation data }  Solar radiation estimation }  From meteorological data }  Models for the estimation of the beam component }  From Satellite images }  Databases and tools }  Typical Meteorological Years1 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  3. 3. El  espectro  electromagné0co  The  electromagne.c  spectrum  is  a  con.nuum  of  all  electromagne.c  waves  arranged  according  to  frequency  and  wavelength.    Energy  =  h·∙f      Planck’s  constant  h  =  6.62·∙10-­‐34  J·∙s   3·∙106  GHz   E N E R G Y   2 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  4. 4. The  electromagne0c  spectrum  Bands  adopted  by  the  Interna.onal  Commission  on  Illumina.on  (Commission  Interna.onal  de  lEclairage,  CIE)  UV,  visible  e  IR   3  !m   (3000  nm)   0.3  !m   (300  nm)   Shortwave  solar  radia.on   Longwave  solar  radia.on   UV  C   UV  B   UV  A   Visible   IR  A   IR  B   IR  C   100   280   315   400   760   1400   3000   106   λ  (nm)   3·∙106   7.5·∙105   105   300   3  f  (GHz)   GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  5. 5. Black  body  A  black  body  is  an  ideal  object  that  absorbs  100%  of  the  radia.on  that  hits  it.  It  also  emits  the  maximum  radia.on  at  all  wavelengths  and  all  direc.ons  at  a  given  temperature.  The  spectral  (  or  monochroma.c)  p  )  emissive  power  of  a  black  body.    ebλ  is  the  energy  emited  per  .me  and  area  units  at  each  wavelength,  and  it  is  a  func.on  of  temperature   C1 Planck’s  equa.on   ebλ = 5 λ ⋅e [ C2 / λT ] −1 (W·∙m-­‐2  ·∙μm-­‐1)   λ → µm T→K C1 = 3.7427 ⋅108 W ⋅ m-2µm4 C2 = 1.4388 ⋅104 µm ⋅ K4 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  6. 6. Black  body  radia0on   For  a  black  body,  as  the  temperature  increases:   ebλ 8 -­‐ The  emissive  power   10 increases  for  every   7 10 wavelength   Potencia emisiva espectral (Wm µm ) -1 6 10 -2 -­‐  The  rela.ve  amount  of   5 10 energy  emifed  at  short   4 10 wavelengths  increases   3 10 5777 K 2500 K 2 1000 K -­‐  The  posi.on  of  the   10 maximum  emissive   1 10 300 K power  is  displaced  to   0 10 shorter  wavelengths   0 5 10 λ (µm) 15 205 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  7. 7. Black  body  radia0on  Stefan-­‐Boltzmann’s  Law   The  total  emissive  power  is  the  radia.on  emifed  by  the  black  body   at  all  wavelengths,  and  is  given  by:   λ =∞ C1 eb = λ =∞ ∫λ =0 ebλ dλ = ∫ dλ eb = σT 4 (W·∙m-­‐2)   λ =0 λ 5 [ ] ⋅ eC2 / λT − 1 Stefan-­‐Boltzman’s  constant     σ  =  5.6866·∙10-­‐8  W·∙m-­‐2K-­‐4   Wien’s  Law   The  wavelengths  corresponding  to  the   2897.8 maximum  emifed  power  is  inversely   λmax = (μm)   T propor.onal  to  temperature  6 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  8. 8. Irradiance; spectral irradianceThe  irradiance  (at  a  point  of  a  surface)  is  the  radiant  power  of  all  wavelengths  incident  from  all  upward  direc.ons  on  a  small  element  of  surface  containing  the  point  under  considera.on  divided  by  the  area  of  the  element.  SI  unit  is  W·∙m-­‐2.    The  spectral  irradiance  is  the  irradiance  at  a  given  wavelength  per  unit  wavelength  interval.  The  SI  unit  is  W  m–3,  but  a  commonly  used  unit  is  W  m–2  μm–1.   ⋅ ⎛ remit ⎞ 2 I 0nλ = ebλ ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ r ⎠ remit   7 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  9. 9. 8 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  10. 10. Solar Spectrum. Solar constant Solar Constant Total Radiative flux (at all wavelengths) ⋅ 2500 inciding on a surface perpendicular to I 0 nλ the sun rays at a distance of 1 AU(W·∙m-­‐2  ·∙!m-­‐1)   2000 GSC (W·∙m-­‐2)   1500 NASA 1353 WRC 1367 1000 GSC =  4921  kJ·∙m-­‐2·∙h-­‐1   500 GSC =  0.082  MJ·∙m-­‐2·∙min-­‐1   0 λ  (μm)   0,0 0,5 1,0 1,5 2,0 2,5 3,0 hfp://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/spectra/am0/  9 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  11. 11. The Sun as a blackbody 2500 Visible   2000 http://mesola.obspm.fr/solar_spect.php UV   IR   ⋅ I 0 nλ 1500 Extraterrestrial solar spectrum(W·∙m-­‐2  ·∙μm-­‐1)   1000 Black  body  @  5777  K   Size  of  the  Sun  @  1  AU   500 0 λ  (μm)   0,0 0,5 1,0 1,5 2,0 2,5 3,0 hfp://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/standards/am0/wehrli1985.new.html   10 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  12. 12. ¡The Sun is a high quality energy source! ⎛ Tamb ⎞ ⎟ = QSun ⎛1 − 300K ⎞ ⎜1 − W = QSun ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ TSun ⎠ ⎝ 5777 K ⎠}  Aprox. 95% of the extraterrrestrial solar radiation can be converted to work 11 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  13. 13. Extraterrestrial solar radiation On a normal surface ! "r % 2 I 0n = GSC $ 0 = GSC E0 # r& On a horizontal surface ! ! I 0 = I 0n cos! z ! "r % 2 I 0 = GSC $ 0 cos! z = GSC E0 cos! z # r&12 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  14. 14. Average solar irradiance on the Earth GSC = 1367 W·m-2 Earth  radius  =  6740  km.  The   The  energy  received  on  1  day  is   intercepted  solar  radia.on  is   distributed  on  an  area  4πR2   propor.onal  to  πR2   The  average  solar  irradiance  on  the  top  of  the  atmosphere  is   342  W·∙m-­‐2  13   GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  15. 15. 14 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  16. 16. Interac.on  between  solar  radia.on  and  atmospheric   components   Rayleigh Mie diffusion   diffusion Beam Diffuse irradiance   irradiance   Beam irradiance   Albedo irradiance 15 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  17. 17. Interac.on  between  solar  radia.on  and  the  Earth’s  atmosphere   (Clear  Day)   100%   1   Reflec0on  to   Absorp0on   space  %   %   Air  molecules   0.1  a  10   8   5   Dust,  aerosols   1  to  5   Diffuse   %   0.5  to  10   Moisture   2  to  10   Beam   11%  to  23%   83%  to  56%   5%  a  15%   16 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  18. 18. Scafering  (change  in  direc.on  per  air  molecules)   1 0.9 Coef. transmisión escaterin 0.8 0.7 Atmosphere   0.6 θz   0.5 θz=20º 0.4 z = 0 m. 0.3 Earth   0.2 0.1 0 0.3 1.3 2.3 3.3 Longitud onda (micras) 17 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  19. 19. Absorp.on  by  ozone     1 0.9 0.8Coef. transmisión ozono 0.7 0.6 Atmosphere   θz   0.5 0.4 0.3 Earth   0.2 θz=20º 0.1 Lo=0.2 0 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 Longitud de onda (micras) 18 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  20. 20. Lo  =  Ozone  layer  thickness  (cm)   0.5 Enero Espesor capa ozono (cm) Febrero 0.45 Marzo 0.4 Abril Mayo 0.35 Junio 0.3 Julio Agosto 0.25 Septiembre 0.2 Octubre -90 -70 -50 -30 -10 10 30 50 70 90 Noviembre Norte   Latitud (º) Sur   Diciembre19 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  21. 21. Absorp.on  by  gases  (CO2,  O2)     1 Coef. transmisión por mezcla de gases 0.9 0.8 Atmosphere   0.7 θz   0.6 0.5 0.4 Earth   0.3 θz=20º   0.2 z  =  0  m.   0.1 0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 Longitud de onda (micras)20 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  22. 22. Absorp.on  by  water  molecules   1Coef. transmisión por absorción del 0.9 0.8 θz=20º   0.7 Atmosphere   T=25ºC   vapor de agua 0.6 θz   0.5 RH=50%   0.4 0.3 Earth   0.2 0.1 0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 Longitud de onda (micras) 21 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  23. 23. Absorp.on  and  diffusion  by  aerosols   1Coeficiente transmisión aerosoles 0.9 0.8 Atmosphere   0.7 θz   0.6 τa(total  afenua.on)   θz=20º   0.5 α=1.3   τas(difussion)   β=0.15   Earth   0.4 τaa(absorp.on)   0.3 0.2 0.1 0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 Longitud de onda (micras)22 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  24. 24. Solar  radia.on  on  the  Earth’s  surface   2000 O3   nd  =  94   Extraterrestre 5777 K θz=20º   1500 O2   z  =  0  m.   In Idh α=1.3   β=0.15  W/m 2·µm IT Ts=25ºC   1000 RH=50%   H2O   Lo  =  0.3   CO2   500 H2O   0 0,3 1,3 2,3 3,3 Longitud de onda (micras) 23 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  25. 25. CHARACTERISTICS  OF  SOLAR  RADIATION   Cycles   Solar  energy  reaches  the  earth  in  a   discon.nuous  form,  resul.ng  in   different  cycles: }  Daily  cycle:     }  accounts  for  50%  of  the  total   availability  of  daily  hours.   }  Another  effect  of  the  daily  cycle  is  the   modula.on  of  the  received  energy   throughout  the  day. }  Seasonal  cycle:     }  modula.on  of  the  received  energy   throughout  the  year.  24 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  26. 26. SOLAR  RADIATION  CHARACTERISTICS   Low  density   }  The  maximum  possible   amount  of  solar  radia.on   received  by  the  surface  of  the   atmosphere  at  1  AU  is  1367   W/m2     }  Large  surfaces  are  needed  to   achieve  high  power  outputs.   }  To  increase  the  density   concentra.on  should  be   used.   }  Only  the  direct  component  of   solar  radia.on  can  be   concentrated.  25 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  27. 27. SOLAR  RADIATION  CHARACTERISTICS   Dependence  on  geography  (la0tude)   }  Under  clear  sky  condi.ons:  the  solar   radia.on  depends  mainly  on  the  la.tude.   }  La.tude  effect  is  equivalent  to  the   modifica.on  of  the  angle  of  incidence  of   solar  radia.on.   }  For  the  modula.on  of  the  received   energy  the  following  can  be  used:   }  Solar  tracker   }  Tilted  Plane     }  The  inclina.on  of  the  recep.on  plane   means:   }   Modifica.on  of  the  la.tude  effect     }  Modifica.on  of  the  annual  distribu.on.  26 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  28. 28. SOLAR  RADIATION  CHARACTERISTICS   Random  character  }  Solar  radia.on  on  the  Earths  surface  is  modulated  by  clima.c   condi.ons.  }  Clear  sky  condi.ons  are  not  common.  }  The  la.tude  indicates  a  maximum  range,  but  the  energy   received  is  determined  by  local  clima.c  condi.ons.   27 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  29. 29. SUN-­‐EARTH  RELATIONSHIPS   Sun-­‐Earth  distance  }  The earth revolves around the Sun in an elliptical orbit, with the Sun in one of its foci.}  The amount of solar radiation incoming to the Earth is inversely proportional to the square of the Sun – Earth distance.}  The distance is measured in astronomical units (AU) equivalent to the mean Sun ‐ Earth distance.   28 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  30. 30. SUN-­‐EARTH  RELATIONSHIPS   Declina0on  }  Eclip.c  plane  (ECLP):  the  plane  of  Earths  revolu.on  around  the  Sun}  Equatorial  plane  (EQUP):  the  plane  containing  the  equator  }  The  Polar  axis  is  .lted  23.5o  with  respect  to  the  normal  to  the  ECLP.   w  ECLP  and  EQUP  cross  in  the   equinoxes  and  the  distance  is   maximum  in  the  sols.ces.   w  The  angle  in  a  specific  moment   between  both  planes  is  called   DECLINATION   29 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  31. 31. SUN-­‐EARTH  RELATIONSHIPS     Rela0ve  posi0on  sun-­‐horizontal  surface   w  w  w  ‐ ␣ w 30 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  32. 32. SUN-­‐EARTH  RELATIONSHIPS      Rela.ve  posi.on  Sun  -­‐  inclined  surface   }  Considering  a  south   orienta.on,  the  diagram   shows  how  a  surface   inclined  β  in  a  la.tude  φ   is  similar  to  a  horizontal   surface  in  a  la.tude  φ-­‐β.  31 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  33. 33. EXTRATERRESTRIAL  SOLAR  RADIATION      Hourly  radia.on  over  horizontal  surface   }  The  extraterrestrial  radia.on  on  a   normal  surface  (perpendicular  to  the   Sun´s  rays)  is  expressed  as:   I 0 n = I sc (ro r ) = I sc E0 2 w  For  an  horizontal  surface   I 0 = I sc E0 cosθ z32 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  34. 34. SOLAR  RADIATION  ON  THE  EARTH  SURFACE      Direct  solar  radia.on  (beam)   }  Is  the  radia.on  coming  directly  from  the  Sun  disk.   }  It  has  a  direc.onal  character  and  can  be  concentrated.   }  Accounts  for  approx.  90%  of  the  solar  radia.on  on  clear   sky  days,  and  can  be  null  in  cloud  covered  days.   }  As  a  direc.onal  component,  the  contribu.on  on  a  surface   is  the  perpendicular  projec.on  over  this  surface:  beam   radia.on  is  the  radia.on  on  a  plane  perpendicular  to  the   sun´s  rays.   I  =  B  cos  θ  It  can  be  maximized  with  solar  trackers.    33 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  35. 35. SOLAR  RADIATION  ON  THE  EARTH  SURFACE      Diffuse  solar  radia.on   }  Part  of  the  solar  radia.on  is  absorbed  by  the  atmospheric   components.  Another  part  is  reflected  by  these   components  producing  direc.on  changes  and  energy   reduc.on.   }  Diffuse  radia.on  =  the  part  of  this  radia.on  that  reaches   the  earth´s  surface.   }  Diffuse  radia.on  has  three  components:   }  Circumsolar   }  Horizon  band   }  Blue  sky  34 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  36. 36. SOLAR  RADIATION  ON  THE  EARTH  SURFACE      Reflected  solar  radia.on   }  Radia.on  coming  from  the  reflec.on  of  the  solar  radia.on   on  the  ground  or  on  other  nearby  surfaces.   }  Usually  is  small,  but  in  occasionally  can  account  for  up  to   40%  of  the  solar  radia.on  on  a  given  surface.  35 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  37. 37. Solar  radia0on  measurement    36 Meteorological  Sta0on  at  GEENS4830 – ECEN 5007 the   eville  Engineering  School  (since  1984)    
  38. 38. Measurement  of  Solar  Radia0on          §   S  ince  1830,  Herschel,  Beloni  and  Pouillet  developed  instruments,  capable  of                  m  easuring  the  intensity  of  solar  radia.on                 §     P  recise  determina.on  of  the  solar  constant  in  the  early  1900’s,  during  the  energy  crisis                          a  nd  solar  energy  development  in  1970s.         §   N  eed    to  befer  understand  global  climate  change  in  the  1980s  and  1990s.                             37 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  39. 39. Solar  radia0on  sensors  38 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  40. 40. Solar radiation sensors}  Rotating shadowband radiometer }  Measures global + diffuse }  Calculates direct from global + difusse measurements 39 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  41. 41. Measurement  of  Solar  Radia.on   §   Broad-­‐band  global  solar  irradiance:  Pyranometer          §     M          easures  energy  incident  on  a  flat  surface,  usually  horizontal               §   Response  decreases  approximately  as  the  cosine  of  the  angle  of  incidence.     §   D  iffuse  radia.on  is  measured  with  a  pyranometer  and  a  shading  device  (disc,  shadow  ring,           or  band)    that  excludes  direct  solar  radia.on   40 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  42. 42. Global  irradiance   }  Most  readily  available  data,  required  for   many  different  applica.ons   }  Difficult  to  model   }  Sensi.ve  to  the  albedo  of  the  surroundings    Measurement   }  No  absolute  reference  for  calibra.on     }  Cosine  effect  (correc.on  required)   }  Many  instruments  available    41 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  43. 43. Global  irradiance  measurement  –  error  sources    }  Calibra.on  errors  }  Stability    }  Non-­‐Linearity  }  Shadows  and  reflec.ons  from  the  surroundings  }  Cosine  effect  }  Spectral  transmissivity  of  the  dome  }  Thermal  offset  of  the  dome  }  Temperature  dependence  }  Cleanliness  of  the  dome  }  Leveling   42 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  44. 44. Diffuse  irradiance  measurement  –  error  sources     Same  as  global,  plus   }  Geometry  of  shading  device   }  Incorrect  alignment  of  shading  device   43 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  45. 45. Direct  normal  (beam)  irradiance  measurement   5.7  º  }  Easy  to  model  }  Sensi.ve  to  afenua.on    }  It  is  the  main  component  under  clear   sky  Measurement  }  Precise  calibra.on  (absolute  –cavity-­‐   radiometer)  }  Requires  con.nuous  tracking     Eppley  Labs  pyrheliometer  (NIP)    tracker   44 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  46. 46. Direct  normal  (beam)  irradiance  measurement  –   error  sources   }  Calibra.on  errors   }  Calibra.on  stability   }  Linearity   }  Spectral  transmissivity  of  the  window   }  Incorrect  alignment,  obstacles   }  Temperature  dependence   }  Window  cleanliness      45 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  47. 47. Measurement  of  Solar  Radia.on  The  Baseline  Surface  Radia.on  Network  (BSRN)  hfp://www.bsrn.awi.de/en/home/bsrn/     § The  BSRN  was  recently  (early  2004)  designated  as  the  global   baseline  network  for  surface  radia.on  for  the  Global  Climate   Observing  System  (GCOS).  The  BSRN  sta.ons  also  contribute  to   the  Global  Atmospheric  Watch  (GAW).   § Proposed  by  the  World  Climate  Research  Program  (late  1980s)   § Objec.ve:  high  accuracy  surface  irradiance  measurement  all  over   the  world   § Valida.on  of  satellite  es.ma.on  models   § Valida.on  of  radia.on  codes  for  climate  models   46 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  48. 48. Measurement  of  Solar  Radia.on  –  BSRN  Sta.ons  The  SURFRAD  network  Sta.on  at  Boulder,  CO.  La0tude:  40.13  degrees  North    Longitude:  105.24  degrees  West    Eleva0on:  1689  meters    Time  Zone:  Local  Time  +  7  hours  =  UTC    Installed:  July  1995       The  Boulder  SURFRAD  instruments  are   located  on  the  deck  at  SRRBs  Table  Mountain   Test  Facility,  located  8  miles  north  of  Boulder.   These  instruments  are  part  of  a  larger  set   maintained  at  this  loca.on  and  used  for   annual  intercomparisons  and  other  research.     47 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  49. 49. Contents }  Quality control of solar radiation data }  Solar radiation estimation }  From meteorological data }  Models for the estimation of the beam component }  From Satellite images }  Databases and tools }  Typical Meteorological Years48 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  50. 50. Quality control of solar radiation data }  Different procedures, all based on data filtering by: }  Comparison with physical constraints, other measurements, models. }  Visual inspection by experienced staff }  An example follows (see also http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/pubs/qc_tnd/ for a different, more exhaustive procedure)49 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  51. 51. Quality  control  of  solar  radia.on  data  1.  Physically  Possible  Limits  2.  Extremely  Rare  Limits  3.  Comparisons  vs  other  measurements  4.  Comparisons  vs  model  5.  Visual  inspec.on   50 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  52. 52. FILTER  1:  Physically  Possible  Limits     Lower  limit   Irradiance   Upper  limit   0   Igo   Io   0   Ido   Itop+10   0   ID   Io   Subscripts:  go  =  Global  horizontal,  do  =  diffuse  horzontal,  D  =  beam   Io  =  extraterrestrial  irradiance;  Itop  =  irradiance  at  minimum  zenith  angle   Units:  W  m-­‐2   51 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  53. 53. FILTER  2:  Extremely  Rare  Limits   Subscripts:  go  =  Global  horizontal,  do  =  diffuse  horizontal,  D  =  beam   Z:  zenith  angle;  m  =  air  mass;  Eo  =  Sun  –  Earth  distance  correc.on  factor   Io  =  extraterrestrial  irradiance;  Itop  =  irradiance  at  minimum  zenith  angle   Units:  W  m-­‐2   52 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  54. 54. FILTER  3:  Comparison  vs  other  measurements   Lower  limit     Irradiance     Upper  limit   (Igo-­‐Ido)-­‐50  Wm-­‐2   ID·∙cosZ   (Igo-­‐Ido)+50  Wm-­‐2   ID·∙cosZ-­‐50  Wm-­‐2   Igo-­‐Ido   ID·∙cosZ+50  Wm-­‐2     |Igo-­‐Ido  –  ID  cos  z|±  50  Wm-­‐2   Subscripts:  go  =  Global  horizontal,  do  =  diffuse  horizontal,  D  =  beam     Z:  zenith  angle;  m  =  air  mass;  Eo  =  Sun  –  Earth  distance  correc.on  factor   Io  =  extraterrestrial  irradiance;  Itop  =  irradiance  at  minimum  zenith  angle   Units:  W  m-­‐2   53 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  55. 55. FILTER  4:  Comparison  vs  model    Comparison  vs  a  model.  The   model  has  to  be  adapted  to   the  clima.c  characterisi.cs   of  the  Sta.on.            Example:  Hourly  beam-­‐to-­‐ extraterrestrial  irradiance   plofed  against  clearness   index  (NREL’s  quality  control   procedure)     54 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  56. 56. FILTER  5:  Visual  Inspec.on   1400 1200 1000 irradiancias W/m2 800 IDmedida ig 600 id 400 200 0 -­‐ 8 -­‐ 6 -­‐ 4 -­‐ 2 0 2 4 6 8 hora solar 55 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  57. 57. Visual  inspec.on   Estación: Cáceres (SAMCA) 18/11/2007 1400 1200 1000 800 I(W/m2) 600 400 200 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 GMT(h) 56 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  58. 58. Time  offset  Incorrect  .me  stamp     900 900 Ig Ig 800 800 horas sol horas sol 700 700 Igcorregida 600 600 500 500 400 400 300 300 200 200 100 100 t2 t1 tocaso t1 t2 torto 0 t1 0 t2 -8 -6 dm -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 torto tocaso dt -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 57 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  59. 59. CLASSICAL  ESTIMATION  OF          SOLAR  RADIATION  Models  depend  on  the  variable  to  es.mate  and  on  the  available   data  and  their  characteris.cs:  }  Es.ma.on  of  daily  or  monthly  global  horizontal  or  direct   normal  irradia.on  from  sunshine  dura.on  }  Es.ma.on  of  hourly  values  from  daily  values  of  global   horizontal  irradia.on    }  Es.ma.on  of  global  irradia.on  on  .lted  surfaces  }  Es.ma.on  of  the  beam  component  from  global  horizontal   irradia.on    }  Etc.   58 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  60. 60. Es.ma.on  of  daily  or  monthly  global  horizontal  irradia.on  from  sunshine  dura.on  }  Angstrom  –  type  formulas   H/H0  =  a  +  b  (s/s0)  }  Where     }  H  is  the  monthly  average  of  the  daily  global  irradia.on  on  a   horizontal  surface   }  H0  is  the  monthly  average  of  the  daily  extraterrestrial  irradia.on  on   a  horizontal  surface   }  s  is  the  monthly  average  of  the  daily  number  of  hours  of  bright   sunshine,     }  s0  is  the  monthly  average  of  the  daily  maximum  number  of  hours  of   possible  sunshine     }  a  and  b  are  regression  constants   59 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  61. 61. Es.ma.on  of  direct  normal  irradia.on  from  sunshine  dura.on   1000 900 800 700Ebn / W·m-2 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 hora solar / h 60 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  62. 62. Decomposi0on  models  (es0ma0on  of  beam  and  diffuse  components   from  global  horizontal)  61 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  63. 63. Kd  –  KT  models   Modelos Kt-Kd diarios 1.2 1 0.8 Kd 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 Kt Collares Muneer Liu-Jordan GTER00-05 Ruth and Chant GTERD00-0562 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  64. 64. SOLAR  RADIATION  ESTIMATION  FROM  SATELLITE  IMAGES  63 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  65. 65. SOLAR  RADIATION  ESTIMATION  FROM  SATELLITE  IMAGES   }  Energy  balance   I 0 e = I s + Ea + Et Modeled 1 Ig = (I 0e − I s − Ea ) 1− A Modeled Measured - Measured Estimated 64 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  66. 66. THE  SATELLITE      Meteorological  satellites   }  In  meteorology  studies  frequent    and   high  density  observa.ons  on  the   Earths  surface  are  required.    Conven.onal  systems  do  not  provide   a  global  cover.   w  An  important  tool  to  analyse  the  distribu.on  of  the  clima.c  system  are  the   METEOROLOGICAL  SATELLITES.  These  can  be:   ð  Polar  satellites   ð  Geosta.onary:  In  Europe,  the  system  of  geosta.onary  meteorological  satellites  is  called   METEOSAT      65 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  67. 67. THE  SATELLITE      Satellite  classifica.on   Related  to  the  type  of  orbit  :   Polar  satellites:  placed  in  polar  orbits,   modifying  its  perspec.ve  and  distance   to  the  Earth.      Resolu.on  1m  to  1km.   Geosta.onary  satellites:  placed  in  the  geosta.onary  orbit  that  is,   the  place  in  the  space  where  the  Earths  afrac.on  force  is   null.  It  is  an  unique  circumference    where  all  the   geosta.onary  satellites  are  situated  in  order  to  cover  the   whole  Earths  surface.  The  resolu.on  of  these  satellites  are   maximum  at  the  equator,  and  decrease  in  all  direc.ons.  66 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  68. 68. METHODOLOGY      Advantages       }  The  geosta.onary  satellites  show  simultaneously  wide  areas.     }  The  informa.on  of  these  satellites  is  always  referred  to  the   same  .me  window.   }  It  is  possible  to  analyse  past  climate  using  satellite  images  of   previous  years.   }  The  u.lisa.on  of  the  same  detector  to  evaluate  the  radia.on  in   different  places.  67 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  69. 69. METHODOLOGY      Disadvantages       }  The  range  of  the  brilliance  values  of  cloud  cover  (90-­‐255)  and  of   the  soils  (30-­‐100)  overlap.     }  The  digital  conversion  results  in  imprecision  for  low  values  of   brilliance.     }  The  image  informa.on  is  related  to  an  instant,  while  the   radia.on  data  is  es.mated  in  a  hourly  or  daily  period.     }  The  spectral  response  of  the  detector  is  not  in  the  same  range   of  that  of    conven.onal  pyranometers.  68 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  70. 70. METHODOLOGY      Physical  and  sta.s.cal  models   }   The  purpose  of  all  models  is  the  es.ma.on  of  the   solar  global  irradia.on  on  every    pixel  of  the  image.   }  The  exis.ng  models  are  classified  in:  physical  and   sta/s/cal  depending  of  the  nature  of  the  approach  to   evaluate  the  interac.on  between  the  solar  radia.on   and  the  atmosphere.   }  Both  types  of  models  show  similar  error  ranges.  69 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  71. 71. METHODOLOGY      Physical  and  sta.s.cal  models   STATISTICAL  MODELS   }  Based  on  rela.onships  (usually  sta.s.cal  regressions)  between  pyranometric   data  and  the  digital  count  of  the  satellite.   }  This  rela.on  is  used  to  calculate  the  global  radia.on  from  the  digital  count  of   the  satellite.     }  Simple  and  easy  to  apply.     }  They  do  not  need  meteorological  measurements.   }  The  main  limita.ons  are:   }  The  needed  of  surface  data.     }  The  lack  of  universality.  70 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  72. 72. METHODOLOGY      Physical  and  sta.s.cal  models   PHYSICAL  MODELS   }  Based  on  the  physics  of  the  atmosphere.  They  consider:   }  The  absorp.on  and  scafer  coefficients  of  the  atmospheric   components.   }  The  albedo  of  the  clouds  and  their  absorp.on  coefficients.   }  The  ground  albedo.   }  Physical  models  do  not  need  ground  data  and  are  universal   models.   }  Need  atmospheric  measurements.  71 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  73. 73. 4.  DATA  BASES  AND  TOOLS   EUROPE   }  HELIOCLIM1  and  HELIOCLIM.   }  h+p://www.helioclim.net/index.html   }  h+p://www.soda-­‐is.com/eng/index.html   }  ESRA  (European  Solar  Radia0on  Atlas).   }  h+p://www.helioclim.net/esra/   }  PVGIS  (Photovoltaic  Gis)   }  h+p://re.jrc.cec.eu.int/pvgis/pv/     }  SOLEMI  (Solar  Energy  Mining)   }  h+p://www.solemi.de/home.html   USA    Na0onal  Solar  Radia0on  Database   }  h+p://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/nsrdb/1991-­‐2005/tmy3   NASA   }  h+p://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/         WORLD   }  METEONORM.   }  h+p://www.meteotest.ch/en/mn_home?w=ber     }  WRDC  (World  Radia0on  Data  Centre)   }  h+p://wrdc-­‐mgo.nrel.gov/     72 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  74. 74. The  Na.onal  Solar  Radia.on  Database  }  Project  Par.cipants  -­‐  Primary  project  funding  came  from  NREL   with  support  from  the  following  collaborators:     }  The  Atmospheric  Sciences  Research  Center,  State  University  of  New   York  at  Albany     }  Climate  Systems  Branch,  Na.onal  Aeronau.cs  and  Space   Administra.on     }  Na.onal  Clima.c  Data  Center,  U.S.  Department  of  Commerce     }  Northeast  Regional  Climate  Center,  Cornell  University     }  Solar  Consul.ng  Services,  Colebrook,  New  Hampshire     }  Solar  Radia.on  Monitoring  Laboratory,  University  of  Oregon.     73 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  75. 75. The  Na.onal  Solar  Radia.on  Database  }  Measured  Data  -­‐  About  40  sta.ons  in  the  updated  NSRDB   include  measured  solar  data,  supplied  by  these  agencies:     }  Atmospheric  Radia.on  Measurement  (ARM)  Program,  DOE     }  Florida  Solar  Energy  Center,  State  of  Florida     }  Integrated  Surface  Irradiance  Study  (ISIS)  and  Surface  Radia.on   Budget  Measurement  (SURFRAD)  Networks,  NOAA/ARL,  NOAA/ ESRL/Global  Monitoring  Division     }  Measurement  and  Instrumenta.on  Data  Center,  NREL     }  University  of  Oregon  Solar  Radia.on  Monitoring  Laboratory  Network     }  University  of  Texas  Solar  Energy  Laboratory.     74 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  76. 76. 75 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  77. 77. The  Na.onal  Solar  Radia.on  Database.  TMY3  }  The  TMY3s  are  data  sets  of  hourly  values  of  solar  radia.on  and   meteorological  elements  for  a  1-­‐year  period.  Their  intended   use  is  for  computer  simula.ons  of  solar  energy  conversion   systems  and  building  systems  to  facilitate  performance   comparisons  of  different  system  types,  configura.ons,  and   loca.ons  in  the  United  States  and  its  territories.  Because  they   represent  typical  rather  than  extreme  condi.ons,  they  are  not   suited  for  designing  systems  to  meet  the  worst-­‐case  condi.ons   occurring  at  a  loca.on.    }  hfp://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/nsrdb/1991-­‐2005/tmy3.     76 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  78. 78. Statistical characterization of the solar resource}  The statistical characterization of solar radiation requires long series of MEASURED data }  Sunshine hours – good availability }  Global horizontal (GH) – good availability }  Direct Normal (DNI) – poor availability}  The statistical distribution of solar radiation depends on the aggregation periods }  Monthly and yearly values of global irradiation have normal distribution }  The distribution of yearly values of DNI is not normal (Weibul?) 77 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  79. 79. Solar resource assessmentfor CSP plants1.  Estimate the solar resource from readily available information 1  Surface measurements 1  On site 2  Nearby 2  Satellite estimates 3  Sunshine hours 4  Qualitative information2.  Set up a measurement station 1.  Datalogger 2.  Pyrheliometer 3.  Pyranometer (global and diffuse) 4.  Meteo (wind, temperature, RH)3.  Maintain the station (frequent cleaning!) 78 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  80. 80. Solar resource assessmentfor CSP plants5.  Perfom quality control of measured data6.  Compare estimates with measurements and assess solar resource (DNI, Global) }  After 1 year of on-site measurements }  1 year is not significant: }  long term estimates should prevail }  Analysis must be made by experts7.  Elaborate design year(s) from measured data }  Time series -1 year- of hourly or n-minute values }  Typical }  Percentiles (P50, P90, P10) 79 GEEN 4830 – ECEN 5007
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×