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Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
Health Campaign Fawe U
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Health Campaign Fawe U

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Developed health communication campaign for adolescent girls in Uganda regarding menstruation

Developed health communication campaign for adolescent girls in Uganda regarding menstruation

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  • 1. Health Communication Campaign on Menstruation among Adolescent Girls in Uganda Keeping Adolescent Girls in School – Every Week of Every Month Forum for African Women Educationalists - Uganda (FAWE U)
  • 2. Shared Vision Acceptance, understanding regarding menstrual hygiene needs Knowledge regarding natural body changes and proper management of personal menstrual hygiene Appropriate, adequate sanitation facilities in schools and communities Increase in attendance rate, completion of school for adolescent girls
  • 3. Current Situation Poor menstrual hygiene is a significant contributor toward school absenteeism and drop-out rates for girls Menstruation is a taboo subject Stigma associated with menstrual cycle Limited and false knowledge Feelings of shame and confusion Low self-esteem among girls
  • 4. Current Situation 1 in 10 school-age girls either skips school or drops out entirely due to embarrassment or lack of sanitation (UNICEF, 2005) No discussion and limited information makes menstruation shameful, something to hide and is ignored in families, schools and communities (FAWE U, 2003)
  • 5. Current Destination
    • Without a change in course:
    • Limited education among females
    • Continuation of gender inequality
    • Little progress for communities and country
    • Continuation of taboos, stigmas
    • Self-esteem and rights for girls and women will remain low, yet accepted
    • Overall health of women will suffer as education, knowledge is positively associated with health status
    • Girls and women will be at risk for infections, discomforts
    • Significant negative implications on mental health of girls, women
  • 6. Constraints Menstruation as a taboo subject, not openly discussed Myths, beliefs, and attitudes Knowledge, education among adults on menstruation is limited Little emphasis on education for girls in general Poor infrastructure, facilities in schools Few hygiene supplies available Funding, resources allocated to problems with immediate high mortality (infectious diseases, etc) Economy, poverty
  • 7. Root Cause and Target Audience Problem Statement: Lack of understanding and knowledge of the female reproductive system, menstruation and menstrual hygiene needs within communities Selected Audience: Adolescent girls – to increase knowledge of menstruation and personal hygiene management
  • 8. Strategy Design Use of the Theory of Reasoned Action Behavior: Practice menstrual hygiene management, stay in school Current attitudes about menstruation among girls and community members Subjective norms of responding to menstruation and menstrual hygiene needs among girls and the community Confidence, support, knowledge
  • 9. Key Benefit
    • Benefits of learning about natural body changes, menstruation and proper menstrual management include:
    • Gaining confidence in self
    • Staying in school after learning hygiene management
    • Reduce risk of infections
    • Open dialogue with family/friends
    • Dispel myths, inaccurate beliefs
    • Gain support
    • Reduce social stigma in community
  • 10. Objectives
    • Increase knowledge of menstruation by 60% among adolescent girls
    • Improve management of personal menstrual hygiene among girls by 40%
    • Reduce drop-out/absentee rate among girls by 40%
    • Over half of girls will have discussed menstruation or their menstrual hygiene needs with mother/maternal figure or friend
  • 11. Media Channels for Communication Utilize Community Based Approaches Begin campaign with: Drama acted out in schools and communities on menstruation Followed by: Group discussions among adolescent girls within schools and communities
  • 12. Media - Drama
    • Drama to be performed in schools/communities prior to group discussions
    • Adolescent girls, parents, teachers to attend
    • Participation from Ugandan women on development and direction of drama
    • Performed by native women
    • Entertaining and empowering in message
  • 13. Drama – Masani’s Story
    • Masani
    • 12 year old girl
    • Poor rural community
    • First in family to attend school, loves it
    • Dreams of being a nurse
    • Begins menstruation
    • Family not supportive, no discussion
    • Self-conscious, afraid to talk to friends
    • Begins to dread school when menstruating
    • Embarrassed, feels like a failure
    • Skips school to avoid feeling shame, humiliation
    • Grades begin to suffer, can’t catch up on schoolwork
    • Feels helpless to change situation
  • 14. Drama Drama based on Masani’s story, but develop further into how she learned about natural body changes and ways to care for herself. The drama will demonstrate her increase in confidence with this knowledge and staying in school. Main Character: Masani, 12 year old school girl Message: Normalize menstruation Goal: Gain Confidence Color: Green/purple for common logos and phrases in promotions Phrase: It’s Natural, It’s Normal, It’s You! You Can Stay in School, Every Week of Every Month
  • 15. Media - Posters / Pamphlets
    • Discussion/education meetings to take place in schools/communities among adolescent girls following drama
    • Small media useful in disseminating information
    • Encourages peer education
    • Encourage community women/mothers to assist with groups, education and discussions
  • 16. Poster (Example) “ Monthly bleeding is a natural body change for every school girl, even me!” You are like Masani! It’s Natural, It’s Normal, It’s You! You Can Stay in School, Every Week of Every Month Keeping Adolescent Girls in School –Every Week of Every Month
  • 17. Pamphlet: Basic Discussion Card (Example) The Female Reproductive System The Menstrual Cycle Around the ages of 10-15, hormones begin to be released from different parts of the body to prepare a girl for pregnancy. Every month, the body will discard blood that will pass through the vagina. This is a completely natural body change for every school girl. How long will it last? The menstrual cycle usually happens every 28 days. The time that a girl will experience bleeding will be from about 5-7 days. Usually, bleeding may be more heavy in the first few days and then become lighter. How to properly care for yourself It is important to have rags or pads that you can wear to collect the blood that will be passing. Try to wash these out a couple times a day with soap. Also be sure to wash your body with soap. This will help to keep you healthy and reduce the odor from the blood. It’s Natural, It’s Normal, It’s You! You Can Stay in School, Every Week of Every Month Menstruation: A Natural Body Change For Every Girl Keeping Adolescent Girls in School – Every Week of Every Month
  • 18. Timeline – Year 1 Monitor and evaluate Apr 2009 Mar Feb Jan Dec Nov Oct Sept Aug July June May Apr 2008 Distribute materials/discussions Perform dramas Contact schools/communities to schedule drama & discuss ways to distribute/hang signs/pamphlets Test materials/drama on audience – redesign Create small media materials with assistance from native women Develop drama for target audience Recruit women to participate with drama – development, acting Determine campaign strategy & develop evaluation plan Focus group mtgs to identify constraints & opportunities Identify needs/audience Advisory Committee mtgs Establish advisory committee in FAWE Activity
  • 19. Timeline – Year 2 Monitor and evaluate Apr 2010 Mar Feb Jan Dec Nov Oct Sept Aug July June May Apr 2009 Distribute materials/discussions Perform dramas Contact schools/communities to schedule drama & discuss ways to distribute/hang signs/pamphlets Test materials/drama on audience – redesign Create small media materials with assistance from native women Develop drama for target audience Recruit women to participate with drama – development, acting Determine campaign strategy & develop evaluation plan Focus group mtgs to identify constraints & opportunities Identify needs/audience Advisory Committee mtgs Establish advisory committee in FAWE Activity
  • 20. Budget Budget for Lead Organization (FAWE U) $1,000.00 Misc. $1,000.00 Set against Masani’s story Writers for dramas $1,000.00 Costumes, set items Materials for dramas $20,000.00 Actresses, participation in development Drama groups $75,000.00 TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM $5,000.00 Materials/people/items needed to monitor communication program Evaluation $2,000.00 Between schools, communities Transportation $3,000.00 Posters / pamphlets / info cards Printing of small media $1,500.00 Local or professional design of materials Material design for small media $40,000.00 2 p/t staff over 2 year period Salaries $500.00 Pens, paper, etc Office supplies for focus groups, mtgs, audience testing Cost Explanation Item
  • 21. Evaluation of Campaign
    • Desired Initial Results
    • Adolescent girls:
    • Learn about the female reproductive system and menstruation
    • Learn appropriate methods to care for themselves during menstruation
    • Primary Indicators
    • Number of dramas given
    • Number of group discussions
    • Number of adolescent girls attending dramas/discussions
  • 22. Evaluation of Campaign
    • Desired Intermediate Results
    • Increase knowledge of menstruation by 60%
    • Improve management of menstrual hygiene by 40% (skill development)
    • 50% of girls discuss menstruation, needs with another female (adjust attitudes, beliefs)
    • Primary Indicators
    • % of girls demonstrating increase in knowledge on survey
    • % of girls applying taught skills as stated in survey
  • 23. Evaluation of Campaign
    • Desired Sustainable Results
    • Girls discuss with friends/family menstruation and management of needs
    • Decrease in drop-out, absentee rate among girls
    • Primary Indicators
    • Shift in social norms re: menstruation and management as determined by surveys
    • Number of drop-outs, absences among girls determined through school records
  • 24. Lessons Learned Audience segmentation is crucial, know your audience Limiting communication to one key benefit, although it it tempting to list all of them! Importance of testing messages to determine desired effect Allowing the vision to be beyond the imagination, don’t limit your thinking to what “might” be possible based on resources available Must sacrifice in order to focus the message Use of behavior theories essential to communication strategy Use of P-Process very helpful to systematically guide the campaign
  • 25. Thank you! It’s Natural, It’s Normal, It’s You! You Can Stay in School, Every Week of Every Month Keeping Adolescent Girls in School – Every Week of Every Month

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