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Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
Application Guide Final
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Application Guide Final

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  • 1. Applications Responsibilities of the Material Handling Sales Professional
  • 2. Role of the Material Handling Sales Professional • Be knowledgeable about the standard configuration of the manufacturer’s products and the available options applicable to specific environments of use (Product Knowledge) • Be knowledgeable about the customer’s application and specific material handling requirements (Application Knowledge) • When appropriate, converge product knowledge & application knowledge to assist the customer in selecting the right forklift for his environment
  • 3. Role of the Material Handling End User / Customer • Be knowledgeable about the application and how the forklift is best integrated into the facility with other machinery, equipment, tasks, and people • In consultation with the material handling sales professional, select the right equipment for the application, including appropriate options • Train employees in accordance with OSHA regulations • Follow proper usage guidelines • Maintain forklifts in safe operating condition
  • 4. Current Market Coverage Class 1 13.7% 86.3% Open Covered
  • 5. Current Market Coverage Class 4 5.4% 94.6% Open Covered
  • 6. Current Market Coverage Class 5 0.3% 99.7% Open Covered
  • 7. Market Coverage 2007 Class 1 86.3% Class 4 94.6% Class 5 99.7% Total 1,4,5 94.6%
  • 8. Material Handling Applications • Working the dock – Loading and Unloading Trailers • Transporting overflow/surges in receiving • Staging manufacturing work stations and assembly lines • Working the long term storage area
  • 9. Selecting the Right Equipment • Determined by the application • Each company will have specific needs – Work cycles – Number of shifts – Expected throughput
  • 10. Basically 3 Types of Equipment • Counterbalanced – Truck length and counterweight “counterbalance” the load on the forks – Most flexible, can handle any size and type of load – Takes most amount of aisle space to turn and stack • Straddle – Outriggers “straddle” the load allowing tightest turning and stacking performance – Least flexible and therefore least popular • Reach – Combination of the above two, with reach extended takes on the characteristics of a counterbalance truck; With reach retracted has the tight turning and stacking characteristics of a straddle truck – Most flexible and therefore more popular – Limited to clean, flat surfaces and cannot be used on docks
  • 11. The 4th Type • Trucks that don’t lift the load, but simply raise it off of the floor to “transport” the load over either short or long distances • This type of equipment can be either a pallet truck or a tugger – Pallet trucks move palletized loads – Tuggers move loads on carts or trailers • Pallet trucks also make good dock trucks for loading and unloading trailers
  • 12. Dock Equipment • Several trucks to choose from • Engine powered forklifts – LPG fuel – Cushion tires for indoor use • Battery powered forklifts • Four wheel sit-down riders • Three wheel sit-down riders • Three wheel stand-up riders • Pallet trucks
  • 13. Application Questions • Gas vs. Electric? • Indoors or outdoors? • Loading / unloading trailers? • Distances to be traveled? • Through-put needed? • Work cycles expected? • Load weights to be handled? • Attachments required? • Tire type needed? • Floor or ground conditions? • Used on ramps or grades? • Aisle widths if storage racks are used? • What type of storage rack is being used?
  • 14. Engine Powered Forklifts Advantages • Immediate fuel replenishment – Able to work around the clock • Fast lift and travel speeds • Torque to climb ramps and grades • Possible outdoor use if needed
  • 15. Engine Powered Forklifts Cushion vs. Pneumatic • Cushion Tires • Pneumatic Tires – Smooth & dry surfaces – Can be used indoors or – Less traction outdoors – Lower ground clearance – More cushioning, softer – More compact ride and better traction dimensions – Usually much more – Not for rough, uneven or ground clearance wet surfaces – Larger footprint, longer and takes more space – Can get optional solid pneumatic tires to improve durability
  • 16. Electric Forklifts Advantages • No fumes and very quiet – “0” Emissions • More maneuverable • Reduced maintenance costs vs. engine powered trucks • Comparable lift and travel speeds • Lower operating costs • Lead acid battery powered or New Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology
  • 17. Four Wheel Electric Sit Down Riders – BBX / CBX • Most comparable to engine powered unit • Large diameter drive motor – High heat tolerance – Long working shifts • Normal capacities - 3,000 to 12,000 lbs. @ 24” load center
  • 18. BBX 4 Wheel Electric
  • 19. Three Wheel Electric Sit Down Rider • Greater maneuverability • Dual front wheel drive – Smaller motors than four wheel – Less heat tolerant • Normal capacities - 2,500 to 5,000 lbs. @ 24” load center
  • 20. AMX 3 Wheel Electric
  • 21. Three Wheel Electric Stand-Up Rider • Best maneuverability • Dual front wheel drive • Best if operator needs to get on/off frequently • Normal capacities - 2,500 to 5,000 lbs. @ 24” load center
  • 22. Stand-Up 3-Wheel Electric
  • 23. Other Possibilities • Combination of dock equipment and powered pallet trucks • Powered pallet trucks could be used for load movements to the staging area or trailer loading/unloading
  • 24. Operator Comfort & Safety • Seat belts and hip restraints • Comfortable seat • Convenient controls to increase productivity & efficiency • Excellent visibility for load handling • Acceleration and top speed control
  • 25. Aisle Spacing Required w/ 48” Load • Engine powered - Approx. 12’ Aisle • Four wheel electric - Approx. 12’ Aisle • Three wheel electric - Approx. 10’6” Aisle • Single reach truck - Approx. 8’6” Aisle
  • 26. High Level Order Selection • Counterbalanced order selector • Full case picking to pallets • Cycle counting for inventory • 240” to 270” – Check ceiling / sprinkler heights • Approximate 60” pick ability above platform height
  • 27. Order Selector
  • 28. Operator Comfort & Safety • Cushioned platform floor • Ample work area & efficient controls • Ability to access the racking efficiently • Safety belt & tether • Excellent visibility thru & around the mast
  • 29. Narrow Aisle Reach Truck • Single reach • Aisles set at approximately 8’6” • Load handling capacities – 3,000 to 4,500 lbs. @ 24” Load Center • 300” lift height – Reduced Capacity at @ 300”
  • 30. Narrow Aisle Reach Truck
  • 31. Several Variations for Operation • Up and over method • Keeping the truck as narrow as possible – Allows two trucks to pass in the aisle • Straddle method – Speeds up handling – Overall truck width needs to be wider
  • 32. Reach Truck Operation • Sideshifter will increase productivity • Only slight reduction in capacity • Stripe the mast for faster height selection • Electronic height selector • Camera to site pallet position
  • 33. Truck Type Application Matrix Capacities Fuel Type Environment Work Cycle Tire Type Engine Powered Up to 115,000 lbs. Gas / LPG / Indoors or Unlimited Cushion or Forklift Diesel outdoors Pneumatic Battery Powered Up to 15,500 lbs. Lead Acid Mostly Indoors Limited to Cushion or Forklift Battery, Fuel with limited Power Source Pneumatic Cell, Hybrid outdoor use Narrow Aisle Up to 4,500 lbs. Lead Acid Indoors on Limited to Cushion Reach Truck Battery, Fuel smooth flat Power Source Only Cell surfaces Powered Pallet Up to 8,000 lbs. Lead Acid Indoors on Limited to Cushion Trucks Battery, Fuel smooth flat Power Source Only Cell surfaces Walkie Stackers Up to 4,000 lbs. Lead Acid Indoors on Limited to Cushion Battery, Fuel smooth flat Power Source Only Cell surfaces
  • 34. Application Surveys
  • 35. Why should you do an “Application Survey” in the first place? • Necessary to accurately assess the customers application needs and requirements • Record vital information needed for a basis of your recommendations • Establish your professional credibility with the customer as a solution provider • Provide documentation for your dealership and your financial partner
  • 36. Why should you do an “Application Survey” in the first place? • Avoid future confrontations with the customer regarding… – Application issues that cause product problems or damage i.e. floor conditions, ramps, etc.
  • 37. Why should you do an “Application Survey” in the first place? • Avoid future confrontations with the customer regarding… – Hours of usage – stated hours usage vs. actual – Modifications to the facility that effect the forklift usage. i.e smaller aisle widths, higher rack heights, lower doorway heights, higher capacity loads, etc.
  • 38. Why should you do an “Application Survey” in the first place? • Potential protection for you, your dealership, or financial partner in the event of litigation – Right truck for the stated application! • Others?
  • 39. Application Survey Elements
  • 40. Application Survey Elements
  • 41. Application Environment • Critical to establishing costs for wear and tear, option needs, maintenance costs, etc. • Wear and tear on tires etc. • Needs for the type of environment truck will be used in
  • 42. Application Surfaces • Check all surfaces that may be encountered by the forklift during normal operation • Floor conditions, cracks, dock boards, and debris will all contribute to excessive tire wear and more possibilities of damage to the forklift • Excessive dust, dirt, metal shavings, banding etc. can be detrimental to the seals, bearings, and intake systems of the forklift and should be noted!!
  • 43. Application Survey Elements
  • 44. Application Survey Elements
  • 45. Application Survey Elements
  • 46. Survey Current Equipment • Current equipment condition will tell you a great deal!! • The past will reveal a great deal about the future • Ask about past maintenance records / habits • Check hour meters carefully – establish usage history
  • 47. Application Survey Elements
  • 48. Application Survey Elements
  • 49. Annual Hours of Truck Usage • In calculating annual hours of usage: – Be sure to consult with plant manager or supervisor for work schedule, to include… • # of shifts • Holidays • Plant shutdown, etc.
  • 50. Be Sure To Capture the Unusual • Minimum widths (main & stacking aisles) – Determine rack, door, & trailer widths • Minimum and maximum heights – Determine rack, door, rack tunnels, low clearance areas (mezzanine) & trailer heights, heaters, pipes etc. • Any Ramps or Unusual Areas? – Evaluate each ramp carefully (Length & Rise) – Grades are critical for product determination!
  • 51. Application Operations • Clarify company policy regarding lift trucks – Operator assigned to a specific unit? – Turnover - high or low? – Daily checks - required or not? • Safety is not an option, it is required!! • Any unacceptable, unsafe practices should be noted and communicated to the customer!
  • 52. In Preparation for the Survey • A Sales Professional - Tools of the Trade – 30’ Tape measure for measuring aisles, travel distance, load beam height, etc. – Need a stiff blade – Application Survey Form – Hard hat & safety glasses – Calculator – Stop watch – Pen & paper – DIGITAL CAMERA! (Ask permission before snapping any photos!!)
  • 53. Scheduling the Survey... • Setting the schedule for the survey – Notify the facility you are surveying of your time requirements – Your time as a professional is very valuable and they should respect that!! – Do not schedule the survey while trucks are idle i.e. breaks, lunch, vacation shut-down – Trucks need to be working in order to get a true view of how they are used and misused!! – Tackfully observe for yourself (You can’t always believe the customer!!)
  • 54. Final Application Survey Step • Review your findings with the customer • Record any discrepancies or inconsistencies, and come to a consensus • Gain agreement, acknowledgment, and have the customer sign the application form • Much easier before than after something bad happens!!

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