Performance Appraisal

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Want to get the salary/merit increase you deserve?

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Performance Appraisal

  1. 1. Performance Appraisal Monica L. White Facilitator
  2. 2. Performance Appraisal Overview Boss/Employee Exercise Divide into 4 small groups Each group needs to have a recorder to record your desired results and we’ll get back together as a large group in 3 minutes and report back.
  3. 3. Performance Appraisal Overview Boss/Employee Exercise Groups 1 and 2, pretend you are employees about to go into your performance review with your boss. What do you want to happened in that discussion? What results do you want?
  4. 4. Performance Appraisal Overview Boss/Employee Exercise Groups 3 and 4, pretend you are the manager about to go into a performance review discussion with your employee. What do you want to happen in that discussion? What results do you want?
  5. 5. Performance Appraisal Overview Boss/Employee Exercise Surprised? Why? If you do get these outcomes, what impact do you think it will have on performance?
  6. 6. Performance Appraisal Overview Objectives 3. Be able to establish and write results expected of your employees 5. Identify employee behavior that either enhances or detracts from effective performance. 7. Use effective listening and feedback techniques.
  7. 7. Performance Appraisal Overview Objectives 3. Prepare for and conduct effective performance reviews. 5. Use the Performance Appraisal System effectively. 7. Assist employees in making development plans.
  8. 8. Performance Appraisal Overview Benefits 3. Performance expectations and performance reviews that focus on both what the employee does and how the employee does it. 5. You will see improved competence, motivation, results, performance, etc., from your employees. 8. Performance appraisal will be a two-way process.
  9. 9. Performance Appraisal Overview AGENDA • Introductions • Objectives • The Performance Management Cycle • Performance Planning • Writing Objectives • Providing Performance Feedback – KEYS Practice • The Rating Scale • The SOLID Model
  10. 10. The Performance Management System Performance appraisal is one key management and motivational tool. An organization’s greatest resource is its people. Without a solid and effective system for developing this vital resource, organizations cannot be successful.
  11. 11. The Performance Management System STEPS OF CYCLE Performance Planning The cycle begins with Performance Planning, or setting objectives, at the beginning of the review period. Performance planning involves clarifying performance and results expectations.
  12. 12. The Performance Management System STEPS OF CYCLE Ongoing Feedback and Coaching The cycle continues with ongoing feedback between employee and manager throughout the year. You all know immediate feedback, positive and negative, is most powerful. Giving ongoing feedback will also ensure the review is not a surprise.
  13. 13. The Performance Management System STEPS OF CYCLE Performance Review As time for the review approaches, you prepare for the appraisal by reviewing performance information collected throughout the year and finalizing what you will discuss during the performance appraisal discussion.
  14. 14. The Performance Management System STEPS OF CYCLE Performance Review At the same time your employees have an opportunity to review their own performance, so that the discussion can be a dialogue.
  15. 15. The Performance Management System STEPS OF CYCLE Development Planning The performance review is then held, after which you and your employees can capitalize on strengths and develop weaker areas, through development planning.
  16. 16. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE The reviewer benefits by: • Clearly translating organizational goals into individual objectives and standards • Communicating these objectives and standards to employees
  17. 17. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE • Providing feedback to help the employee on how to achieve expectations • Coaching the employee on how to achieve expectations
  18. 18. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE • Working with the employee to develop and improve performance and potential
  19. 19. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE The reviewees benefits by: • Knowing exactly what is expected • Knowing how well they are doing • Understanding where their strengths and weaknesses are
  20. 20. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE • Understanding how they can improve job performance • Developing strategies for becoming more significant contributors
  21. 21. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE Benefits to both the reviewer and reviewee are: • A focus on results – what is actually achieved • A focus on behaviors – how goals were achieved or what kept them from being achieved • An emphasis on planning and seeing plans through to completion
  22. 22. The Performance Management System BENEFITS OF THE CYCLE • Promotion of constructive communication between reviewers and reviewees
  23. 23. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Performance Planning Exercise Think about your expectations of a manager. What activities and responsibilities do you expect from a manager during the year?
  24. 24. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Performance Planning Exercise • What do you thing my rationale was for putting some on the left and some on the right? • How is what on the left different from what is on the right?
  25. 25. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Performance Planning Exercise • On the left are results – the what of the job: • Filing reports • Solving problems • Achieving goals
  26. 26. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Performance Planning Exercise • On the right are skills or the how of the job: • Speaking clearly • Being persistent • Thinking clearly
  27. 27. The Performance Management Cycle Development Performance Planning Planning Performance Ongoing Feedback and Review Coaching
  28. 28. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Planning is the foundation upon which the rest of the cycle is built. An effective performance plan: • Defines the major areas of responsibility and performance requirements for which the employee will be held accountable
  29. 29. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Also, planning is a two-way, cooperative process, and together with your employees you should consider: • Business objectives • Job responsibilities • Special projects • Employee ability
  30. 30. The Performance Management System Phase One: Performance Planning Also, planning is a two-way, cooperative process, and together with your employees you should consider: • Previous results • Employee goals and needs
  31. 31. The Performance Management System Steps to Performance Planning There are three steps to the process: 5. Sit down with the employee to outline the job. Discuss the key areas and functions for which the person is responsible
  32. 32. The Performance Management System Steps to Performance Planning 2. Set standards. Standards can be defined as statements of conditions that will exist when the job is done satisfactorily. Standards are general and continuous (should not change from year to year); are the same for all employees for a given job; are maintenance- oriented; may be quantitative and/or qualitative. • An example would be: To maintain strong relationships with our customers.
  33. 33. The Performance Management System 3. Define performance objectives, which do vary from individual to individual, department to department, and year to year. Objectives are specific, both in terms of results and time frame; should be agreed upon by the employee and supervisor; can be short or long-term; can be of a unique project nature; may be a job standard that is currently not being met. An example would be: Improve relationship with a specific customer by contacting a certain number of times per month and increasing the number of orders by a specific amount.
  34. 34. The Performance Management System SMART Objectives – The What of the Job • Specific – Stating exactly what the targeted behavior or expected outcome is will result in greater productivity than telling someone to “do your best.” • Measurable – If the objective is concretely and objectively defined, it will be easier to measure progress and provide feedback. Feedback keeps you on track and tells how much more or less effort is required for goal attainment. Giving feedback around measurable objectives is less subjective or opinion based, come performance review time.
  35. 35. The Performance Management System SMART Objectives – The What of the Job • Accepted – An objective must be accepted before someone will own it and be energized to work toward it. • Realistic – An objective must be realistic, but challenging. To a point, the more difficult the objectives you set, the greater the effort expended to reach the objectives. • Timebound – Setting a deadline for reaching an objective increases specificity, difficulty, and measurability. Deadlines assure on-track attention to objectives.
  36. 36. The Performance Management System Providing Feedback Observing and Recording Performance Before you can give feedback, you first need to observe behavior. After you have observed an action or behavior it is a good idea to record it so you have the information for later use.
  37. 37. The Performance Management System Providing Feedback Observation Techniques • What are opportunities you have to gather information? Personal observation • Specific examples • Watch over time • Work with directly • Observe procedure or approach • Record or documents • Feedback from others
  38. 38. The Performance Management System Providing Feedback Feedback is an extremely powerful tool. It can: • Increase performance • Be motivating. You should observe the 80/20 rule whenever possible. That rule means that if you have a competent employee, overall you should be giving 80% positive feedback and 20% negative feedback.
  39. 39. The Performance Management System Providing Feedback • Reduce stress • What blocks us from giving the types of feedback we need to give? – Skills – Time – Fear – Conflict
  40. 40. The Performance Management System Giving Feedback Using KEYS KEYS MODEL K Know The Focus – State the focus of the feedback E Employee Perspective – The employee shares their perspective Y Your Perspective – The manager or coach shares their perspective S Specify Next Steps – The two of you agree to the next steps
  41. 41. The Performance Management System Know The Focus – Give the person a specific example of what you observed Employee Perspective – Give the employee time to express their feelings and thoughts about the situation Your Perspective – Express what you observed and why it is important. Tell the employee what behavior or performance you would like to see and why or tell them to continue performing as they did Specify Next Steps – Ask the employee for suggestions and share ideas. Together with the employee decide what the future course of action will be
  42. 42. The Performance Management System Human Relations Competencies Human relations skills can be defined four our purpose as: Showing awareness of, and consideration for, the opinion and feelings of others; dealing and mediating constructively with conflict; developing and maintaining positive working relationships. Human Relations Competencies: • Approachability Interpersonal Savvy • Boss Relationships Listening • Caring about Direct Reports Patience • Compassion Peer Relationships • Conflict Management Understanding Others
  43. 43. The Performance Management System Human Relations Competencies Individual Characteristics and Competencies Relevant to the Performance of Certain Jobs Certain competencies and characteristics are more critical in successful performance of certain jobs than other characteristics. The supervisor must emphasize the competencies and characteristics that are of primary importance to the specific job being evaluated.
  44. 44. The Performance Management System Human Relations Competencies Competencies: • Action Oriented Dealing with Paradox • Dealing with Ambiguity Perseverance • Composure Personal Disclosure • Creativity Personal Learning • Customer Focus Presentation Skills • Decision Quality Problem Solving • Timely Decision Making Self Development • Ethics and Value Self Knowledge • Integrity and Trust Time Management • Intellectual Horsepower Work/Life Balance • Learning on the Fly Written Communications
  45. 45. The Performance Management System Overall Performance Evaluation This employee’s performance reflects initiative, and results consistently exceed performance expectations Consistently exceeds for the job’s requirements. Contributions are made to the organization, which are significantly above those expectations expected of the position and visible to other areas of the 4 company. This employee consistently meets and often exceeds Consistently meets and often the job’s requirements. All required tasks and job exceeds expectations responsibilities are carried out in a competent manner with a minimum amount of guidance and supervision. 3 Results often exceed performance expectations for the job’s requirements. This employee consistently meets for the job’s Consistently meets expectations requirements. All required tasks and job responsibilities 2 are carried out in a competent manner with a minimum, amount of guidance and supervision. This employee achieves many but not all the job’s Partially meets expectations requirements of the position and/or requires more than 1 normal guidance and supervision. Performance is below expectations but still is considered contributory to the organization. Specific performance areas need to be addressed and corrected by the employee. A follow-up review will take place within 6 months. This employee’s performance does not meet the job’s Unacceptable requirements. Immediate performance correction must 0 be accomplished in order to justify retention. A follow- up review will take place within 3 months.
  46. 46. The Performance Management System A rating of 4 indicates that the employee is performing at an exceptional level that less than 5% of employees reach. The employee is ready for new challenges such as a promotion, projects with greater scope and responsibility or a developmental transfer. They are considered a star performer.
  47. 47. The Performance Management System A rating of 3 indicates that the employee is meeting expectations and often exceeds them. It is time to take a look at providing additional challenges for the employee. The supervisor should be aware of this when setting goals and objectives for the following year and when determining the development plan for the employee. An employee with a 3 rating is given a sufficient challenge and afforded the opportunity for growth and job satisfaction.
  48. 48. The Performance Management System A rating of 2 indicates that the employee is fulfilling the role that their position was intended for. While determining the goals, objectives and development plan for the following year it is important for an employee with a 2 rating, the supervisor must show the employee what it would take to reach a 3. It is appropriate to set expectations higher than the positions calls for. Collaboration will provide significant motivation for an employee to exceed expectations.
  49. 49. The Performance Management System A rating of 1 indicates that the employee is not fulfilling the role that their position was intended for. A rating of 1 should not come as a surprise to the employee, since some form of training, improvement plan or corrective action should have already been initiated. If an employee has not meet expectations, the organization cannot wait until review time to address the issues since all positions play a critical role in the organization’s attempt to meet its goals.
  50. 50. The Performance Management System A rating of 0 indicates that the employee’s performance is unacceptable and must improve immediately in order for the employee to continue employment at the Frazer Center. The corrective discipline process will have already been initiated, and the formal review process will only serve as further formal documentation in the process.
  51. 51. The Performance Management System The SOLID MODEL S = Structure O = Overall Evaluation L = Listen I = Inform D = Develop
  52. 52. The Performance Management System The Structure Step The reviewer tells the reviewee what is going to be discussed during the interview and how the discussion will proceed. This establishes the ground rules and lays the foundation for a dialogue.
  53. 53. The Performance Management System The Overall Evaluation Giving the rating at this point in the discussion might be the biggest change from what you already do.
  54. 54. The Performance Management System The Overall Evaluation Giving the overall rating at this time contributes to the reviewee really listening to the reviewer when he or she is talking about performance. This process works well as long as you follow up with the next step.
  55. 55. The Performance Management System The Listen Step After presenting the overall evaluation, listen, be silent, or ask open-ended questions to draw out the reviewee’s reaction to the evaluation and his or her perceptions of strengths and weaknesses.
  56. 56. The Performance Management System The Inform Step Inform the reviewee about the reason for the overall rating, including the results achieved and his or her effectiveness in each of the factor areas. The results of the informing phase should be that the person clearly understands what his or her strengths and weaknesses are, and you understand the employee’s self-evaluation. This step takes the most time.
  57. 57. The Performance Management System The Development Step The reviewer and reviewee should identify 1-3 areas for development which are of interest to both of them, and all must be important for the job. End the interview on a positive note!

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