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Chapter 2
 

Chapter 2

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  • Chapter 2: Investing and Financing Decisions and the Balance Sheet
  • Before we can adequately prepare a balance sheet, we must know what activities caused changes in it. Additionally, we have to know how specific activities affect each balance. Finally, we need to know how the company tracks balance sheet amounts.
  • The objective of financial reporting is to provide useful economic information to external users for decision-making, and for assessing future cash flows of the company. For economic information to be useful, it must be relevant, reliable, comparable and consistent. The elements of our four basic financial statements include assets, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, revenues, expenses, gains and losses.
  • The primary characteristics of financial information are relevancy and reliability. To be relevant , financial information must have a predictive value, it must provide the user with feedback, and it must be presented in a timely manner. To be reliable , financial information must be verifiable, represent the underlying facts, and be neutral. The secondary characteristics of economic information are comparability and consistency. Comparability means that we can compare information across companies. Consistency means that the company uses the same accounting rules on measurements from one accounting period to the next.
  • Assets are economic resources that have probable future benefits to the company. Liabilities are probable future sacrifices of economic resources. Stockholders’ equity represents the financing provided by the owners of the business. Revenues represent the increase in assets or settlement of liabilities from the ongoing operations of the company in its effort to make a profit. Expenses represent decreases in assets or increases in liabilities from the ongoing operations of the company to make a profit. Gains represent increases in assets or settlements of liabilities that are only peripheral to the operations of the business. Gains are not an integral part of the companies operations. Losses represent decreases in assets or increases in liabilities that are from peripheral activities not central to the operations of the business.
  • The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) are working on a joint project to develop a common conceptual framework toward convergence of accounting standards. In December 2009, the final draft of the first phase of the joint project was being written on the “The Objective of Financial Reporting and Qualitative Characteristics and Constraints of Decision-Useful Financial Reporting Information.” The following is a summary: Objective of Financial Reporting : To provide financial information about the reporting entity that is useful to present and potential equity investors, lenders, and other creditors in making decisions in their capacity as capital providers. Qualitative Characteristics (limited by materiality and costs): Fundamental (to be useful):  Relevance  Faithful representation Enhancing (degrees of usefulness):  Comparability Verifiability Timeliness Understandability
  • Assets are economic resources with probable future benefits owned or controlled by an entity as a result of past transactions. In other words, they are the acquired resources the entity can use to operate in the future. To be reported, assets must have a measurable, verifiable value, usually based on the purchase price. Liabilities are probable debts or obligations (claims to a company’s resources) that result from a company’s past transactions and will be paid with assets or services. Entities that a company owes money to are called creditors. Stockholders’ equity (also called owners’ equity or shareholders’ equity) is the financing provided by the owners and by business operations. Owner-provided cash (and sometimes other assets) is referred to as contributed capital. Owners invest in the business and receive shares of stock as evidence of ownership.
  • Most companies list assets in order of liquidity , or how soon an asset is expected by management to be turned into cash or used. Notice that several of Papa John’s assets are categorized as current assets. Current assets are those resources that Papa John’s will use or turn into cash within one year (the next twelve months). Note that inventory is always considered a current asset, regardless of how long it takes to produce and sell the inventory. Papa John’s current assets include Cash, Accounts Receivable, Supplies, Prepaid Expenses, and Other Current Assets (a summary of several current assets with individually smaller balances). These are typical titles utilized by most entities. All other assets are considered long term (or noncurrent). That is, they are to be used or turned into cash beyond the coming year. For Papa John’s, that includes Long-Term Investments, Property and Equipment (net of amounts used in the past), Notes Receivable (to be paid to Papa John’s by its franchisees over several years), Intangibles (such as trademarks and patents), and Other Assets. Just as assets are reported in order of liquidity, liabilities are usually listed on the balance sheet in order of maturity (how soon an obligation is to be paid).Current liabilities are obligations that will be settled by providing cash, goods, or services within the coming year. Papa John’s balance sheet includes five liabilities: two current liabilities that include Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses Payable, as well as three noncurrent liabilities, including Unearned Franchise Fees, Notes Payable, and Other Long-Term Liabilities. Ower-provided cash (and sometimes other assets) is referred to as contributed capital. The largest investor in Papa John’s International, Inc., is John Schnatter, founder and CEO, who owns approximately 21 percent of the stock. Mutual funds, other corporate employees, directors, and the general public own the rest. Owners who invest (or buy stock) in a company hope to benefit from their investment in two ways: receipts of dividends, which are a distribution of a company’s earnings (a return on the shareholders’ investment), and gains from selling the stock for more than they paid (known as capital gains). Earnings that are not distributed to the owners but instead are reinvested in the business by management are called retained earnings.
  • Most transactions with external parties involve exchanges where the business entity gives up something and receives something in return. Accounting focuses on certain events that have an economic impact on the entity. Those events that are recorded as part of the accounting process are called transactions. As the definitions of assets and liabilities indicate, only economic resources and debts resulting from past transactions are recorded on the balance sheet. Transactions include two types of events: External events: These are exchanges of assets, goods, or services by one party for assets, services, or promises to pay (liabilities) by one or more other parties. Examples include the purchase of a machine from a supplier, sale of merchandise to customers, borrowing cash from a bank, and investment of cash in the business by the owners. Internal events: These include certain events that are not exchanges between the business and other parties but nevertheless have a direct and measurable effect on the entity. Examples include using up insurance paid in advance and using buildings and equipment over several years.
  • For many years, companies have faced a growing pressure to estimate and disclose environmental liabilities, such as the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. Current GAAP requires companies to record and report a reasonable estimate of any probable future environmental liabilities associated with an asset, if a reasonable amount can be projected.  Changing attitudes toward environmental stewardship along with recent federal and state legislative initiatives are adding to the challenge of recording and disclosing environmental liabilities. As this text is being written, new accounting rules are proposed to estimate possible losses. This could likely cause companies to disclose more potential environmental liabilities at higher amounts. However, more uncertainty will exist as to identifying, calculating, and disclosing relevant information.
  • In the process of accounting we use accounts to help us organize information about various transactions. These transactions can be both external and internal.
  • To facilitate the recording of transactions, each company establishes a chart of accounts , a list of all account titles and their unique numbers. The accounts are usually organized by financial statement element, with asset accounts listed first, followed by liability, stockholders’ equity, revenue, and expense accounts in that order. Every company creates its own chart of accounts to fit the nature of its business activities. This slide lists various account titles that are quite common and are used by most companies. The exhibit also provides special notes to help you in learning account titles. When you are completing assignments and are unsure of an account title, refer to this listing for help.
  • Transaction analysis is the process of studying a transaction to determine its economic effect on the entity in terms of the accounting equation (also known as the fundamental accounting model). As accountants, every transaction we deal with affects at least two accounts. As we record the transactions we must make sure that the accounting equation remains in balance.
  • The accounting process involves the identification of the accounts affected by a transaction. We must determine whether the accounts are assets, liabilities or stockholders’ equity. After we determine the accounts affected, we determine the direction of the effect, such as whether the account increased or decreased. Finally, we must make sure the accounting equation remains in balance.
  • Papa John’s engages in the following events during January 2009, the month following the balance sheet shown earlier in the presentation. Account titles are from that balance sheet, and remember that, for simplicity, all amounts are in thousands of dollars. Papa John’s first transaction (lettered a) is to issue $2,000 of additional common stock to new investors for cash. The two accounts affected were the cash account, an asset, that increases by $2,000, and contributed capital, an equity account, that also increases by $2,000. As you can see, after identifying and classifying the accounts in transaction a, the accounting equation is in balance. The left side of the equation, the asset account Cash increased by $2,000, and on the right side the stockholders’ equity account Contributed Capital increased by $2,000.
  • Events ( a ) and ( b ) are financing transactions. Companies that need cash for investing purposes (to buy or build additional facilities) often seek funds by selling stock to investors as in event ( a ) or by borrowing from creditors as in event ( b ). Notice that the accounting equation is in balance after the identification and classification of the accounts involved in the transactions.
  • For entry c, Papa John’s purchases new ovens, counters, refrigerators, and other equipment costing $10,000, paying $2,000 in cash and signing a two-year note for the balance. In this transaction there are three accounts involved: (1) Cash, an asset that decreases by $2,000, (2) Equipment, an asset that increases by $10,000, and (3) Notes Payable, a liability that increases by $8,000. The accounting equation remains in balance with total assets of $16,000, and total liabilities and stockholders’ equity of $16,000.
  • In transaction d, Papa John’s lends $3,000 cash to new franchisees who sign notes agreeing to repay the loans in five years. The accounting equation is in balance because we have an increase and decrease in two asset accounts for the same amount.
  • In transaction e, Papa John’s purchases the stock of other companies as a long-term investment, paying $1,000 cash. The accounting equation remains in balance because we are merely exchanging one asset, Cash, for another asset, Investments. There is no impact on the liabilities and stockholders’ equity section of the equation.
  • In transaction f, the board of directors of Papa John’s declares that the Company will pay $3,000 in cash dividends to shareholders next month. Retained Earnings represent the profits available to shareholders. When a company’s board of directors declares a cash dividend, Retained Earnings is reduced. Thus, the company receives a reduction in the profits it has available to distribute to shareholders. On the other hand, until the dividends are paid, the company gives shareholders a promise to pay the dividends (called Dividends Payable). After the identification and classification of the transaction, the accounting equation is still in balance. This transaction did not impact the asset side of the equation.
  • For most organizations, recording transaction effects and keeping track of account balances in the manner just presented is impractical. To handle the multitude of daily transactions that business generates, companies establish accounting systems, usually computerized, that follow a cycle. The accounting cycle, illustrated on this slide, highlights the primary activities performed during the accounting period to analyze, record, and post transactions. In Chapters 2 and 3, we will illustrate these activities during the period. In Chapter 4, we will complete the accounting cycle by discussing and illustrating activities at the end of the period to adjust the records, prepare financial statements, and close the accounting records.
  • During the accounting period, transactions that result in exchanges between the company and other external parties are analyzed and recorded in the general journal in chronological order, and the related accounts are updated in the general ledger. These formal records are based on two very important tools used by accountants: journal entries and T-accounts. From the standpoint of accounting systems design, these analytical tools are a more efficient way to reflect the effects of transactions, determine account balances, and prepare financial statements. As future business managers, you should develop your understanding and use of these tools in financial analysis. For those studying accounting, this knowledge is the foundation for an understanding of the accounting system and future accounting coursework.
  • Throughout this course we are going to use the T-account as a tool to represent a ledger account. “T-account” is merely a shorthand term for the entire ledger account. The T-account has a left side, called the debit side, and a right side, called the credit side. As we saw earlier, transaction effects increase and decrease assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity. To reflect these effects efficiently, we need to structure the transaction analysis model in a manner that shows the direction of the effects. As shown on this slide, the critical structural factor is the following: • The increase symbol + is located on the left side of the T for accounts on the left side of the accounting equation (assets) and on the right side of the T for accounts on the right side of the equation (liabilities and stockholders’ equity). From this transaction analysis model, we can observe the following: • Asset accounts increase on the left (debit) side; they have debit balances. It would be highly unusual for an asset account, such as Inventory, to have a negative (credit) balance. • Liability and stockholders’ equity accounts increase on the right (credit) side, creating credit balances. The words debit and credit have no specific meaning other than that they represent a left and right side of the ledger account.
  • To remember which accounts debits increase and which accounts credits increase, recall that a debit (left) increases asset accounts because assets are on the left side of the accounting equation (A = L + SE). Similarly, a credit (right) increases liability and stockholders’ equity accounts because they are on the right side of the accounting equation. The graphic on this slide summarizes how debits and credits impact assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity accounts.
  • Typical general journal entries might look something like this. It is useful to include a date or some form of reference for each transaction. The debited accounts are written first with the amounts on the left side of the two columns. The credited accounts are written below the debits and are usually indented in a manual system. It is useful to include a date or some form of reference for each transaction. The debited accounts are written first (on top) with the amounts on the left side of the two columns. The credited accounts are written below the debits and are usually indented in manual records; the credited amounts are written in the right column. The order of the debited accounts or credited accounts does not matter, as long as the debits are on top and the credits are on the bottom and indented to the right.
  • By themselves, journal entries do not provide the balances in accounts. After the journal entries have been recorded, the bookkeeper posts (transfers) the dollar amounts to each account affected by the transaction to determine the new account balances. As a group, the accounts are called a general ledger. In the manual accounting system used by some small organizations, the ledger is often a three-ring binder with a separate page for each account. In a computerized system, accounts are stored on a disk.
  • Recall our first transaction where Papa John’s issued $2,000 of additional common stock to new investors for cash. We first record this transaction in the general journal. We debit, or increase, the cash account for $2,000, and credit, or increase, contributed capital for $2,000. The beginning balance in the cash account is $6,000. We post our transaction by moving the $2,000 to the debit, or left side, of the cash account. The beginning balance in contributed capital is $1,000. We complete the posting by moving the $2,000 to the credit, or right side, of the contributed capital account.
  • Papa John’s borrowed $6,000 from a local bank, signing a three-year note. We record this entry in the general journal with the debit, or increase, to the cash account, and a credit, or increase, to the notes payable account. We post the entry by placing the $6,000 on the debit, or left side, of the cash account,. Next, we post the $6,000 credit to the right side of the notes payable account.
  • In a classified balance sheet assets and liabilities are classified into two categories – current and noncurrent. Current assets are those to be used or turned into cash within the upcoming year, whereas noncurrent assets are those that will last longer than one year. Current liabilities are those obligations to be paid or settled within the next 12 months with current assets.
  • Here is the consolidated balance sheet of Papa John’s for the periods ended January 31, 2009, and December 31, 2008. Most published balance sheets are comparative in nature. That is, it compares the account balances of two or more periods. When multiple periods are presented the most recent balance sheet amounts are usually listed on the left. It is a common convention in accounting that dollar signs are indicated at the top and bottom of the asset section and top and bottom of the liabilities and shareholders’ equity section.
  • Although IFRS differ from GAAP, they use the same system of analyzing, recording, and summarizing the results of business activities that you learned. One place where IFRS differ from GAAP is in the formatting of financial statements. Although financial statements prepared using GAAP and IFRS include the same elements (assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, etc.), a single, consistent format has not been mandated. Consequently, various formats have evolved over time, with those in the U.S. differing from those typically used internationally. The formatting differences include those identified on this slide. Of the differences listed, balance sheet order is the most striking. GAAP begins with current items whereas IFRS begins with noncurrent items. Consistent with this, assets are listed in decreasing order of liquidity under GAAP, but internationally are usually in increasing order of liquidity. IFRS similarly emphasize longer-term financing sources by listing equity before liabilities and, within liabilities, by listing noncurrent liabilities before current liabilities (decreasing time to maturity). The key to avoiding confusion is to be sure to pay attention to the subheadings in the statement. Any account under the heading “liabilities” must be a liability.
  • Users of financial information compute a number of ratios in analyzing a company’s past performance and financial condition as input in predicting its future potential. How ratios change over time and how they compare to the ratios of the company’s competitors or industry averages provide valuable information about a company’s strategies for its operating, investing, and financing activities. Creditors and security analysts use the current ratio to measure the ability of the company to pay its short-term obligations with short-term assets. Generally, the higher the ratio, the more cushion a company has to pay its current obligations if future economic conditions take a downturn. However, a company with a high current ratio might still have liquidity problems if the majority of its current assets consist of slow-moving inventory. The primary causes for the overall decrease were a decrease in inventories (a current asset) and an increase in debt due in the current period (a current liability) for stock repurchases and restaurant acquisitions as part of its growth strategy. In some cases, analysts would be concerned about both the level and trend, but the situation is understandable when considering the nature of the business. The current ratio for Papa John’s shows a low level of liquidity, below 1.0, and the ratio has decreased since 2006, although there was an improvement in the ratio between 2007 and 2008. The primary causes for the overall decrease were a decrease in inventories (a current asset) and an increase in debt due in the current period (a current liability) for stock repurchases and restaurant acquisitions as part of its growth strategy. In some cases, analysts would be concerned about both the level and trend, but the situation is understandable when considering the nature of the business. In addition, the company has over $10 million in cash and was able to generate over $73 million in cash from operating activities in 2008. On balance, most analysts would not be concerned about Papa John’s liquidity.
  • Recall from Chapter 1 that companies report cash inflows and outflows over a period in their statement of cash flows. This statement divides all transactions that affect cash into three categories: operating, investing, and financing activities. Operating activities are covered in Chapter 3. Investing activities include buying and selling noncurrent assets and investments. Financing activities include borrowing and repaying debt including short-term bank loans, issuing and repurchasing stock, and paying dividends. When cash is involved, these activities are reported on the statement of cash flows. (When cash is not included in the transaction, such as when a building is acquired with a long-term mortgage note payable, there is no cash effect to include on the statement of cash flows. You must see cash in the transaction for it to affect the statement of cash flows.) In general, the effects of such activities are as shown on this slide.
  • On your screen is an abbreviated statement of cash flows for Papa John’s for the month ended January 31, 2009. The pattern of cash flows shown here (net cash outflows for investing activities and net cash inflows from financing activities) is typical of Papa John’s past several annual statements of cash flows. Companies seeking to expand usually report cash outflows for investing activities.
  • End of chapter 2.

Chapter 2 Chapter 2 Presentation Transcript

  • Investing and Financing Decisions and the Balance Sheet Chapter 2 McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Understanding the Business To understand amounts appearing on a company’s balance sheet we need to answer these questions: What business activities cause changes in the balance sheet? How do specific activities affect each balance? How do companies keep track of balance sheet amounts?
  • The Conceptual Framework Objective of Financial Reporting To provide useful economic information to external users for decision making and for assessing future cash flows. Qualitative Characteristics Relevancy Reliability Comparability Consistency Elements of Statements Asset Liability Stockholders’ Equity Revenue Expense Gain Loss
  • The Conceptual Framework Objective of Financial Reporting To provide useful economic information to external users for decision making and for assessing future cash flows. Elements of Statements Asset Liability Stockholders’ Equity Revenue Expense Gain Loss
    • Primary Characteristics
    • Relevancy: predictive value,
    • feedback value, and timeliness.
    • Reliability: verifiability,
    • representational faithfulness,
    • and neutrality.
    • Secondary Characteristics
    • Comparability: across
    • companies.
    • Consistency: over time.
    Qualitative Characteristics Relevancy Reliability Comparability Consistency Elements of Statements Asset Liability Stockholders’ Equity Revenue Expense Gain Loss
  • The Conceptual Framework Objective of Financial Reporting To provide useful economic information to external users for decision making and for assessing future cash flows. Asset: economic resource with probable future benefits. Liability: probable future sacrifices of economic resources. Stockholders’ Equity: financing provided by owners and business operations. Revenue: increase in assets or settlement of liabilities from ongoing operations. Expense: decrease in assets or increase in liabilities from ongoing operations. Gain: increase in assets or settlement of liabilities from peripheral activities. Loss: decrease in assets or increase in liabilities from peripheral activities. Qualitative Characteristics Relevancy Reliability Comparability Consistency Elements of Statements Asset Liability Stockholders’ Equity Revenue Expense Gain Loss
  • International Perspective Reconsidering the Conceptual Framework Objective of Financial Reporting : To provide financial information about the reporting entity that is useful to present and potential equity investors, lenders, and other creditors in making decisions in their capacity as capital providers. Qualitative Characteristics (limited by materiality and costs): Fundamental (to be useful): Enhancing (degrees of usefulness):  Relevance  Comparability  Faithful representation  Verifiability  Timeliness  Understandability The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) are working on a joint project to develop a common conceptual framework toward convergence of accounting standards.
  • Elements of the Balance Sheet A = L + SE (Assets) ( Liabilities ) (Stockholders’ Equity) Economic resources with probable future benefits owned or controlled by the entity. Measured by the historical cost principle. Probable debts or obligations (claims to a company’s resources) that result from a company’s past transactions and will be paid with assets or services. Entities that a company owes money to are called creditors. The financing provided by the owners and by business operations. Often referred to as contributed capital.
  • Papa John’s Balance Sheet
  • Nature of Business Transactions
    • Most transactions with external parties involve an exchange where the business entity gives up something but receives something in return.
  • A Question of Ethics
  • Accounts An organized format used by companies to accumulate the dollar effects of transactions. Cash Equipment Inventory Notes Payable
  • Chart of Accounts A chart of accounts lists all account titles and their unique numbers.
  • Principles of Transaction Analysis
    • Every transaction affects at least two accounts (duality of effects).
    • The accounting equation must remain in balance after each transaction.
    A = L + SE (Assets) ( Liabilities ) (Stockholders’ Equity)
  • Balancing the Accounting Equation
    • Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects
      • Identify the accounts (by title) affected and make sure at least two accounts change.
      • Classify them by type of account. Was each account an asset (A), a liability (L), or a stockholders’ equity (SE)?
      • Determine the direction of the effect. Did the account increase [+] or decrease [-]?
    • Step 2: Verify account equation is in balance.
      • Verify that the accounting equation (A = L + SE) remains in balance.
  • Analyzing Transactions (a) Papa John’s issues $2,000 of additional common stock to new investors for cash. Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects 1. Cash (+A) $2,000. 2. Contributed Capital (+SE) $2,000. A = L + SE Step 2: Is the accounting equation in balance?
  • Analyzing Transactions (b) Papa John’s borrows $6,000 from the bank signing a three-year note. Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects 1. Cash (+A) $6,000. 2. Notes Payable (+L) $6,000. A = L + SE Step 2: Is the accounting equation in balance?
  • Analyzing Transactions (c) Papa John’s purchases new ovens, counters, refrigerators, and other equipment costing $10,000, paying $2,000 in cash and signing a two-year note for the balance. Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects 1. Equipment (+A) $10,000. 2. Cash (-A) $2,000 Notes Payable (+L) $8,000. A = L + SE Step 2: Is the accounting equation in balance?
  • Analyzing Transactions (d) Papa John’s lends $3,000 cash to new franchisees who sign notes to be repaid in five years. Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects 1. Notes Receivable (+A) $3,000. 2. Cash (-A) $3,000. A = L + SE Step 2: Is the accounting equation in balance?
  • Analyzing Transactions (e) Papa John’s purchases the stock of another company as a long-term investment, paying $1,000 in cash. Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects 1. Investments (+A) $1,000. 2. Cash (-A) $1,000. A = L + SE Step 2: Is the accounting equation in balance?
  • Analyzing Transactions (f) The board of directors declares that Papa John’s will pay $3,000 in cash dividends to shareholder next month. Step 1: Identify and classify accounts and effects 1. Retained Earnings (-SE) $3,000. 2. Dividends Payable (+L) $3,000. A = L + SE Step 2: Is the accounting equation in balance?
  • The Accounting Cycle
    • During the Period
    • (Chapters 2 and 3)
    • Analyze transactions
    • Record journal entries in the general journal
    • Post amounts to the general ledger
    Start of new period
    • At the End of the Period
    • (Chapter 4)
    • Prepare a trial balance to determine if debits equal credits
    • Adjust revenues and expenses and related balance sheet accounts (record in journal and post to ledger)
    • Prepare a complete set of financial statements and disseminate it to users
    • Close revenues, gains, expenses, and losses to Retained Earnings (record in journal and post to ledger)
  • How Do Companies Keep Track of Account Balances? General Journal T-accounts General Ledger
  • Transaction Analysis Model Debits and credits affect the Balance Sheet Model as follows: “ T-account” is merely a shorthand term for the entire ledger account. The T-account has a left side, called the debit side, and a right side, called the credit side. Assets (many accounts) = Liabilities (many accounts) + Stockholders’ Equity (two accounts) + − − + Contributed Capital Retained Earnings debit credit debit credit − + − + debit credit debit credit Investments by owners Dividends declared Net income of business T-Account (Any account) debit credit
  • Summary Assets = Liabilities + Stockholders’ Equity ↑ with Debits ↑ with Credits ↑ with Credits Accounts have debit balances Accounts have credit balances Accounts have credit balances
  • Analytical Tool: The Journal Entry
    • A journal entry might look like this:
    Reference: Letter, number, or date. Account Titles: Debited accounts on top. Credited accounts on bottom usually indented. Amounts: Debited amounts on left. Credited amounts on right.
  • The T-Account
    • After journal entries are prepared, the accountant posts (transfers) the dollar amounts to each account affected by the transaction.
    Post Ledger
  • Papa John’s issues $2,000 of additional common stock to new investors for cash. (a)
  • The company borrows $6,000 from the local bank, signing a three-year note.
  • Classified Balance Sheet In a classified balance sheet assets and liabilities are classified into two categories – current and noncurrent . Current assets are those to be used or turned into cash within the upcoming year, whereas noncurrent assets are those that will last longer than one year. Current liabilities are those obligations to be paid or settled within the next 12 months with current assets.
  • k
  • International Perspective Understanding Foreign Financial Statements Although financial statements prepared using GAAP and IFRS include the same elements (assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, etc.), a single, consistent format has not been mandated. Consequently, various formats have evolved over time, with those in the U.S. differing from those typically used internationally. The formatting differences include:
  • Key Ratio Analysis 2006 = 0.83 2007 = 0.68 2008 = 0.75 Current Ratio Current Assets Current Liabilities = Current ratio for Papa John’s: The current ratio for Papa John’s shows a low level of liquidity, below 1.
  • Focus on Cash Flows Companies report cash inflows and outflows over a period in their statement of cash flows.
  • Investing and Financing Activities Agrees with the amount of the balance sheet.
  • End of Chapter 2