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5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
5. principles of training
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5. principles of training

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Quick review of Training Principle Definitions

Quick review of Training Principle Definitions

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • 1. PRINCIPLES OF TRAINING 2
  • 2. TRAINING PRINCIPLES Individuality  Overload Specificity Reversibility Variation Recovery Periodisation
  • 3. INDIVIDUALITY Individuals may be predisposed to a particular component of fitness without training: strength, power, speed, endurance, flexibility, agility, balance. Individuals may respond at different rates to various types of training. Some athletes may have a greater recovery time than others. Some athletes may have a greater tolerance to training than others. THEREFORE, INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMS.
  • 4. Therefore training programs must be written to suit the individual! YOU!
  • 5. OVERLOAD To get a continual adaptation, training VOLUME (FREQUENCY or DURATION) or INTENSITY should be gradually increased to force to body to respond to stimuli. A solid, biomechanically correct base must be established first. Even the best training program can cause injury.
  • 6. Overload Training should commence slowly No sudden increases 10% per week (rough estimate) Cycle hard & easy sessions 48-72 hours between hard sessions
  • 7. PERIODISATION Training plans/programs need to be divided into smaller phases. Typically the training year has three phases: Transition or off season phase. Preparatory or pre-season phase. Competitive or in-season phase. Each of these phases can be further divided into: macrocycles (6 weeks). microcycles (1 week). The training year should have manageable and measurable short term goals. Cycle macro and micro cycles - eg. Strength, speed, power, recovery. Cycle easy and hard training sessions by varying the volume, intensity and rest.
  • 8. PERIODISATION
  • 9. PERIODISATION
  • 10. SPECIFICITY Training should mimic competition demands: movement and energy systems components of fitness intensity and work interval non-specific carry over effects mental rehearsal and practice
  • 11. REVERSIBILITY  "Use it or lose it" Adaptation works in both directions Strength Vs endurance  Obtain, Maintain or Re-gain.
  • 12. VARIATION Provide variety in training programs/task s to maintain interest and motivation.
  • 13. RECOVERY  Training programs must allow for adequate recovery time.  Hard sessions should be followed by enough recovery time to allow the body to repair any damage and adapt.  Not enough recovery can lead to a reduced rate of improvement and injury.
  • 14. PASSIVE RECOVERY No physical activity at all  during rest period.  Suitable for low volume exercise and very low intensity exercise.
  • 15. ACTIVE RECOVERY  Very low intensity exercise during recovery period eg. Walking, light jog, spinning on bike..)  Helps keep blood pumping so fresh blood can clear the muscles of lactic acid and provide more oxygen and glycogen for quicker recovery.  Essential for high volume exercise of moderate to high intensity.
  • 16. RECOVERY (CONT’D)  Massage between light sets is beneficial in the removal of lactic acid.  Mild stretching between heavy sets will allow for more complete contractions in the following sets.  Extending the between set recovery time is the most effective method of getting the same total reps in each set.

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