E.1.8, E.1.9

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Explain why the aims of human factors may conflict with other design aims.Explain that the ergonomic data required in systems design depends on the role of people in that system.

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  • E.1.8 Explain why the aims of human factors may conflict with other design aims Examine the notion of optimum compromise and consider cost, form, function, which may be more important aims to achieve in a specific design context. E.1.9 Explain that the ergonomic data required in systems design depends on the role of people in that system Consider an operator of a system or a user of a system. Reduced system efficiency and failures that occur early in the life cycle are frequently caused by poor human factors design.
  • E.1.8, E.1.9

    1. 1. Option E Human Factors Design Human Factors Design E.1.8 E.1.9
    2. 2. E.1.8 Explain why the aims of human factors may conflict with other design aims <ul><li>The activity of designing involves the consideration of many things, and by understanding the nature of the of the problem and exploring different alternatives can a solution be found. Those considerations include that it must be economical, safe, materials chosen for construction should be appropriate to both form and function. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of these design considerations appear to be in conflict with each other, but it is argued that human factors are the most important consideration when designing products, systems and environments. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Task <ul><li>Examine the pictures below and explain why there is a conflict of design aims </li></ul>
    4. 4. Task <ul><li>Check out the website www.baddesigns.com , find some other examples and highlight conflicting design aims </li></ul><ul><li>Discus the code of ethics at http://www.hfes.org/web/AboutHFES/ethics.html which may suggest why there may be a conflict. </li></ul>
    5. 5. E.1.9 Explain that the ergonomic data required in systems design depends on the role of people in that system <ul><li>If a manufacturer makes a product, system or environment, that is unsafe, uncomfortable, or presents the user with some other problem then the product, system or environment fails in the most basic sense. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Integrating Human Factors and the Design Process <ul><li>“ Traditional approaches to manufacturing systems design utilize a sequential procedure that focuses on production capacity requirements, with human operator task design developed late in the systems design phase. Implementing manufacturing systems in this way is difficult when operations management must design flexible and efficient processes, with an often incomplete understanding of how people can best perform within the system.” </li></ul>Abstract by V Paquet
    7. 7. <ul><li>There is a need for more design relevant information in terms of ergonomics, in order that designers design for usability. </li></ul><ul><li>How can ergonomic data improve the design of an operating system? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The incorporation of ergonomic data into a new product design provides a more precise starting point for evidence-based design decision-making. It also ensures that these products are generated from information of the intended end-user. </li></ul></ul>Human Factors: the balance between the user and the system
    8. 8. <ul><li>How can the design process be improved to include human factors design? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The consideration of human beings in the creation of products, equipment, and environments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The development of procedures fro performing work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The evaluation of the things people use. </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Task <ul><li>What types of ergonomic data is relevant and needs to be collected in the following examples of systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Forestry work - tree surgeon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task: Chopping and cutting of mature trees </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fire – fire fighting activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task: Putting out a blazing house fire </li></ul></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Links <ul><li>http://www.baddesigns.com/index.shtml Bad designs ideas and suggested solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.visualexpert.com/Resources/humanvsdesignerror.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.hfes.org/web/AboutHFES/ethics.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.usernomics.com/ergonomics-standards.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/0967-3334/27/8/R01 </li></ul><ul><li>An integrated methodology for manufacturing systems design using manual and computer simulation by Victor Paquet http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/102522741/ABSTRACT?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/393/part3/selker.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.fao.org/docrep/n9800e/n9800e05.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://acm.org/sigchi/bulletin/1996.3/marti.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/archive/CSI/WP/wp97-04B.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.he-alert.org/documents/centrespreads/centrespread_7.pdf </li></ul>

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