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    • Current Events Project-by Tracy Tonny
      • Most Memorable
      • Most Amazing/Outrageous
      • Most Heroic/Tragic
      • Most Controversial
      • Most Illness Issue
      • Most Astonishing
    • MOST MEMORABLE Obama Wins Election; McCain Loses as Bush Legacy Is Rejected Doug Mills/The New York Times Supporters of Senator Barack Obama cheered during a rally in Chicago on Tuesday as they heard that he won in Pennsylvania. By ADAM NAGOURNEY Published: November 4, 2008   Mr. Obama’s election amounted to a national catharsis — a repudiation of a historically unpopular Republican president and his economic and foreign policies, and an embrace of Mr. Obama’s call for a change in the direction and the tone of the country. But it was just as much a strikingly symbolic moment in the evolution of the nation’s fraught racial history, a breakthrough that would have seemed unthinkable just two years ago. Mr. Obama, 47, a first-term Democratic senator from Illinois, defeated Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, a former prisoner of war who was making his second bid for the presidency. Mr. McCain offered a gracious concession speech at the Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix shortly after 11:15 p.m. Eastern time, quieting his booing supporters more than once when he mentioned Mr. Obama’s name. “Senator Obama has achieved a great thing for himself, and for his country,” he said, adding that he was sorry that Mr. Obama’s grandmother, Madelyn Dunham, who helped raise him during his teenage years, had not lived to see the day; she died on Sunday. “ These are difficult times for our country, and I pledged to him tonight to do all in my power to help him lead us through the many challenges we face,” Mr. McCain said. “I urge all Americans who supported me to join me in not just congratulating him, but offering our next president our goodwill and earnest effort to find ways to come together.” To the very end, Mr. McCain’s campaign was eclipsed by an opponent who was nothing short of a phenomenon, drawing huge crowds epitomized by the tens of thousands of people who turned out to hear Mr. Obama’s victory speech in Grant Park in Chicago. Mr. McCain also fought the headwinds of a relentlessly hostile political environment, weighted down with the baggage left to him by President Bush and an economic collapse that took place in the middle of the general election campaign.   The day shimmered with history as voters began lining up before dark — hours before polls opened — to take part in the culmination of a campaign that, over the course of two years, commanded an extraordinary amount of attention from the American public. As the returns became known, and Mr. Obama passed milestone after milestone, winning Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Iowa and New Mexico — many Americans rolled into the streets to celebrate what many described, with perhaps overstated if understandable exhilaration, a new era in a country where just 143 years ago, Mr. Obama, as a black man, could have been owned as a slave.
      • For Republicans, especially the conservatives who have dominated the party for nearly three decades, the night represented a bitter setback and left them contemplating where they now stand in American politics.
      • Mr. Obama led his party in a decisive sweep of Congress, putting Democrats in control of both the House and the Senate — by overwhelming numbers — and the White House for the first time since 1995, when Bill Clinton was president. The president-elect and his expanded Democratic majority now faces the task of governing the country through a difficult period: the likelihood of a deep and prolonged recession.
      • The roster of defeated Republicans included some notable party moderates — including Senator John Sununu of New Hampshire and Rep. Chris Shays of Connecticut— signaling that the Republican conference that convenes in Washington next January will not only be smaller, but more conservative.
      • Mr. Obama will come into office after an election in which he laid out a number of clear promises: to cut taxes for most Americans, to get the United States out of Iraq in a fast ifand? orderly fashion, and to expand health care. In a recognition of the difficult transition he faces, given the economic crisis, Mr. Obama is expected to begin filling White House jobs as early as this week.
      • The Democratic sweep took down some well-known Republican senators, including Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina and John E. Sununu of New Hampshire. But Democrats failed to achieve the 60-seat majority required to prevent Republican filibusters.
      • Mr. Obama defeated Mr. McCain in Ohio, a central battleground in American politics, despite a huge effort that brought Mr. McCain and his running-mate, Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska, back there repeatedly. Ohio was a state Mr. Obama lost decisively to Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York in the Democratic primary.
      • Mr. McCain failed to take from Mr. Obama the two Democratic states that were at the top of his target list: New Hampshire and Pennsylvania. And in addition to Ohio, Democrats captured two other Republican states, Iowa and New Mexico.
      • Mr. Obama comes into office with Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr., Democrat of Delaware, his vice-presidential running mate. Even before the final results were called, there were indications that Mr. McCain’s advisers were in fact unhappy with their vice-presidential candidate, Ms. Palin, who was announced by Mr. McCain to an explosion of enthusiasm and interest by conservatives and since caused a series of embarrassments for Mr. McCain.
    • SUMMARY
      • Barack Obama’s presidency has made a call for a change in the direction and the tone of this county. But this was a symbolic moment that showed that this was impossible just two years ago. Mr. Obama, 47, a first-term Democratic senator from Illinois, defeated Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, a former prisoner of war who was running as the President of the United States. John McCain made a speech at the Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix when he was trying to quiet all his booing supporters more than once. When he mentioned Obama’s name he said “Senator Obama has achieved a great thing for himself, and for his country” and that he was sorry that Obama’s grandmother, Madelyn Dunham, who helped raised president Obama couldn’t live throughout this day to see what his grandson had accomplished. McCain also said “These are difficult times for our country, and I pledged to him tonight to do all in my power to help him lead us through the many challenges we face, I urge all Americans who supported me to join me in not just congratulating him, but offering our next president our goodwill and earnest effort to find ways to come together.”
      • The day still continued to making history as voters began lining up before dark and before the polls were opened to take part in history and the campaign, over the course of 2 years this commanded an extraordinary amount of attention from the American public. Barack Obama began winning after another he won, winning Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Iowa and New Mexico. People were on the streets to celebrate what many described “with perhaps overstated if understandable exhilaration, a new era in a country where just 143 years ago, Mr. Obama, as a black man, could have been owned as a slave. Obama led his party putting Democrats in control of both the House and the Senate and the White House for the first time since 1995, when Bill Clinton was president. The president-elect and his expanded Democratic majority now face the task of governing the country through a difficult period: the likelihood of a deep and prolonged recession.”
      • Obama will come into office in which he laid out a number of clear promises like to cut taxes for most Americans, to get the US out of Iraq in a fast ifand, orderly fashion and to expand health care. The Democratic sweep took down some well-known Republican senators, including Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina and John E. Sununu of New Hampshire. But Democrats failed to achieve the 60-seat majority required to prevent Republican filibusters. Obama defeated Mr. McCain in Ohio, a central battleground in American politics, despite a huge effort that brought Mr. McCain and his running-mate, Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska, back there repeatedly. Ohio was a state Mr. Obama lost decisively to Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York in the Democratic primary.
      • McCain failed to take the two Democratic states from Obama which were on the top of his target list, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania. Mr. Obama comes into office with Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr., Democrat of Delaware, his vice-presidential running mate. People were very happy that our new and first black president is Barack Obama. This will show others in the future that not only one kind can be a part of something big.
    • EXPLANATION
      • I’ve chosen the article “ Obama Wins Election; McCain Loses as Bush Legacy Is Rejected “ as my most memorable article . I've chosen this article to represent this category because I felt that having a new president is really important. And now that we have our very own first black president it makes this time even more precious to know that we lived throughout history. Since this election started, people have been hoping that Obama would win, and now they got what they have hoped. Ever since Bush has gave Obama his place in the presidency people living in the United States hoped for starting a brand new life where Obama would change the world. Since this category was about one of the most memorable things that happened I choose the presidency of Obama because many people will remember this day forever in their lives. The first black president in the US is definitely a memorable thing to be proud of.
    • MOST AMAZING/OUTRAGEOUS Komodo dragon attacks terrorize villages Residents of Indonesian islands have lived with reptiles for generations Dita Alangkara / AP fileA Komodo dragon walks on a beach on Komodo island, Indonesia, Thursday, April 30, 2009. Attacks on humans by Komodo dragons — said to number at around 2,500 in the wild — are rare, but seem to have increased in recent years. Video    KOMODO ISLAND, Indonesia - Komodo dragons have shark-like teeth and poisonous venom that can kill a person within hours of a bite. Yet villagers who have lived for generations alongside the world's largest lizard were not afraid — until the dragons started to attack. The stories spread quickly across this smattering of tropical islands in southeastern Indonesia, the only place the endangered reptiles can still be found in the wild: Two people were killed since 2007 — a young boy and a fisherman — and others were badly wounded after being charged unprovoked. Komodo dragon attacks are still rare, experts note. But fear is swirling through the fishing villages, along with questions on how best to live with the dragons in the future. Main, a 46-year-old park ranger, was doing paper work when a dragon slithered up the stairs of his wooden hut in Komodo National Park and went for his ankles dangling beneath the desk. When the ranger tried to pry open the beast's powerful jaws, it locked its teeth into his hand. "I thought I wouldn't survive... I've spent half my life working with Komodos and have never seen anything like it," said Main, pointing to his jagged gashes, sewn up with 55 stitches and still swollen three months later. "Luckily, my friends heard my screams and got me to hospital in time."Komodos, which are popular zoo exhibits from the United States to Europe, grow to be 10 feet (3 meters) long and 150 pounds (70 kilograms). All of the estimated 2,500 left in the wild can be found within the 700-square-mile (1,810-square-kilometer) Komodo National Park, mostly on its two largest islands, Komodo and Rinca. The lizards on neighboring Padar were wiped out in the 1980s when hunters killed their main prey, deer. Though poaching is illegal, the sheer size of the park — and a shortage of rangers — makes it almost impossible to patrol, said Heru Rudiharto, a biologist and reptile expert. Villagers say the dragons are hungry and more aggressive toward humans because their food is being poached, though park officials are quick to disagree. The giant lizards have always been dangerous, said Rudiharto. However tame they may appear, lounging beneath trees and gazing at the sea from white-sand beaches, they are fast, strong and deadly. The animals are believed to have descended from a larger lizard on Indonesia's main island Java or Australia around 30,000 years ago. They can reach speeds of up to 18 miles (nearly 30 kilometers) per hour, their legs winding around their low, square shoulders like egg beaters.
    • When they catch their prey, they carry out a frenzied biting spree that releases venom, according to a new study this month in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The authors, who used surgically excised glands from a terminally ill dragon at the Singapore Zoo, dismissed the theory that prey die from blood poisoning caused by toxic bacteria in the lizard's mouth. "The long, jaded teeth are the primary weapons. They deliver these deep, deep wounds," said Bryan Fry of the University of Melbourne. "But the venom keeps it bleeding and further lowers the blood pressure, thus bringing the animal closer to unconsciousness." Four people have been killed in the last 35 years (2009, 2007, 2000 and 1974) and at least eight injured in just over a decade. But park officials say these numbers aren't overly alarming given the steady stream of tourists and the 4,000 people who live in their midst.”`Any time there's an attack, it gets a lot of attention," Rudiharto said. "But that's just because this lizard is exotic, archaic, and can't be found anywhere but here."Still, the recent attacks couldn't have come at a worse time. The government is campaigning hard to get the park onto a new list of the Seven Wonders of Nature — a long shot, but an attempt to at least raise awareness. The park's rugged hills and savannahs are home to orange-footed scrub fowl, wild boar and small wild horses, and the surrounding coral reefs and bays harbor more than a dozen whale species, dolphins and sea turtles. Claudio Ciofi, who works at the Department of Animal Biology and Genetics at the University of Florence in Italy, said if komodos are hungry, they may be attracted to villages by the smell of drying fish and cooking, and "encounters can become more frequent." Villagers wish they knew the answer. They say they've always lived peacefully with Komodos. A popular traditional legend tells of a man who once married a dragon "princess." Their twins, a human boy, Gerong, and a lizard girl, Orah, were separated at birth. When Gerong grew up, the story goes, he met a fierce-looking beast in the forest. But just as he was about to spear it, his mother appeared, revealing to him that the two were brother and sister. "How could the dragons get so aggressive?" Hajj Amin, 51, taking long slow drags off his clove cigarettes, as other village elders gathering beneath a wooden house on stilts nodded. Several dragons lingered nearby, drawn by the rancid smell of fish drying on bamboo mats beneath the blazing sun. Also strolling by were dozens of goats and chickens. "They never used to attack us when we walked alone in the forest, or attack our children," Amin said. "We're all really worried about this."The dragons eat 80 percent of their weight and then go without food for several weeks. Amin and others say the dragons are hungry partly because of a 1994 policy that prohibits villagers from feeding them. "We used to give them the bones and skin of deer," said the fisherman. Villagers recently sought permission to feed wild boar to the Komodos several times a year, but park officials say that won't happen. "If we let people feed them, they will just get lazy and lose their ability to hunt," said Jeri Imansyah, another reptile expert. "One day, that will kill them. " The attack that first put villagers on alert occurred two years ago, when 8-year-old Mansyur was mauled to death while defecating in the bushes behind his wooden hut. People have since asked for a 6-foot-high (2-meter) concrete wall to be built around their villages, but that idea, too, has been rejected. The head of the park, Tamen Sitorus, said: "It's a strange request. You can't build a fence like that inside a national park!"
    • SUMMARY In a place called Komodo Island, Indonesia there are animals called Komodo dragons. They are mysterious animals that have shark-like teeth and poisonous venom that can kill a person within hours of a bite. Even if the dragons are still living there the villagers who have lived there for generations alongside the world's largest lizard were not afraid, until the dragons started to attack. Two people have been killed since 2007: a young boy and a fisherman. Others were badly wounded after dragon attacks. Komodo dragon attacks are still rare but people in nearby villages are about continuing to live with the dragons. But fear is swirling through the fishing villages, along with questions on how best to live with the dragons in the future. Main, a 46-year-old park ranger, was doing paper work when a dragon slithered up the stairs of his wooden hut in Komodo National Park and went for his ankles dangling beneath the desk. When the ranger tried to pry open the beast's powerful jaws, it locked its teeth into his hand. "I thought I wouldn't survive... I've spent half my life working with Komodo Dragons and have never seen anything like it," said Main, pointing to his jagged gashes, sewn up with 55 stitches and still swollen three months later. "Luckily, my friends heard my screams and got me to hospital in time." Komodo Dragons are popular in zoo exhibits from the United States to Europe, they grow to be 10 feet long and about 150 pounds. Some villagers say that the dragons are hungry and more aggressive towards humans because their food is being poached. Poaching is the illegal hunting, fishing, or eating of wild plants or animals contrary to local and international conservation and wildlife management laws. However tame they may appear, lounging beneath trees and gazing at the sea from white-sand beaches, they are fast, strong and deadly. They can reach speeds of up to 18 miles (nearly 30 kilometers) per hour, their legs winding around their low, square shoulders like egg beaters. Attacks on humans by Komodo dragons — said to number at around 2,500 in the wild — are rare, but seem to have increased in recent years. Komodo Dragons are very dangerous animals that mean no harm but they just want something to eat so they decide to choose humans. When they catch their prey, they carry out a frenzied biting spree that releases venom, according to a new study this month in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Four people have been killed in the last 35 years (2009, 2007, 2000 and 1974) and at least eight injured in just over a decade. Claudio Ciofi, who works at the Department of Animal Biology and Genetics at the University of Florence in Italy, said if komodos are hungry, they may be attracted to villages by the smell of drying fish and cooking, and "encounters can become more frequent.“Villagers say they've always lived peacefully with Komodos. A popular traditional legend tells of a man who once married a dragon "princess." Their twins, a human boy, Gerong, and a lizard girl, Orah, were separated at birth. When Gerong grew up, the story goes, he met a fierce-looking beast in the forest. But just as he was about to spear it, his mother appeared, revealing to him that the two were brother and sister. "They never used to attack us when we walked alone in the forest, or attack our children," Amin said. "We're all really worried about this."The dragons eat 80 percent of their weight and then go without food for several weeks. Amin and others say the dragons are hungry partly because of a 1994 policy that prohibits villagers from feeding them. The attack that first put villagers on alert occurred two years ago, when 8-year-old Mansyur was mauled to death while defecating in the bushes behind his wooden hut.
    • EXPLANATION I've chosen the article called “ Komodo dragon attacks terrorize villages “ as the most amazing article because a animal like the Komodo dragon is a interesting animal. With their shark- like teeth they can bite off a human arm. That’s how vicious they are. I think that this is the most amazing article because the Komodo Dragons can be anywhere, anytime. They can be in your house maybe right now. Even though it may be impossible for that animal to come into your house. They are in exhibits in the United States. People who are lizard fans seem to be attracted by this creature. Back then, people used to feed these types of creatures. But they stopped since people told them to stop feeding them. This is a amazing article because there were many attacks that the Komodo Dragons did to humans. Humans thought that these dragons were harmless in many ways. But when they started to realize what advantage the dragons were doing to them they started to get scared.
      • MOST HEROIC
      • This hero was born to fly
      • Pilot behind the miraculous water landing has always aimed high, earning flying license in high school then becoming Air Force officer
      • BY JENNIFER MALONEY |
      • January 19, 2009
      • Chesley Burnett Sullenberger, the hero pilot of Flight 1549, pictured in his Denison High School yearbook in 1969.
      • Chesley Burnett Sullenberger wanted to fly from the time he was a boy, watching fighter jets roar over his small hometown in Texas. After a long career as a commercial pilot, Air Force fighter pilot, accident investigator and safety expert, Sullenberger, 57, faced his own emergency yesterday, landing US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson River. As the last passengers climbed onto ferry boats, Sullenberger walked the entire plane, twice, making sure that no one was left behind, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said at a news conference last night. "I'm not surprised at all," said Doug Hoover, 58, who was a high school classmate of the pilot in Denison, Texas. "This is his first chance to be a hero, but he always had it in him. He would have gone down with the ship, if that's what it took."
      • Denison was home to an Air Force jet training base. "We grew up with jets buzzing around and he was in love with that from the get-go," Hoover said. Sullenberger took private lessons and earned his private pilot's license when he was a junior in high school, said Jim Russell, 57, another classmate who played with Burnett in the junior high and high school marching bands. "Occasionally, he would take me up in a plane," Russell said. "We would fly around and look at everything." Sullenberger, known then as Burnett, was a committed kid with a sharp mind and strong sense of duty, his friends said. He could cut it up with the rest of them, Hoover said, but he remained focused on one thing. "He didn't want to do anything to hurt his chances to get into the Air Force Academy," Hoover said. "He never got into any mischief whatsoever."
      • His father was a dentist and his mother taught elementary school. Both parents encouraged his flying dreams, Hoover said. He passed the academy's rigorous entry requirements in 1969 and headed to Colorado Springs. Commissioned four years later as an Air Force officer, Sullenberger, who now goes by the nickname "Sully," soon developed an interest in accident prevention. A fighter pilot flying F-4 Phantom II jets, he served as a member of the U.S. Air Force mishap investigation board. In 1980, he joined US Airways and began a long civilian career as a pilot, investigator, researcher and entrepreneur, founding Safety Reliability Methods, a company that helps businesses improve their safety. Sullenberger now lives in Danville, Calif., where he is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Center for Catastrophic Risk Management, which studies safety, infrastructure, and preparedness in accidents and natural disasters. Sullenberger was the right person to guide passengers through a crisis, Karlene Roberts, a friend who co-directs the center told the Contra-Costa Times of Walnut Creek, Calif. "I can imagine him being sufficiently in charge to get those people out," Roberts said. "He's got that kind of personality, which is to his credit." A few minutes after takeoff yesterday, Sullenberger told air traffic control that he had experienced a "multiple bird strike," said Bill McLoughlin, a union representative at LaGuardia Airport for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. Both engines quit. Passengers said Sullenberger told them to brace for impact, then landed on the water. "He was phenomenal," said passenger Joe Hart, 50, of Massapequa. "He landed it. I tell you what - the impact wasn't a whole lot more than a rear-end [collision]. It threw you into the seat ahead of you." While politicians and passengers lauded Sullenberger as a hero yesterday, his wife fielded calls from reporters. Reached by phone, she said simply that she was proud of him. Staff writers Eden Laikin and Andrew Strickler and The Associated Press contributed to this story.
    • SUMMARY
      • In Texas a boy named Chesley Burnett Sullenberger always wanted to fly ever since he was a little boy. Watching all the fighter jets roar over his small hometown made him know what he wanted to be when he grew up. He was a commercial pilot, Air Force fighter pilot, accident investigator and safety expert. He was determined to keep his job accurate and safe as possible delivering the passengers to their destination.
      • Sullenberger, who is 57, faced his own emergency when he landed US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson River. It was a very difficult task, but surprisingly he managed to do it. As the last passengers climbed onto ferry boats, Sullenberger walked the entire plane, twice, making sure that no one was left behind, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said at a news conference last night. Jim Russell, a classmate who played with Burnett in the junior high and high school marching bands said that he took private lessons and earned his private pilot's license when he was a junior in high school. "Occasionally, he would take me up in a plane," Russell said. "We would fly around and look at everything."Sullenberger, known then as Burnett, was a committed kid with a sharp mind and strong sense of duty, his friends said. He could cut it up with the rest of them, Hoover said, but he remained focused on one thing.
      • His father was a dentist and his mother taught elementary school. Both parents encouraged his flying dreams, Hoover said.In 1980, he joined US Airways and began a long civilian career as a pilot, investigator, researcher and entrepreneur, founding Safety Reliability Methods, a company that helps businesses improve their safety. Sullenberger now lives in Danville, Calif., where he is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Center for Catastrophic Risk Management, which studies safety, infrastructure, and preparedness in accidents and natural disasters. Sullenberger was the right person to guide passengers through a crisis."I can imagine him being sufficiently in charge to get those people out," Roberts said. "He's got that kind of personality, which is to his credit." A few minutes after takeoff yesterday, Sullenberger told air traffic control that he had experienced a "multiple bird strike," said Bill McLoughlin, a union representative at LaGuardia Airport for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. Both engines quit.
      • Passengers said Sullenberger told them to brace for impact, then landed on the water. "He was phenomenal," said passenger Joe Hart, 50, of Massapequa. "He landed it. I tell you what - the impact wasn't a whole lot more than a rear-end [collision]. It threw you into the seat ahead of you."
      • Chesley Burnett Sullenberger definitely is a true hero who saved many people from being dead. He is truly a person to look up to and a important person to trust and develop a relationship with. Everyone was proud to call him a hero.
      • Ive chosen the article “This hero was born to fly” as my most heroic article. I think that this article fits this category because this person saved many lives from being damaged. He literally made a plane “fly” on water. This person’s name is Chesley Burnett Sullenberger. He was a very big hero that day. I mean flying a plane on water when its suppose to be in the air is just amazing. This was a remarkable thing what Chesley Burnett Sullenberger has done. He made sure everyone was off the plane, on to the ferries. I have chosen this article to be in the most heroic catergory because without Sullenberger many peoples wouldn’t be alive. Since he was very alert in safety and in being a pilot, He did what was best for the plane and the passengers.
      EXPLANATION
    • Most Controversial
      • Some Stem Cell Research Limits Lifted
      • By GARDINER HARRIS
      • Published: April 17, 2009
      • WASHINGTON — The Obama administration announced Friday that it planned to lift some but not all federal financing restrictions on human embryonic stem cell research, drawing criticism both from abortion opponents and from scientists who had expected a more liberal policy.
      • Guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health to carry out an order made last month by President Obama would allow research with federal financing only on stem cells derived from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. The money would still be prohibited for stem cell lines created solely for research purposes and for embryos created through a technique known as therapeutic cloning.
      • During the campaign last year, Mr. Obama said he supported “therapeutic cloning of stem cells,” a policy his administration rejected Friday. A White House spokesman, Reid Cherlin, said the president “directed N.I.H. to formulate the best method for moving forward with stem cell research, both ethically and scientifically,” in an independent process.
      • Many scientists praised the new guidelines as an expected compromise.
      • “ I think it’s a big step forward,” said Richard O. Hynes, a cancer researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “although there are aspects of stem cell research that will still be outside federal funding.”
      • Others called the proposed rules a sellout.
      • “ I’m disappointed,” said Dr. Irving Weissman, the director of the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Institute at Stanford. Dr. Weissman accused the health institutes of “putting this ideological barrier in the way” of treating disease.
      • Abortion opponents predicted that the administration would soon embrace less restrictive stem cell policies.
      • “ This is clearly part of an incremental strategy to desensitize the public to the concept of killing human embryos for research purposes,” said Douglas Johnson of the National Right to Life Committee.
      • The acting director of the health institutes, Dr. Raynard S. Kington, said that in writing the guidelines, officials had taken into account ethical considerations and “broad public support” for the use of discarded embryos from fertility clinics.
      • “ As science changes,” Dr. Kington said, “we will take note of that and, when appropriate, reconsider the guidelines.”
      • Sitting on more than $10 billion in stimulus money, health institute officials have been eager to expand financing for stem cell research. Under restrictions put in place by President George W. Bush, just 21 stem cell lines have been eligible for federal financing. But researchers using private money have created more than 700 stem cell lines, some with specific diseases or mutations, many of which may now be eligible for federal financing.
    • Some scientists said new rules requiring that donors be informed of all options could render too many new cell lines ineligible. And the rules could make ineligible for future federal financing even some cell lines approved by Mr. Bush. Dr. George Q. Daley, the director of the stem cell transplantation program at Children’s Hospital Boston, said his team had used private financing to create 15 stem cell lines from poor-quality embryos that clinicians had told couples they should discard. Not all couples may have been told that they could donate the weakened embryos to other couples, a requirement under the new guidelines. “ My major concern,” Dr. Daley said, “is grandfathering all those medically important lines” made under less stringent consent policies, including some approved by Mr. Bush. The announcement on Friday is likely to kick off a rush of applications from scientists eager for federal support for stem cell research. The health institutes has approved 20 such proposals for financing, although the projects have been delayed until the stem cell guideline is finalized. In fiscal year 2008, the health institutes financed 260 research projects, at a cost of $88 million, that involved stem cell lines approved by Mr. Bush. “ In a relatively short period of time, we’re likely to greatly increase the number of stem cell lines eligible for federal funding,” Dr. Kington said. “Ultimately, this will have a significant impact on human health and disease.” The new guidelines will be published next week in the Federal Register, and the health institutes then will accept comments for 30 days. The rules are to be final by July 7. Some in Congress have promised to introduce legislation that would allow financing of more stem cell lines. Representative Diana DeGette, Democrat of Colorado, said in a statement that the proposed legislation would “promote all forms of ethical stem cell research.” A statement from Representative Michael N. Castle, Republican of Delaware, said there was “opportunity for more expansive guidelines.” Staff members for both lawmakers said they could not describe details of the legislation or whether it would seek to legalize federal financing of research using embryos created by therapeutic cloning. Mr. Johnson of the National Right to Life Committee said the DeGette and Castle legislation would almost certainly undermine the few restrictions left in place by Mr. Obama. Many scientists believe that the development of matched organs for transplantation would be possible only with therapeutic cloning or somatic cell nuclear transfer, a process by which genetic material from a patient is placed in the nucleus of an egg to produce embryonic stem cells that are an identical genetic match. “ You can’t even apply for funding now if you have a cell line derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer that faithfully reproduces, say, juvenile diabetes,” Dr. Weissman said. But Dr. Kington said this cell transfer process had never been successfully carried out in human cells. And other scientists have suggested that if scientists create 1,000 or more genetically distinct stem cell lines, organs could be grown that would be a close enough genetic match to avoid rejection by patients’ immune systems.
    • SUMMARY On Friday the Obama administration announced that it planned to lift some but not all federal financing restrictions on human embryonic stem cell research, drawing criticism both from abortion opponents and from scientists who had expected a more liberal policy. Guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health that to make a order sent by last month by President Obama which would allow people to research federal financing only on stem cells derived from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. The money would still be prohibited for stem cell lines created solely for research purposes and for embryos created rough a technique known as therapeutic cloning. Many scientists praised the new guidelines as an expected compromise.“I think it’s a big step forward,” said Richard O. Hynes, a cancer researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “although there are aspects of stem cell research that will still be outside federal funding.” Others called the proposed rules a sellout.“I’m disappointed,” said Dr. Irving Weissman, the director of the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Institute at Stanford. Dr. Weissman accused the health institutes of “putting this ideological barrier in the way” of treating disease. Abortion opponents predicted that the administration would soon embrace less restrictive stem cell policies.“This is clearly part of an incremental strategy to desensitize the public to the concept of killing human embryos for research purposes,” said Douglas Johnson of the National Right to Life Committee. Health institute officials have been eager to expand financing for stem cell research,just 21 stem cell lines have been eligible for federal financing. But researchers using private money have created more than 700 stem cell lines, some with specific diseases or mutations, many of which may now be eligible for federal financing. Dr. George Q. Daley, the director of the stem cell transplantation program at Children’s Hospital Boston, said his team had used private financing to create 15 stem cell lines from poor-quality embryos that clinicians had told couples they should discard. Not all couples may have been told that they could donate the weakened embryos to other couples, a requirement under the new guidelines.“My major concern,” Dr. Daley said, “is grandfathering all those medically important lines” made under less stringent consent policies, including some approved by Mr. Bush. The announcement on Friday is likely to kick off a rush of applications from scientists eager for federal support for stem cell research. The health institutes has approved 20 such proposals for financing, although the projects have been delayed until the stem cell guideline is finalized. In fiscal year 2008, the health institutes financed 260 research projects, at a cost of $88 million, that involved stem cell lines approved by Mr. Bush. “In a relatively short period of time, we’re likely to greatly increase the number of stem cell lines eligible for federal funding,” Dr. Kington said. “Ultimately, this will have a significant impact on human health and disease.”   Some in Congress have promised to introduce legislation that would allow financing of more stem cell lines. Many scientists believe that the development of matched organs for transplantation would be possible only with therapeutic cloning or somatic cell nuclear transfer, a process by which genetic material from a patient is placed in the nucleus of an egg to produce embryonic stem cells that are an identical genetic match.
    • EXPLANATION Ive chosen the article “ Some Stem Cell Research Limits Lifted “ as my most controversial article because many people have different opinions about the stem cell research. Some people are against it because they say that its killing a human being. A baby, that can have a new life. The people that are to it think that its better so that the scientists can find cures for different diseases such as cancer. They think that its better to have one person not live than hundreds. The both sides of the story are correct, no one is really disagreeing to either opinion.
      • Mexico faces criticism over speed, strength of swine flu response
      • NIKO PRICE | Associated Press Writer
      • 8:34 PM EDT, April 27, 2009
      • MEXICO CITY (AP) — Two weeks after the first known swine flu death, Mexico still hasn't given medicine to the families of the dead. It hasn't determined where the outbreak began or how it spread. And while the government urges anyone who feels sick to go to hospitals, feverish people complain ambulance workers are scared to pick them up. A portrait is emerging of a slow and confused response by Mexico to the gathering swine flu epidemic. And that could mean the world is flying blind into a global health storm. Despite an annual budget of more than $5 billion, Mexico's health secretary said Monday that his agency hasn't had the resources to visit the families of the dead. That means doctors haven't begun treatment for the population most exposed to swine flu, and most apt to spread it. It also means medical sleuths don't know how the victims were infected — key to understanding how the epidemic began and how it can be contained.
      • Foreign health officials were hesitant Monday to speak critically about Mexico's response, saying they want to wait until more details emerge before passing judgment. But already, Mexicans were questioning the government's image of a country that has the crisis under control. "Nobody believes the government anymore," said Edgar Rocha, a 28-year-old office messenger. He said the lack of information is sowing distrust: "You haven't seen a single interview with the sick!" The political consequences could be serious. China was heavily criticized during the outbreak of SARS for failing to release details about the disease, feeding rumors and fear. And Mexico's failed response to a catastrophic 1985 earthquake is largely credited with the demise of the party that had ruled the country since the 1920s. "That is foremost in the minds of Mexican policymakers now," said George Grayson at the College of William & Mary in Virginia. "They're thinking, 'We don't want another '85.'" Indeed, Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova was defensive at a news conference Monday as he was peppered with questions about why Mexico took so long to identify the outbreak, attempt to contain its spread and provide information.
      Most Illness Issue
      • "We never had this kind of epidemic in the world," he said. "This is the first time we have this kind of virus." It remained unclear where and how the epidemic began, how it has spread, who it has killed or how fast it is growing. And the government has yet to take some basic steps critical to containing any outbreak, such as quick treatment of people who had contact with the victims. In the town of Xonacatlan, just west of Mexico City, Antonia Cortes Borbolla told The Associated Press that nobody has given her medicine in the week since her husband succumbed to raging fever and weakened lungs that a lab has confirmed as swine flu. No health workers have inspected her home, asked how her husband might have contracted the illness or tested the neighbors' pigs, she said. Cordova acknowledged that her case isn't unique. "We haven't given medicine to all of them because we still don't have enough personnel," he said. Cordova said he couldn't provide information on the victims for reasons of confidentiality, but promised to eventually release a statistical breakdown. He said he couldn't provide that data now "because it's being processed." Asked whether he could at least say how many of the 20 confirmed victims were men and how many were women, he said: "I don't have that information." The government has insisted it acted quickly and decisively when presented with the evidence of a new virus. But even as it did so, it acknowledged the outbreak began earlier than April 12, the date it had previously linked to the first case. Cordova confirmed Monday that a 4-year-old boy who was part of an outbreak in eastern Veracruz state that began in February had swine flu. He later recovered. Residents of the town of Perote said at the time that they had a new, aggressive bug — even taking to the streets to demonstrate against the pig farm they blamed for their illness — but were told they were suffering from a typical flu. It was only after U.S. labs confirmed a swine flu outbreak that Mexican officials sent the boy's sample in for swine flu testing. Mexico's Agriculture Department said Monday that inspectors found no sign of swine flu among pigs around the farm in Veracruz, and that no infected pigs have been found yet anywhere in Mexico. Meanwhile, some people complained that health workers were turning them away, even as officials urged people to seek treatment quickly if they felt symptoms of flu coming on.
      • Elias Camacho, a 31-year-old truck driver with fever, cough and body aches, was ordered out of a government ambulance Sunday because paramedics complained he might be contagious, his father-in-law told the AP. When family members took him to a hospital in a taxi, Jorge Martinez Cruz said, a doctor told him he wasn't sick. Camacho was finally admitted to the hospital — and placed in an area marked "restricted" — after a doctor at a private clinic notified state health authorities, Martinez said. In Mexico City, Jose Isaac Cepeda said two hospitals refused to treat his fever, diarrhea and joint pains. The first turned him away because he wasn't registered in the public health system, he said. The second, he said, didn't let him in "because they say they're too busy."
    • SUMMARY
      • The main disease in Mexio at the moment is called Swine Flu. Many people are close to dying and have died from it already. The government is suggesting anyone that feels sick or feverish to go to hospitials. Even ambulances are scared to pick patients up, worried that might catch this deadly sickness. No one was aware of the flu and did not know how people got infected or spread. Rumors and fear have spread across the nation. Medical doctors say we have never had such an epidemic before in the world and it’s the first time we’ve had such a virus attack. In the town of Xonacatlan, just west of Mexico City, Antonia Cortes Borbolla told the press that nobody has given her medicine in the week since her husband succumbed to raging fever and weakened lungs that a lab has confirmed as swine flu. In Veracruz a young 4 year old boy who was part of an outbreak in eastern Veracruz state that began in February had swine flu and recovered later. A 31-year-old truck driver Elias Camacho was with a fever, cough and body aches, was ordered out of a government ambulance Sunday because paramedics complained he might be contagious, his father-in-law told the AP. When family members took him to a hospital in a taxi, Jorge Martinez Cruz said, a doctor told him he wasn't sick. He was finally admitted to the hospital and placed in an area marked "restricted" after a doctor at a private clinic notified state health authorities.
    • EXPLANATION
      • Ive chosen the article “ Mexico faces criticism over speed, strength of swine flu response” as my most illness issue because in Mexico and in other countries there is a illness called the swine flu that is spreading. It even reached the United States. This article explains about swine flu and how it is affecting people. People can possibly die from this flu. This is a very serious deal because since the chances of getting swine flu still isn't very high but you should always be careful and look out for germs.
      • MOST ASTONISHING
      • A ‘Slumdog’ Kind of Night at the Oscar Ceremony
      • Monica Almeida/The New York Times
      • Accepting the best director award, Mr. Boyle paid tribute to the people of Mumbai, who figured by the thousands in his film. “You dwarf even this guy,” he said, looking at his Oscar statuette. Minutes later, “Slumdog Millionaire” was named best picture, helping give the evening a distinctly international tilt.
      • Mr. Boyle, 52, has been known for putting an inspirational twist on often dark and sophisticated movies that have included “Trainspotting,” about heroin addiction, and “Sunshine,” about sacrifice on a mission to reignite the sun.
      • The many prizes for “Slumdog Millionaire” — whose writer, Simon Beaufoy, was honored for best adapted screenplay, among others prizes for the film — completed the film’s steady march past competitors like “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” from Paramount Pictures and “Frost/Nixon” from Universal Pictures.
      • The best picture award was a first for Fox Searchlight, which distributed “Slumdog Millionaire” in the United States. In the past, the studio appeared to narrowly miss the big prize with a series of comic best picture nominees that included “Little Miss Sunshine,” “Sideways” and “The Full Monty.”
      • In what was widely perceived to be one of the year’s few tight races, Sean Penn was named best actor for his performance in the title role in “Milk.”
      • “ You Commie, homo-loving sons of guns,” said Mr. Penn, who edged aside Brad Pitt and Mickey Rourke, among others, for the best actor Oscar, his second.
      • Best actress honors went to Kate Winslt for her performance in “The Reader” as a German woman who becomes romantically involved with a teenager and later conceals her role in the Holocaust.
      • Hollywood has been taking on more and more of a global tilt with each passing year, but on this evening it was especially evident in the show and in the awards themselves.
      • After Penélope Cruz won for best supporting actress for her role in “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” she gave part of her speech in Spanish — she said backstage it was a dedication to the actors and people of Spain — and then suggested backstage that the movies had to grow beyond the bounds of strictly American stories. “We are all mixed together, and it has to be reflected in the cinema,” she said.
      • The supporting actress award, the night’s first, was presented by no less than five past winners of the prize, Whoopi Goldberg, Tilda Swinton Eva Marie Saint Goldie Hawn and Anjelica Huston. The heavy show of star power was meant to make good on a promise that the broadcast would deliver entertainment value that reached far beyond that offered by the nominees.
      • Heath Ledger, in a widely anticipated development, posthumously won the best supporting actor prize for his performance as the Joker in “The Dark Knight.” Mr. Ledger’s parents afterward said his Oscar statuette would be held in trust by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
      • Many other awards also went to those favored in the preshow betting.
      • Dustin Lance Black won the best original screenplay Oscar for “Milk,” about the gay-rights advocate Harvey Milk. Mr. Black, who is openly gay, said Mr. Milk’s story had given him hope that one day he might “fall in love and even get married.”
      • Mr. Beaufoy, whose “Slumdog” screenplay was based on a novel by Vikas Swarup, rattled off a list of places he never expected to be — “the moon, the South Pole, the Miss World podium and here” — as he accepted that award for his work on a film that captured many of the movie industry’s pre-Oscar honors and was widely viewed as a preordained winner of the evening’s final award, for best picture.
      • Also in the first wave of awards, “Wall-E” was named best animated film, though it had been denied the best picture nomination that its backers at the Walt Disney Company and its Pixar Animation unit had sought.
      • Overall, Sunday evening’s Oscar show became a struggle between the ambitions of a producing team — headed by the veteran film producer Laurence Mark and the filmmaker Bill Condon — that aimed for an evening full of surprises and the apparent determination of 5,810 voters in the academy to bestow honors largely where they were expected to go.
      • A much-discussed new format for the show opened with a loosey-goosey showbiz number and proceeded along very self-referential lines, with lots of inside jokes that drew substantial laughs from the crowd inside the Kodak Theater here.
      • Hugh Jackman, the evening’s host, started with a very short comic monologue that poked fun at his own failure to get nominated for his performance in “Australia.” He then plunged into a comic song-and-dance number that poked fun at serious movies that were nominated for best picture, including “Milk” and “Frost/Nixon,” and less serious movies that were not, including “The Dark Knight.”
      • An early appearance by the screenwriting winners helped give the evening a story line of its own: the awards categories were arranged in blocks intended to reflect the process of building a film, beginning, in the first segment, with a blinking cursor tapping out the beginning of a script on a blank screen.
      • In another departure, the celebrity presenters were not identified in advance, partly in the hope that a larger-than-usual audience would tune in to see who actually showed up.
      • Last year’s broadcast, with the smallest domestic audience in the ceremony’s history, had only about 32 million viewers in the United States.
      • The show’s stage sets, overseen by the New York architect David Rockwell, were bathed much of the time in blue and included a vast crystal curtain. And the show was punctuated by deliberate references to movies that had played well with ticket-buying audiences last year but were often not in the running for awards, the nominations for which went overwhelmingly to relatively little-seen movies.
      • To some extent, the show’s elements collided with themselves, as songs, cinematic retrospectives and actor after actor working Hollywood in-jokes crowded the screen. One sequence, directed by Bennett Miller, of “Capote,” was squeezed out altogether but was shown to the in-theater audience during a commercial break.
      • In keeping with the self-referential tone of the night, the best live action short was teed up with a live action short from Judd Apatow, with Seth Rogen and James Franco, in character from their “Pineapple Express” film, in starring roles.
    • SUMMARY
      • The Oscar awarding winning movie called “Slumdog Millionaire” is liked by people all around the world. Mr. Boyle, 52 has been known for putting an inspirational twist on often dark and sophisticated movies. The many prizes for “Slumdog Millionaire” — whose writer, Simon Beaufoy, was honored for best adapted screenplay, among others prizes for the best picture award was a first for Fox Searchlight, which distributed “Slumdog Millionaire” in the United States.
      • Since “Slumdog Millionaire is an Indian movie it is very surprising that it would get an Oscar. People were waiting for this day where people all over the globe can be a part of a whole society. Hollywood has been taking on more and more of a global tilt with each passing year, but on this evening it was especially evident in the show and in the awards themselves. “We are all mixed together, and it has to be reflected in the cinema,” Penélope Cruz said.
      • People in India were cheering with joy since this was the first movie that an Indian star got a Oscar. The Oscars is a show that is watched around all over the country.
      • The supporting actress award, the night’s first, was presented by no less than five past winners of the prize, Whoopi Goldberg, Tilda Swinton, Eva Marie Saint, Goldie Hawn and Anjelica Huston. The heavy show of star power was meant to make good on a promise that the broadcast would deliver entertainment value that reached far beyond that offered by the nominees.
      • Mr. Beaufoy, whose “Slumdog” screenplay was based on a novel by Vikas Swarup, rattled off a list of places he never expected to be — “the moon, the South Pole, the Miss World podium and here” — as he accepted that award for his work on a film that captured many of the movie industry’s pre-Oscar honors and was widely viewed as a preordained winner of the evening’s final award, for best picture.
    • EXPLANATION
      • I've chosen the article “ A ‘Slumdog’ Kind of Night at the Oscar Ceremony ” as my most astonishing article because at the Oscars show it was pretty surprising that the move “Slumdog Millionaire” got an award. People weren't expecting a Indian movie to win the Oscars. This article was pretty astonishing to people in India. They were waiting that one day a Indian person would win the Oscars. I, myself were one of those people. “Slumdog Millionaire” was a big movie hit to the people who watched it in America, India and in other countries. When this movie and other people that helped in making the movie got a award the people in India were cheering with joy. This was a moment that everyone knew that not only America can be successful.
    • PARTS OF THE PROJECT
      • My favorite part of this project was able to learn more things that are going around in the world my reading articles in the newspaper. I think I advanced my skill as a reader, writer, and thinker. Even though this isn't English all these skills fit into each subject in their own way.
      • My least favorite part of this project was writing all the summaries. It was pretty stressful but if you budgeted your time wisely its not that hard and its simple. Also, my least favorite part was trying to find articles that fit into your category, the ones you make up. Making up your own category was pretty difficult.
      • Overall this project has been a excellent way to connect with the people that don’t like to read much, they should of learned something from this project.
    • BIBLIOGRAPHY
      • Most Memorable- http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/05/us/politics/05campaign.html?_r=1&scp=5&sq=November%204,2008&st=cse
      • Most Amazing/Outrageous
      • http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-05-26-komodo-dragon_N.htm
      • Most Heroic-
      • http://www.newsday.com/news/local/newyork/ny-lipilo0116,0,1968474.story
      • Most Controversial-
      • http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/18/health/18stem.html
      • Most Illness Issue-
      • http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-lt-swine-flu-mexico,0,1748120.story
      • Most Astonishing-
      • http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/23/movies/awardsseason/23oscar.html