• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
RaZ essayframe
 

RaZ essayframe

on

  • 1,926 views

A model of essay planning and revising

A model of essay planning and revising

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,926
Views on SlideShare
1,926
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    RaZ essayframe RaZ essayframe Presentation Transcript

    • The Five-Paragraph Essay A Framework for Expository Writing Based on the ideas of Paula Barnard
    • The Five-Paragraph Essay A Framework for Expository Writing Essay and Slides: Sheri Edwards
      • We write for fun. We write letters, stories, jokes, and to share information with our family or friends.
      • Most school writing, however, is expository writing and fits into a different category.
      Different Kinds of Writing
    • Goals
      • Writing Process:
        • Prewriting Ideas and details
        • Drafting in paragraphs with topic sentences, main ideas, details, concluding sentences
        • Revise (see traits below)
        • Edit
        • Strategies (prewrite, color code, re-read several times for different reasons)
      • Writing Traits:
        • Ideas -- elaboration
        • Word choice -- nouns, verbs, transitions
        • Organization -- ideas ordered (color code, number), transitions
    • Expository Writing
      • Gives information about a topic
      • Explains ideas
      • Gives directions
      • Shows how to do something
      The purpose of most expository writing is to communicate ideas or answer questions.
    • Expository Writing Uses Transitions
      • Writer’s Express says:
      • “ Expository writing uses transition words (such as first, second, and most importantly). These words help guide the reader through the explanation.” See:
      • Page 324 in your yellow Ginn English text.
      • Page 106 in WS 2000
      • Pages 472-473 in blue WS
      • Writer’s Express - A Handbook for Young Writers, Thinkers, and Learners ©1995
    • Transitions
      • Page 324 in your yellow Ginn English text.
      • Page 106 in WS 2000
      • Pages 472-473 in blue WS
      • Links:
        • http://www.writinghelp-central.com/article-transition-words.html
        • http://www.bookrags.com/articles/11.html
        • http://www.union.k12.sc.us/ems/Teachers--ELA--Writing%20Transition%20Words.htm
    • So, your teacher gives you a prompt and tells you to write an expository essay:
      • What do you do???
      • Don’t panic.
      • Follow this plan…
      • (Watch for the color-coding, it will help you organize your ideas.)
      “ Write about your friend. What makes your friend special?”
    • It’s Easy! You ONLY Need Three Ideas... Start with your main idea or topic. (use key words from the prompt)
      • Three reasons that show your topic sentence is true
      • And three examples for each of your reasons (Remember to show , not tell.)
      • That’s all you need for the start of a great essay!!!
    • Use Correct Paragraph Form
      • Topic Sentence
      • Three Examples
        • A detail or reason for each example
      • Conclusion or use transitions
      No paragraph should be less than eight sentences. Each paragraph must include:
      • Start with a topic sentence that uses the key words from the prompt. Then write three reasons that prove the topic sentence is true.
      • My friend, Raz, makes life fun . He is funny and easy to share with. Loyalty is important to him. He always keeps his word.
      The Beginning - Your First Sentences
    • Now end with a conclusion:
      • Remember, each paragraph may have a concluding sentence, such as “ My best friend is Raz.” using different words than the topic sentence ( My friend, Raz, makes life fun .)
      • “ My best friend is Raz.”
      • Raz and I chill together.
    • You already have your first paragraph done! Pretty easy, huh? To make it even easier look at this organizational plan using color-coding.
    • Paragraph 1: The Introduction
        • Introduction or Topic Sentence (Use key words from the prompt)
        • First Subtopic (A “Showing” Example)
        • Second Subtopic (A “Showing” Example)
        • Third Subtopic (A “Showing” Example)
        • Conclusion ( Restates Introduction)
    • Paragraph 1: Example
      • My friend, Raz, makes life fun . He is funny and easy to share with . Loyalty is important to him . He always keeps his word. Raz and I hang out together.
      • Restate each subtopic as the topic sentence for each of the next three paragraphs.
      • First Subtopic (Example #1)
      • “ He is funny and easy share with .” is the topic sentence you will restate for your next paragraph.
    • Paragraph 2: Example #1
          • Topic Sentence (Restates Example #1 from the Introduction “He is beautiful and easy to care for.” )
          • 3 Example Sentences ( Prove your Topic Sentence)
            • And a detail for each example.
          • Concluding Sentence (Restates Topic Sentence from Example #1)
    • Paragraph 2: First Subtopic
        • Topic Sentence (Subtopic from paragraph 1)
        • Main Idea 1 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Main Idea 2 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Main Idea 3 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Conclusion ( Restates topic statement)
      Color Code
    • Paragraph 2: Example #1
          • He is funny and easy share with . Every day he says, “What’s up?” and tells something funny. For example, once he locked his little brother outside in his underwear . He’s always teasing. Last week he moved all my books to the next locker, but he brought my first period book to class so I wouldn’t miss anything . Even though he’s funny, he always knows what’s too far, and he always knows if I’m not in the mood for silliness. If he sees sadness, he checks in with, “What’s really up, Dude?” I can share about my idiot sister wasting all the time shopping for a dress so Mom couldn’t have time for my new shoes . Funny and concerned; that’s Raz.
      • Restate the second subtopic as the topic sentence for the next paragraph.
      • Second Subtopic (Example #2)
      • “ Loyalty is important to him .” is the topic sentence you will restate for your next paragraph.
    • Paragraph 3: Example #2
      • Topic Sentence (Restate Example #2 from the Introduction “Playing with him is lots of fun.”)
      • 3 Example Sentences (Prove your Topic Sentence)
        • And a detail for each example
      • Concluding Sentence (Restates Topic Sentence from Example #2 -- transition in next paragraph)
    • Paragraph 3: Second Subtopic
        • Topic Sentence (Subtopic from paragraph 1)
        • Main Idea 1 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Main Idea 2 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Main Idea 3 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Conclusion ( Restates topic statement)
      Color Code
    • Paragraph 3: Example #2
          • Loyalty is important to him. If he sees his friends need help, he’s there for them . For example, I left my bus pass at home and he loaned me the money so I didn’t need walk all the way home. If someone talks trash to his friends, he’s there to back us up . Once a kid called out, “#$(@” and Raz popped up from behind his locker, and grinned back, “Say it again, Sam” as the teacher walked by. Heh, heh. The kid got detention--that’s Raz. He finds a fun way to to step up. He and I were to see the Mariners play, but I got the flu; he stayed home and we wrecked bad on Ghost Rider. He’ll be there for you, I guarantee it.
      • Use the third subtopic (example) as the topic sentence for the next paragraph.
      • Third Subtopic (Example #3)
      • “ He always keeps his word .”
      • is the topic sentence for your next paragraph.
    • Paragraph 4: Example #3
          • Topic Sentence (Restates Example #3 from the Introduction “Romeo takes care of me.”)
          • 3 Example Sentences (That prove your Topic Sentence)
            • And a detail for each example
          • Concluding Sentence (Restates Topic Sentence from Example #3)
    • Paragraph 4: Third Subtopic
        • Topic Sentence (Subtopic from paragraph 1)
        • Main Idea 1 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Main Idea 2 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Main Idea 3 (A “Showing” Example)
          • A detail for main idea (a “Showing” Example)
        • Conclusion ( Restates topic statement)
      Color Code
    • Paragraph 4: Example #3
          • He always keeps his word. Once Raz had the opportunity to watch the Seahawks in Seattle , but he had promised me and our other friends to drive to the beach for a last blast before winter. He kept that promise. He even keeps his promise to the teachers; if he says, “Can’t I do it for homework,” he will. Once he offered to pick me up from basketball practice . After 15 minutes, I started to the bus stop. Just then he pulled up with our buddy Sam; he’d promised him we’d all trip to the mall so he was a little late. Late, but always on his word. That’s Raz.
    • Paragraph 5: Conclusion (Restates Paragraph 1: Introduction)
          • Introduction
          • First Subtopic (Example)
          • Second Subtopic (Example)
          • Third Sentence (Example)
          • Conclusion
    • Paragraph 5: Conclusion (Restates Paragraph 1: Introduction)
          • As you can see, Raz is a great friend. It’s fun to laugh and joke with him. He’ll always stick with his friends. We can all count on him to make his word true. Raz is a wonderful friend.
    • There you have it!
      • Expository writing isn’t that difficult when you have a plan . To make it even easier you may want to use a graphic organizer like the following ones to organize your thoughts.
    •  
    • Draft
      • Use your plan to write your first draft.
    • Revise
      • Check for:
      • Ideas: interesting details?
      • Organization: logical with transitions?
      • Word Choice: vivid verbs, nifty nouns, alliteration, simile, imagery, etc.
      • Sentence Fluency: short and long; different beginnings
      • Voice: details and words that create mind movies
    • RAZ: Roaring Attitude Zapper “ This must be Thursday; I could never get a hang of Thursday,” my friend Raz beamed at me as he meets me at the bus. Douglas Adams actually said that, but Raz thinks its funny. He grins at me with that crooked, silly grin that makes the sun shine brighter. He pops his hat over his long, black hair which he purposely lets fly any old way, just so his mom says, “Can’t you at least brush it back?” Nope. He’s got his own way and his own say, but Rainsford Alexander Zilothe is my best friend. My friend, Raz, makes life fun . He is funny and easy share with . You’ll see him in the halls, smiling and greeting everyone with his loud, “What’s up?” as he winds through the crowd to his next class. He never misses any one. Loyalty is important to him . He always keeps his word. Raz and I chill together with several friends every day . He’s a roaring attitude zapper.
    • Remember those mornings when everyone fusses because everyone’s late? The day just starts out wrong? My friend Raz zaps that bad attitude right away. He is funny and easy share with. Every day he says, “What’s up?” and tells something funny . For example, once he locked his little brother outside in his underwear. Of course, he let him in right away, but Raz couldn’t resist the opportunity. He’s always teasing. Last week he rammed all my books into the next locker, but he brought my first period book to class so I wouldn’t miss anything. Even though he’s funny, he always knows what’s too far, and he always knows if his friends are not in the mood for silliness. If he sees sadness, he checks in with, “What’s really up, Dude?” I can share about my idiot sister wasting all the time shopping for a dress so Mom couldn’t have time for my new shoes. Funny and concerned; that’s Raz.
    • Even though Raz stretches the funny bones, loyalty is important to him. If he sees his friends need help, he’s there for them . For example, I left my bus pass at home and he loaned me the change so I didn’t need hoof-it all the way home. If someone talks trash to his friends, he’s there to back us up . Once a new kid yelled , “#$(@” and Raz popped up from behind his locker, and grinned back, “Say it again, Sam” as the teacher walked by monitoring the halls . Heh, heh. The kid spent after school in detention--that’s Raz. He finds a fun way to to step up. He and I once received tickets to watch the Mariners play, but I flopped out with the flu ; he stayed home and we wrecked totally all day on Internet Ghost Rider. Once again, he zapped the attitude, making the bad good. He’ll be there for you, I guarantee it.
    • Finally, Raz always keeps his word. Once Raz had the opportunity to watch the Seahawks in Seattle, but he had promised his friends, including me, to drive to the beach for a last blast before winter. The sun still beat down at a blazing eighty degrees; we really dreamed of a dive in the cool water. He kept that promise, and we enjoyed a great late September beach day. He even keeps his promise to the teachers ; if he says, “Can’t I do it for homework?” He will . Once he offered to pick me up from basketball practice . After 15 minutes of waiting , I tromped off to the bus stop. Just then Raz, the zapper, pulled up with our buddy Sam; he’d promised him we’d all trip to the mall, making it to me a little late . Late, but always on his word. That’s Raz.
    • Even if it is Thursday, count on Raz to jazz up the day. It’s fun to laugh and joke with him. “Zip up that frown,” he’ll jab at you and knock off your hat. But then, he’ll check out what’s wrong, and always , always, stick with his friends. We can all count on him to make his word true. C. S. Lewis once said, “Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: "What! You, too? Thought I was the only one." That’s something Raz might say on your bad day, just so you don’t feel all alone. Raz is a fantastic friend that way. Don’t you wish you had a friend like that?
    • Edit
      • Finally: edit your work for:
      • Capitals
      • Spelling
      • Punctuation
      • Grammar
      • Missing words/letters
    • Goals: How well did you:
      • Writing Process:
        • 4 3 2 1 Prewrite for Ideas and details?
        • 4 3 2 1 Draft in paragraphs with topic sentences, main ideas, details, concluding sentences
        • 4 3 2 1 Revise (see traits below)?
        • 4 3 2 1 Edit?
        • 4 3 2 1 Use Strategies (prewrite, color code, re-read several times for different reasons)
      • Writing Traits:
        • 4 3 2 1 Ideas -- elaborate with more detail, examples?
        • 4 3 2 1 Word choice -- add/substitute nouns, verbs, transitions?
        • 4 3 2 1 Organization -- ideas ordered (color code, number), transitions (move, remove)
    • Have fun with your writing & remember, you only need THREE IDEAS for a great expository essay!