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Age of Jackson

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Age of Jackson PowerPoint. Chapter 12!

Age of Jackson PowerPoint. Chapter 12!

Published in: Education

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  • 1. The Jacksonia Era CPS Cranston Public Schools
  • 2. Essential Question
    • Why is 1824-1840 known as the Jacksonian Era?
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5. 1824
  • 6. 1828
  • 7. Election 1824
    • John Q. Adams - North
    • William Crawford -South
    • Henry Clay -West
    • Andrew Jackson -West
  • 8. Deal of 1824
    • no clear winner even though Jackson had more popular votes
    • Election sent to House of Representatives
    • Clay becomes Secretary of State
    • Adams becomes president
  • 9. Election 1828
    • Jackson runs for President as a Democrat
    • New voters in many states
    • Law allowed all white males to vote
  • 10. Election 1828
    • Adams runs for reelection
    • Jackson wins big
    • The West has become a political part of U.S.
  • 11. 1828
  • 12. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 1. Jackson was a lawyer and landowner; later he was elected to Congress. He was a war hero.
  • 13. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 2. Jackson appointed many ordinary citizens (his own supporters) to government post.
  • 14. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 3. Jackson thought it was undemocratic and too powerful.
  • 15. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 4. The National Bank controlled loans made by state banks; it could limit the amount these banks could lend.
  • 16. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 4. The National Bank could limit what state banks could lend.
  • 17. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 5. Clay and Webster persuaded its president to apply early for renewal of its charter so that the bank would be an issue in the 1832 election. Clay and Webster believed if Jackson blocked the renewal, he would lose the election.
  • 18. Chapter 12-2 Reading Review
    • 6. Jackson vetoed the banks request for charter renewal. After Jackson won the election, he stopped depositing federal money in the bank. The bank closed In 1836.
  • 19. Chapter 12-3 Reading Review Questions
    • 1. The tariff raised the prices on the goods they imported; southerners thought it was unconstitutional.
  • 20. Chapter 12-3 Reading Review Questions
    • 2. If states had the rights to cancel federal laws, the nation would fall apart.
  • 21. Chapter 12-3 Reading Review Questions
    • 3. Move west of the Mississippi River to barren lands.
  • 22. Chapter 12-3 Reading Review Questions
    • 4. Loans state banks made to land speculators, the printing of money by state banks, the closing of banks, and the lowering of cotton prices because of a surplus crop.
  • 23. Chapter 12-3 Reading Review Questions
    • 5.Tried to stabilize the banking system and cut back on federal expenses.
  • 24. Chapter 12-3 Reading Review Questions
    • 6. Candidates’ traveling and giving speeches, rallies, banquets, entertainment, and mudslinging.