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The Alaska Distance Learning Network:  Moodle for Small Business <ul><li>Outcomes & Lessons for Workforce Development </li...
Project Proposal <ul><li>Goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>workforce training via distance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Meeting...
Vision of America’s E-Learning Future <ul><li>“ ...a future in which e-learning allows learning to become a continuous pro...
Target Learners <ul><li>Target learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Health care providers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trainers  -...
Results of Investment <ul><li>Learning management system (LMS) implemented for registrar functions & student interface  </...
Distance Learning in Rural Alaska:  a Good Fit? <ul><li>PRO </li></ul><ul><li>Highly desired by villages, providers, & tri...
Seven Lessons Learned <ul><li>Many skills/experienced professionals of diverse backgrounds are required </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Lessons Learned -2- <ul><li>Learning curve is extensive; result is a major advantage in terms of knowledge & skills  </li>...
Lessons Learned -3- <ul><li>In-kind support represents the major $ investment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><...
Lessons Learned -4- <ul><li>Once developed, the learning network (DLN) provides infinite capacity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nu...
Student Perceptions of  Advantages of Distance Learning <ul><li>What Went Well </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to explore in...
Instructor Perceptions of Advantages of Distance Learning <ul><li>Ability to check progress of all students, all the time ...
Project Conclusions <ul><ul><li>Most suggestive predictor of success in Session II </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>adequate...
Requirements <ul><li>Sustainable funding & resources </li></ul><ul><li>Adult learning tenets in place </li></ul><ul><ul><l...
Successful Distance Learning -1- <ul><li>Support   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical, software, design, business administrat...
Successful Distance Learning -2- <ul><li>Support   </li></ul><ul><li>Selection of people & technology </li></ul><ul><li>St...
Lesson for the Future <ul><li>If you want a quality product, leave nothing to chance! </li></ul>
Where Are We Today? <ul><li>Sustained Development of Content & Delivery </li></ul>Applications - Workforce development Beh...
More Information <ul><li>Mary M. Rydesky  [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Abbreviations used herein: </li></ul><ul><ul><...
Conversations & Questions <ul><li>Participants….what have you observed? How are our experiences similar? In what ways do t...
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The Alaska Distance Learning Network: Moodle for Small Business

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Presentation for Oklahoma Moodle Moot June 2010 on the Alaska Distance Learning Network Experience - Small Business Uses - by Mary M Rydesky

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  • Recognize Dorothy Hight, FNP &amp; Kas Healy, ANP for their contributions to this presentation and to this project
  • Describe the role CHAP Village based primary care provider who links to midlevels and physicians in centers CHAs are from the community CHAS may work in a community of 30 or 125 people- communities too small to attract midlevels and physicians are often of the family in that community cultural understanding but challenging to become the provider in place of a sister, a daughter, an untie By working in partnership, several organizations created a project to decrease delays in training and increase retention of CHAs through decreasing elements such as willingness to leave the village for training programs a month at a time. We had a series of three grants with the following results
  • Describe the role CHAP Village based primary care provider who links to midlevels and physicians in centers CHAs are from the community CHAS may work in a community of 30 or 125 people- communities too small to attract midlevels and physicians are often of the family in that community cultural understanding but challenging to become the provider in place of a sister, a daughter, an untie By working in partnership, several organizations created a project to decrease delays in training and increase retention of CHAs through decreasing elements such as willingness to leave the village for training programs a month at a time. We had a series of three grants with the following results
  • We had some tangible results - specifically, building the infrastructure and systems to support distance learning Courses were developed and offered multiple times, creating a learning curve for the team while increasing the number of graduates for the Anchorage CHAP Training Center Recognition was earned at both the state and national levels for the impact. A less tangible but not less valued element of ROI was the know how, or what is called ‘knowledge management’ today. This is the part that is easily sabotaged by turnover, under-funding, or erroneous belief that any one can do it…tomorrow
  • One of the challenges we faced was the debate of the value. Could we assist in the transformation of a community member known as daughter, sister, cousin to trusted health care provider who keeps confidences, provides correct treatment, and survives when a patient does not improve, or when there is a death! And could we teach more than the didactic material? Could a distance trained student start an IV, compute infant growth metrics, complete an H&amp;P? And in our case, could the CHA use the manual (CHAM) accurately, a skill necessary as the CHAM defines scope and provides the key to malpractice protection? On the plus side, we found And on the negative, there were concerns.
  • For the remainder of our review, I will focus on what we learned in putting together pathways training from scratch. One exception: we had a SME and a curriculum with objectives that is reviewed, revised, and passed through a statewide certification board for the CHA program. That part was not from scratch, but its existence was both valuable and painful…. If you want to engage in a new way of delivering learning, know that one person’s skill set is insufficient. You need a team whose expertise spans….
  • Secondly, it takes time and focus. Yes, you get faster at the development as the team gels, but creating the system is akin to developing a new business or a new product: there is research, marketing, evaluation, revision, governance, policy setting, pricing, and on…. Third, distance learning is tool box rather than a tool. When you become enamored of one program or one way of doing things, then that old statement “when you have only a hammer every thing looks like a nail” takes hold. Our best tip for focusing on quality measures in creating distance learning is to match to tool to the learning objective. So that means you need to know something about instructional design and adult learning - enough to ask the questions! There is a corollary to these lessons: no matter what, development will consume more time and energy than you will feel comfortable stating in a budget or project plan.
  • On the management side of the project, from the very beginning we focused on sustainability. The grants represented an R&amp;D investment - but how would we go forward? We also found that in-kind support added more than the grant dollars and were harder to account for. AS a result, funders think that building such a system costs less than it does. So that leads to a warming about undercapitalization.While you will have project deadlines for moving from development to delivery, you may encounter the need to start a semester later than originally planned. This is not about achieving perfection but it is worth the wait to develop distance learning structures that are both easy to navigate and complex enough to engage the learner.
  • Having said all that, let’s look at the plus side of the equation.
  • Transcript of "The Alaska Distance Learning Network: Moodle for Small Business"

    1. 1. The Alaska Distance Learning Network: Moodle for Small Business <ul><li>Outcomes & Lessons for Workforce Development </li></ul><ul><li>Mary M. Rydesky </li></ul><ul><li>© 2010 </li></ul>
    2. 2. Project Proposal <ul><li>Goal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>workforce training via distance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Meeting expressed learning objectives </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Attitudinal goal of socializing students into business roles - imperative </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Honoring the learners’ culture & ways of learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the unspoken goal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prove it could be done </li></ul></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Vision of America’s E-Learning Future <ul><li>“ ...a future in which e-learning allows learning to become a continuous process of inquiry & improvement that keeps pace with the speed of change inbusiness & society. With e-learning, the learner has convenient, just-in-time access to needed knowledge & information, with small content objects assembled & delivered according to the learner’s specific needs” </li></ul><ul><li>Commission on Technology & Adult Learning, A Vision of Elearning for America’s Workforce </li></ul>
    4. 4. Target Learners <ul><li>Target learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Health care providers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trainers - a mutual learning process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lessons & methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduced via DLN; synthesis & skills via videoconferences & clinic practice </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Results of Investment <ul><li>Learning management system (LMS) implemented for registrar functions & student interface </li></ul><ul><li>Course(s) developed & tested - multiple tools </li></ul><ul><li>“ Know How” amassed among team members </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Health care providers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology & technical/human interface </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructional design/adult learning theory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Distance learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning management & administration </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Distance Learning in Rural Alaska: a Good Fit? <ul><li>PRO </li></ul><ul><li>Highly desired by villages, providers, & tribal entities </li></ul><ul><li>Technology now available to villages </li></ul><ul><li>Resources/grants available </li></ul><ul><li>Stable curriculum & outcome standards for learners </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitive to village/ clinic/family demands </li></ul><ul><li>CON </li></ul><ul><li>Few instructors with distance learning experience </li></ul><ul><li>Skepticism about village connectivity, student abilities, ongoing support, time/resources available </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of change in already successful program </li></ul><ul><li>“ It can’t be done…” </li></ul>
    7. 7. Seven Lessons Learned <ul><li>Many skills/experienced professionals of diverse backgrounds are required </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative (graphic design, html proficiency) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management (services & products, health care administration) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Content specialist (experience & credentials) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adult learning (educator/trainer & instructional design proficiency) </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Lessons Learned -2- <ul><li>Learning curve is extensive; result is a major advantage in terms of knowledge & skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cannot be quickly replicated from scratch </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Distance learning = many tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not just a website or videoconferencing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not just audio or video or webinar conferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mix = correct tool to meet the learning objective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redundancy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content development timelines exceed best expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Projected 83 hours per hour of content delivery - that was low! </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Lessons Learned -3- <ul><li>In-kind support represents the major $ investment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Under-capitalization risks growth </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Too few $, too few hours = product that does not meet customer satisfaction </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Lessons Learned -4- <ul><li>Once developed, the learning network (DLN) provides infinite capacity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Numerous partners, sites, target groups possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communities of Interest & virtual meeting sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compliance courses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialty courses (customized to organization) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuing education courses with credit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HR, compliance, soft-skill oriented courses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Registrar services </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Student Perceptions of Advantages of Distance Learning <ul><li>What Went Well </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to explore information in more depth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sense of group camaraderie </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong ties created with coworkers & supervisors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No travel & compressed learning time (less stress) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Varied with the learner & site - no trends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunity to train in flexibility </li></ul></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Instructor Perceptions of Advantages of Distance Learning <ul><li>Ability to check progress of all students, all the time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Content access - frequency & length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assignments & quiz results </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email ‘alerts’ of submitted items helpful </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constant interaction via multiple methods/media </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enhances assessment of knowledge of shy, introverted, or “quiet” students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Equality when culture discourages perception of promoting self-importance </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Project Conclusions <ul><ul><li>Most suggestive predictor of success in Session II </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>adequate amount of supervised practice between sessions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>True for both classroom & distance trained students </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition, practice, & feedback were critical to both skills & confidence building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Distance learning equally successful to traditional classroom training in preparing staff for village-based businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time & expenses of development are sizeable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficiencies realized from auto-grading, electronic record keeping, & alerts when assignments arrived </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Requirements <ul><li>Sustainable funding & resources </li></ul><ul><li>Adult learning tenets in place </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Coordination with the training structure & process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Core team dedicated to creating, revising, & presenting via distance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Experienced & trained in distance learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Onsite mentorship for skills development & oversight </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluation process & tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Continually meet program standards </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Specific to distance delivery methods </li></ul></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Successful Distance Learning -1- <ul><li>Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical, software, design, business administration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Both at training source & field/village location </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Selection of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students, instructors, facilitators, mentors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Correct technology for each learning objective </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Structure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Course & class design, syllabus, lessons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning management system, connectivity </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Successful Distance Learning -2- <ul><li>Support </li></ul><ul><li>Selection of people & technology </li></ul><ul><li>Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Supervision </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Skills practice in village, online, & videoconferences </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than money - commitment to change & delayed ROI </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Lesson for the Future <ul><li>If you want a quality product, leave nothing to chance! </li></ul>
    18. 18. Where Are We Today? <ul><li>Sustained Development of Content & Delivery </li></ul>Applications - Workforce development Behavioral health Dental health CME Applications - Patients Wellness Health issues CoI or CoP circles Applications - Healthy socialization New writers circle Virtual book club Social networking Applications - Workforce support Task Force on EHR Leadership development Small business skills Non-profit agencies HR for decentralized firms Applications - Community Home school(s) Beneficiary training Applications – Distance Learner/ Trainer Skills
    19. 19. More Information <ul><li>Mary M. Rydesky [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Abbreviations used herein: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DLN Distance Learning Network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LMS Learning Management System </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moodle Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ROI Return on Investment </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Conversations & Questions <ul><li>Participants….what have you observed? How are our experiences similar? In what ways do they complement one another? </li></ul><ul><li>Queries? </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas for next steps? </li></ul>

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