Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Functions
Functions
Functions
Functions
Functions
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Functions

751

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
751
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. Journalism What’s Your Function? Media forms, and journalism in particular, serve a variety of purposes for a community. As both a potential journalist and a media “consumer,” it is important to recognize these “functions.” July 10 Media Literacy 1
  2. Journalism Values and Functions • News values identify what makes a story “newsworthy,” what makes the story “valuable” to a reader. • Journalistic functions identify what the story is doing for the reader. • Values describe a quality; functions describe an action. • Just as stories can exhibit more than one value, a story can also fulfill more than one function. July 10 Media Literacy 2
  3. Journalism A Journalist’s Functions •Political Function: Act as a watchdog of government. Provide information on which the audience can base political decisions. Cover all government activities: defend public access, investigate wrongdoing, and evaluate budgets and programs. (Ex: Woodward and Bernstein, Watergate) •Record-keeping Function: Maintain an accurate record of local, national, and world news (Ex: weather, obituaries, voting records of Congress). Ferguson, Donald L. and Jim Patten. Journalism Today! National Textbook Company: Lincolnwood, IL 1986. July 10 Media Literacy 3
  4. Journalism A Journalist’s Functions •Sentry Function: Look ahead to what is coming. Monitor trends and directions to make the audience aware. (Ex: Fall fashion) •Entertainment Function: Provide diversion as well as information; address a variety of ages and interests. (Ex: stories about famous people, comic strips, advice columns) •Social Function: Help society maintain relationships at a variety of levels by communicating daily life events and concerns. (Ex: Community calendar, school board meeting notes). Ferguson, Donald L. and Jim Patten. Journalism Today! National Textbook Company: Lincolnwood, IL 1986. July 10 Media Literacy 4
  5. Journalism A Journalist’s Functions •Economic Function: Provide information on products, goods, services, and events through news and advertising. (Ex: movie reviews, cell phone comparison) •Marketplace Function: Be a forum for a variety of ideas, concepts, and products, a place where the concerns and interests of the audience are displayed, investigated, and reflected upon. (Ex: classified ads, collection of letters to the editor) NOTE: this is different from the economic function. The press should act as a voice/outlet for its audience and should reflect audience interests. Ferguson, Donald L. and Jim Patten. Journalism Today! National Textbook Company: Lincolnwood, IL 1986. July 10 Media Literacy 5

×