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Customer Effort Score 2011
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Customer Effort Score 2011

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During "Ask Frank" session in March 2011, I had an opportunity to forward this suggestion to Frank Techar, President and CEO of P&C Banking at BMO. He liked the different viewpoints and ...

During "Ask Frank" session in March 2011, I had an opportunity to forward this suggestion to Frank Techar, President and CEO of P&C Banking at BMO. He liked the different viewpoints and he sent the following reply, “Dan, thanks for following up with me. I did have an opportunity to review the information that you shared with me on the customer effort score. It’s another interesting perspective on measuring customer loyalty and I think we can learn from all of the various approaches to determine what is best for BMO. Our Chief Marketing Officer Doug Stotz and his team are currently leading a review across the bank to identify effective customer loyalty measurement systems for each of our lines of business. After 5 years under the current system, we are doing a full review to determine if we need to refresh our approach and I’ve passed your information along to him. Thank you for being passionate about our goal to be number one in customer loyalty.”

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  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011 Dixon says, “A finding this powerful-that customer effort is elaborately linked to loyalty-really forced us to think critically about where and why customer effort exists and what customer service organizations can do to reduce or eliminate it,"
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011
  • December 20, 2011

Customer Effort Score 2011 Customer Effort Score 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • CUSTOMER EFFORT SCORE A Loyalty Predictor for Customer Service Interaction Created & Narrated By: Mrudang (Dan) Mehta March 2011
  • What is Customer Effort Score?
  • What is Customer Effort Score (C.E.S.) ?
    • C.E.S. is a loyalty predictor for customer service interactions and was introduced by the Corporate Executive Board (C.E.B.)
    • 89% of customer service executives believe that “delighting customers” will increase loyalty.
    • C.E.B.’s alarming truth is “ exceeding customer expectations results in virtually no loyalty gains”.
  • What is Customer Effort Score (C.E.S.) ?
    • The C.E.S. is based on a single question that determines the degree of required customer effort during a service request.
  • What is Customer Effort Score (C.E.S.) ?
    • Dixon states that, “A finding this powerful--that customer effort is linked to loyalty--really forced us to think critically about where and why customer effort exists and what customer service organizations can do to reduce or eliminate it.”
  • C.E.S. vs N.P.S. C.E.S. N.P.S. Focuses on efforts made by customers to resolve issues. Focuses on delighting customers by exceeding service expectations. The focus is on finding why customers’ efforts exist. Company focuses on satisfactory solutions to customer service issues. The focus is on improving procedures and company policies , which helps customers to reduce or eliminate their efforts. Focuses on effective service request handling and speedy transactions to improve high calls per hour.
  • Obstacles faced by customers
    • 56% reported having to re-explain an issue
    • 57% reported having to switch from the web to the phone
    •  
    • 59% reported moderate-to-high efforts to resolve an issue
    •  
    • 59% reported calls being transferred
    •  
    • 62% reported having to repeatedly contact the company to resolve an issue
  • The Bad-Service Ripple Effect
  • What can we do to improve positive service experience and interactions?
  • Tactics to Implement Customer Effort Score
  • Resolving issues downstream
    • Don’t just solve the current issue
    • Anticipate and address issues before they arise
    • A high percentage of call-backs were related to issues that arose in the first call but were not addressed.
  • Addressing the emotional side
    • Common strategies is to divide callers into personality types and address each inquiry in a specific manner:
    • Controller
    • Thinker
    • Filler
    • Entertainer
  • Minimizing channel switching and increasing channel ‘stickiness’
    • Don’t make customers switch channels. Instead resolve their problems within each channel.
    • Make it easy for customers to go to their preferred channel (some prefer to pick up the phone, others would like to use internet or IVR).
    • 57% of in-bound calls came were from customers who used the website first.
  • Use feedback
    • Calling unsatisfied customers and asking them what went wrong and ensuring the problem is resolved.
    • Examples:
      • National Australia Group's approach
      • EarthLink’s approach
  • Empowering C.C.A.s Incentive systems rewarding speed does not encourage agents to solve problems - instead it pushes them to move to the next call. Encouraging C.C.A.s to perform their best across the board – not just focusing on one Key Performance Indicator (K.P.I.) (i.e. M.B.I.) MBI Other Sales Calls per hour
  • Our Goal
  • Questions? Have any questions or comments? Please contact me at [email_address] Reference: Dixon, M., Freeman, K., and Toman, N. (2010). “Stop Trying to Delight Your Customers,” Harvard Business Review , July–August.