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En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation
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En 11 poetry 3 tone presentation

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  • 1. Tone
  • 2. abrupt, animated, ambivalent, apathetic, arch, accusatory, amused, absurd, aggressive, acerbic, angry, abstruse, assertive, aggrieved, arrogant, awestruck, accusatory, admiring, ardent, acerbic, befuddled, benevolent, bitter, belligerent, compliant, cautionary, condescending, callous, cynical, colloquial, comic, confused, critical, compassionate, complaining, chatty, complex, cheerful, contemptuous, contemplative, caustic, cruel, celebratory, candid, conciliatory, dandyish, detached, depressed, disapproval, docile, evasive, docile, derisive, didactic, dignified, disparaging, distressed, disheartened, diplomatic, defiant, dispassionate, demeaning, excited, empathetic, egotistical, earnest, exhilarated, farcical, frustrated, forceful, formal, frank, fawning, flippant, faultfinding, frivolous, fuming, ghoulish, gloomy, grim, gullible, gentle, hard, hard-hearted, hypercritical, humble, intense, incensed, imploring, indignant, intimate, impressionable, sulking, inane, irreverent, impassioned, informative, incredulous, indifferent, impartial, imperious, ironic, jaded, joyous, laudatory, loving, lugubrious, malicious, matter-of-fact, mocking, modest, macabre, mourning, mean-spirited, naive, nasty, narcissistic, nostalgic, objective, obsequious, outraged, obsequious, optimistic, outspoken, placating, pompous, pragmatic, pretentious, prayerful, playful, pathetic, pessimistic, pensive, patronizing, philosophical, persuasive, quizzical, rakish, reflective, resentful, reverent, resigned, regretful, righteous, reticent, reflective, restrained, sarcastic, sardonic, sentimental, satirical, sympathetic, skeptical, scornful, scathing, sincere, subjective, self-pitying, sensationalistic, submissive, scorning, subjective, solemn, sorrowful, tragic, thoughtful, tolerant, unassuming, unbiased, uneasy, urbane, virtuous, vindictive, witty, world-weary, wretched, wonder, worried, whimsical
  • 3. Romeo and Juliet (1976)
  • 4. Romeo and Juliet (1996)
  • 5. Liz Lemon’s Memory
  • 6. Kelsey Winthrop’s Memory
  • 7. Theodore Roethke (1908 – 1963)
    MY PAPA’S WALTZ
     
    The whiskey on your breath
    Could make a small boy dizzy;
    But I hung on like death:
    Such waltzing was not easy.
     
    We romped until the pans
    Slid from the kitchen shelf;
    My mother's countenance
    Could not unfrown itself.
     
    The hand that held my wrist
    Was battered on one knuckle;
    At every step you missed
    My right ear scraped a buckle.
     
    You beat time on my head
    With a palm caked hard by dirt,
    Then waltzed me off to bed
    Still clinging to your shirt.
     
    (1948)
  • 8. Theodore Roethke (1908 – 1963)
    MY PAPA’S WALTZ
     
    The whiskey on your breath
    Could make a small boy dizzy;
    But I hung on like death:
    Such waltzing was not easy.
     
    We romped until the pans
    Slid from the kitchen shelf;
    My mother's countenance
    Could not unfrown itself.
     
    The hand that held my wrist
    Was battered on one knuckle;
    At every step you missed
    My right ear scraped a buckle.
     
    You beat time on my head
    With a palm caked hard by dirt,
    Then waltzed me off to bed
    Still clinging to your shirt.
     
    (1948)
    Roethke expresses his resentment for his father, a drunken brute with dirty hands and a whiskey breath who careless hurt the child’s ear and manhandled him. We are meant to sympathize with the mother, and disapprove of the father’s clumsy disordering of the kitchen. The fact that the child hangs on like death suggests that something terrible will happen if he doesn’t play along, and the use of the words beat and battered are calculated to bring to mind images of physical abuse.
    The rollicking rhythms of the poem, the playfulness of a rime like dizzy with easy, the joyful suggestions of the words, waltzing and romped, all suggest that the speaker’s attitude toward his father is affectionate, and that this is a happy memory. There is comedy in the scene with kitchen pans falling down, the mother looking disapprovingly on the side, and the father happily using his son’s head for a drum. At the end of the poem the boy is still clinging with persistent love
    Adapted from Eagleton, “How to Read a Poem”
  • 9.
  • 10. Amused
    Wrathful
    Pitying
    Solemn
    Reverent
    Laudatory
    Indifferent
    Incredulous
  • 11.
  • 12. Reading #1
    The last line is a cry of (perhaps slightly manic) triumph: the lover has deliberately tempted God by this dreadful deed into revealing himself, and God has remained silent. So perhaps the whole grisly murder was an experiment in demonstrating the truth of aetheism.
    Robert Browning (1812 – 1889)
    Excerpt from
    PORPHYRIA’S LOVER
    . . . I found
    A thing to do, and all her hair
    In one long yellow string I wound
    Three times her little throat around,
    And strangled her . . .
    And thus we sit together now,
    And all night long we have not stirred,
    And yet God has not said a word!
     
    (1836)
    Reading #3
    The last line is spoken in admiration and amazement. The line reveals that the “she” is an incarnation of God with whom the speaker sits “all night long”, not stirring. In all this time, He/She has not spoken. In other words, God is unwilling to break character, even though God could easily still “wake” up after having been strangled. The speaker is marveling at God’s steadfastness
    Reading #2
    The last line is spoken in a tone of sullen resentment. The speaker is not a jubilant atheist but a would-be believer, who has sacrificed his lover in an attempt to force God into revealing his hand, and is now bitterly downcast by the Almighty’s silence. He has, so to speak, lost his Maker and his mistress at the same time, and all for nothing.
    Adapted from Eagleton, “How to Read a Poem”

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