Changing Rights and Freedoms: Assimilation ppt

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Changing Rights and Freedoms: Assimilation ppt

  1. 1. How have the Rights and Freedoms of Aboriginal Peoplechanged in the Post-War Period?
  2. 2. Today’s Lesson1. Protectionism: Revision2. Assimilation: Introduction3. Source Analysis4. Video
  3. 3. Assimilation•The policy of assimilation was basedon the belief that the Aboriginal cultureand way of life was inferior and it tooklittle notice of the long heritage andtraditional lifestyle of the Aboriginalpeople.•The policy of assimilation encouragedmany Aboriginal people to give up thistraditional lifestyle and move to townsand cities to find work and to seek alifestyle that did not involve a protector orgovernment official making decisions for
  4. 4. How did the Assimilation Policyeffect Aboriginal Australians? The Assimilation policy denied Aboriginal people, their basic rights up until the 1960s. It prevented them from:  Marrying without permission Raising their own children  Eating in restaurants From freely moving  Entering a pub Accessing education  Swimming in a public pool Receiving award wages  or having the right to vote.
  5. 5. Source QuestionsWrite these questions in your book and answer them for each of the three sources.1. What aspect of the Assimilation policy is seen in the source?2. What do you think white Australians were hoping to achieve by enacting this aspect of the policy?3. What impact do you think it had on the Aboriginal people?
  6. 6. Assimilation: Source 1 Assimilation Video
  7. 7. Assimilation: Source 2 This photograph of Aboriginal boys on a tractor at Kinchela Boys Home in 1959 shows that they were not expected to aim higher than the work of a farm hand. (National Archives of Australia: A1200, L31986, Aboriginal boys on a tractor, Kinchela 1959)
  8. 8. Assimilation: Source 3 Aborigines of "mixed blood" to be issued with Certificates of Exemption, releasing them from the provisions of the Act and its regulations. These certificates, commonly known as "dog tags", came at a price as individuals were forced to relinquish family connections. They were not allowed to visit their own families and were gaoled if caught doing so. Mary Terszaks (nee Woods) Certificate of Exemption from the Western Australian Department of Native Affairs. She has kept it as a reminder of the past.
  9. 9. Check your understandingFill in the second summary table on Assimilation.

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