 The Election of 1800 was aptly namedthe “Revolution of 1800” because of thevast differences between the economicand poli...
 The Federalists lead by John Adams andAlexander Hamilton believed the future of thenation lay in its abundance of natura...
 The Democratic Republicans, lead byThomas Jefferson, thought the Federalistshad too much power and thegovernment was bei...
 The Federalists favored a strong centralgovernment that would run the countryefficiently and help them grow. They belie...
 They believed that the true power of thegovernment was given to the citizens andthe states They preferred small local g...
 Before the end of his term, John Adams appointeda number of Federalists judges to federal courtpositions in an effort to...
 The judiciary should be subservient to the electedbranches and the Supreme Court should not havethe power to strike down...
 Adams continued to support Washington’sneutral foreign policy stance Most Federalists favored an alliance withGreat Bri...
 Americans had a duty to spread what Jefferson called the "Empire of Liberty"to the world, but should avoid "entangling a...
 Adams had appointed hundreds of federal Judgesto the bench and left office after Jefferson won.They didn’t contest the o...
 The election of 1800 marked the first timethat power was peacefully transferred fromone political party to another The ...
Day 2 group a revolution of 1800
Day 2 group a revolution of 1800
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Day 2 group a revolution of 1800

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Day 2 group a revolution of 1800

  1. 1.  The Election of 1800 was aptly namedthe “Revolution of 1800” because of thevast differences between the economicand political ideologies of the Federalistsand Democratic-Republicans for thefuture of the young nation.
  2. 2.  The Federalists lead by John Adams andAlexander Hamilton believed the future of thenation lay in its abundance of natural resourcesand the ambitions of the people to create a richeconomy. Federalists supported growth in industry and trade. The inexpensive and rapid expansion in oceantransportation for trading. The Irish Potato Famine created a growth in cheaplabor because of the Irish Immigrants The Development of Corporations gave more laborfor the economy
  3. 3.  The Democratic Republicans, lead byThomas Jefferson, thought the Federalistshad too much power and thegovernment was being controlled by thewealthy. The Democratic-Republicans believed inprotecting the interests of the workingclasses: workers, farmers and laborers. They were against the bank and thewealthy.
  4. 4.  The Federalists favored a strong centralgovernment that would run the countryefficiently and help them grow. They believed that the states had to muchpower and the citizens were incapable ofrunning the government. The Federalists wanted to place limits onthose who wanted to become citizens andon individual’s rights to criticize thegovernment through the alien and seditionacts
  5. 5.  They believed that the true power of thegovernment was given to the citizens andthe states They preferred small local governments tothe large Federalist Government. They wanted to encourage the commonpeople to participate in the governmentand believed that many of the federalistpolicies were a threat to the rights andliberties of the people
  6. 6.  Before the end of his term, John Adams appointeda number of Federalists judges to federal courtpositions in an effort to mitigate the upcomingRepublican rule. Adams signed the judges’ commissions during hisfinal few hours in office—hence the name“midnight judges” or “midnight appointments.”
  7. 7.  The judiciary should be subservient to the electedbranches and the Supreme Court should not havethe power to strike down laws passed by Congress.The Jeffersonians lost this battle to ChiefJustice John Marshall, a Federalist, who dominatedthe Court from 1801 to his death in 1835. Marbury vs Madison- The first case of the SupremeCourt deeming an act of Congress to beUnconstitutional
  8. 8.  Adams continued to support Washington’sneutral foreign policy stance Most Federalists favored an alliance withGreat Britain
  9. 9.  Americans had a duty to spread what Jefferson called the "Empire of Liberty"to the world, but should avoid "entangling alliances." Britain was the greatest threat, especially its monarchy, aristocracy,corruption, and business methods; the Jay Treaty of 1794 was much toofavorable to Britain and thus threatened American values. Favored an alliance with France during the early stages of their revolutionbut considered Napoleon an enemy republicanism A standing army and navy are dangerous to liberty and should be avoided;much better was to use economic coercion such as the embargo such asthe Embargo Act of 1807 {Against Britain and France during the NapoleonicWars} The militia was adequate to defend the nation. But this proved wrong in theWar of 1812 when militia units refused to leave their state to attack the British. 1803 Louisiana Purchase- Jefferson purchases the Louisiana Territory fromFrance for $15 million to gain access to the Mississippi River
  10. 10.  Adams had appointed hundreds of federal Judgesto the bench and left office after Jefferson won.They didn’t contest the outcome or call the armyto keep Adams in power. Federal Legislators left office without any trouble. The Dem-Republicans set a new course for thecountry by repealing the Alien and Sedition acts Jefferson turned the efforts of the country to theWest, expanding and absorbing territories
  11. 11.  The election of 1800 marked the first timethat power was peacefully transferred fromone political party to another The Dem-Republicans reversed manyFederalist policies, but did not attempt todestroy the Federalist party. The election also proved that citizens couldsuccessfully change the course of theGovernment when they saw fit.

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