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Romeo and Juliet intro

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  • Thispowerpoint is on CHShub.com
  • It is believed that Shakespeare wrote The Tragedy of Julius Caesar in 1599He wrote it based on the events leading up to and following Caesar’s assassination
  • It was the first play to be performed at Shakespeare’stheater, the Globe
  • Is used to describe characters, create mood, or suggest an idea. Imagery is essential in Shakespearean plays because there was little visual representation.
  • Unrhymed iambic pentameterUsed to represent conversationBreaks in iambic pentameter can suggest important action
  • Each type serves a different dramatic purposeWe’ll examine each of these individually.What the characters reveal in speeches made either to themselves or directly to the audience can be dramatically different from what they say to other characters.
  • soliloquy is a speech in which a character, alone on stage, speaks directly to the audience/SELF and reveals or examines his thoughts and feelings.
  • A monologue is a lengthy, uninterrupted speech addressed to other characters, rather than to the audience. It may or may not reveal what the speaker really thinks or feels. A monologue is a lengthy, uninterrupted speech addressed to other characters, rather than to the audience. It may or may not reveal what the speaker really thinks or feels.
  • An aside is a brief remark to the audience, uttered while other characters are nearby but unable to hear. Often the character is speaking to him or herself. In Act III, however, two characters speak asides not overheard by the others, and they reveal their true feelings.
  • Dramatic Irony is a device whereby an audience’s understanding of a character’s words or actions is different from the character’s understanding. The audience’s special knowledge enables it to view the characters with superior understanding.
  • Metaphorical Language involves a comparison of unlike things
  • Transcript

    • 1. Romeo and Juliet
      Love, death, and youth
      A drama for the ages
    • 2.
    • 3. Everything you need to know before reading the play!
    • 4. WHERE DOES THIS PLAY BEGIN?
    • 5. verona
      Italy
      Play performed in 1600s
    • 6. 1599
    • 7. GLOBE THEATER
    • 8. themes
      +
      motifs
    • 9. YOUNG LOVE CAN BE IMPETIOUS AND IMPULSIVE
    • 10. LOVE CAN LEAD TO MADNESS
    • 11. THERE ARE DIFFERENT TYPES OF LOVE
    • 12. FAMILY GRUDGES CAN LEAD TO DEATH & DESTRUCTION
    • 13. YOU CAN NOT ESCAPE FATE
    • 14. MOTIF: TIME
    • 15. MOTIF: LIGHT VS DARK
    • 16. Literary terms to know
      These are in your packet
      Which is your homework tonight
      Print the Romeo and Juliet packet!
    • 17. IMAGERY
    • 18. BLANK VERSE
    • 19. DRAMATIC SPEECHES
    • 20. SOLILOQUY:is a speech to one’s self. It reveals inner dialogue of a character
    • 21. MONOLOGUE:SPEECH TO OTHERS; NOT TO SELF
    • 22. ASIDE
    • 23. DRAMATIC IRONY
      an audience’s understanding of a character’s words or actions is different from the character’s understanding. The audience’s special knowledge enables it to view the characters with superior understanding.
    • 24. Verbal Irony
      Isn’t that cute?
      You actually think I care…
    • 25. metaphor
    • 26. DIFFERENT VERSIONS
    • 27. LUHRMAN
    • 28. ZIFFERELLI
    • 29. SO GET READY…
    • 30. FOR ONE OF THE GREATEST
    • 31. TRAGEDIES OF ALL TIME
    • 32. LET’S LOOK AT THE PROLOGUE