These rules are generally followedthroughout the funding world.
   Vision for improvement (problem statement)   Plan of action (project goals and objectives)   Request for funding (bu...
   Read (and reread) the grant guidelines carefully    before beginning to write out your proposal. The    more specifica...
   Grant criteria (do you   Due date                      and your school meet the                                  requ...
   The problem statement explains the reason for your request to    the funding organization. It identifies a problem and...
   “Project Goals” are general statements of purpose for    what you are attempting to accomplish.   “Project Objectives...
Remember, funders areINVESTING in your idea!
   Your budget is one of the most important sections    of the grant.   Funders need to see that you have a specific pla...
   “In-kind” items are items that are not considered by their    cash value. The donation of time, services, facilities, ...
Show your funders that you willbe able to prove their investmentwas well spent!
   Clearly explain your evaluation methods in the    grant submission.   Include the following:    ◦ What data will you ...
Funders are usually happyto help – after all, theywant to receive the bestpossible grant that you canwrite!
   Excellence in Education (EIE)    ◦ The EIE grant is made available at the beginning of the school      year and is due...
   Students for Sustainability by Vectren    ◦ The SFS grant is made available at the beginning of the      school year a...
   Rotary/PEF/Love Foundation grants    ◦ Applications become available after winter recess, and      are due in early Fe...
   TJ Maxx Teacher Study Grants    ◦ Applications are made available the first of April, and are      due mid-to-late Apr...
   Priority is give to grants      Priority is given to    that impact a larger             projects that can be    numb...
   they ask for materials or           the grant DOES NOT    equipment not directly related       FOLLOW grant guideline...
   PEF grant recipients will receive their funds only    after signing a Grant Funds Agreement. This    Agreement ensures...
   Read the Guidelines   Follow the Directions   Proofread   Be Clear in Your Project Proposal   Be EXTRA Clear in Yo...
Tips and tricks for writing successful grant proposals (2012)
Tips and tricks for writing successful grant proposals (2012)
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Tips and tricks for writing successful grant proposals (2012)

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Tips and tricks for writing successful grant proposals (2012)

  1. 1. These rules are generally followedthroughout the funding world.
  2. 2.  Vision for improvement (problem statement) Plan of action (project goals and objectives) Request for funding (budget) Commitment (evaluation)
  3. 3.  Read (and reread) the grant guidelines carefully before beginning to write out your proposal. The more specifically your project can address the requirements of the grant, the more likely you will be to receive funding. Return to the grant guidelines throughout the writing process, and again before submission.
  4. 4.  Grant criteria (do you Due date and your school meet the requirements to be Number of pages funded?) Appendix or no appendix  Budget guidelines Number of copies for  What are the funding submission goals for the granting individual or Information required organization? What is the individual or organization’s mission?
  5. 5.  The problem statement explains the reason for your request to the funding organization. It identifies a problem and describes the ways in which you aim to address it through your project. The problem statement should prove that you have a thorough understanding of the issue, and that the issue can be improved by the implementation of your proposed plan within the time- frame of the granting organization. Helpful links and examples: ◦ http://www.policegrantshelp.com/Columnists/grants-101/articles/1887996-Building-blocks- of-your-grant-proposal-The-problem-statement/ ◦ http://www.ehow.com/how_6042320_write-problem-statement-needs-assessment.html ◦ http://www.mscd.edu/~act2/grant2/problem.html
  6. 6.  “Project Goals” are general statements of purpose for what you are attempting to accomplish. “Project Objectives” are specific and measurable, and will allow you to quantify the results of your project.YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO CLEARLY ARTICULATE THESE CONCEPTS. IF YOU CANNOT, YOUR GRANT IS UNLIKELY TO BE STRONG ENOUGH TO BE FUNDED.
  7. 7. Remember, funders areINVESTING in your idea!
  8. 8.  Your budget is one of the most important sections of the grant. Funders need to see that you have a specific plan for the entire amount of money requested, that the entire sum is necessary for meeting your project objectives, and that you will be a responsible steward of their investment.
  9. 9.  “In-kind” items are items that are not considered by their cash value. The donation of time, services, facilities, or equipment would be considered “in-kind.” “Line-item” refers to pricing each individual element of your budget. (For example, if you request money to buy science supplies for your classroom, a line-item budget would list each piece of equipment and it’s cost rather than simply saying “science supplies, $500.00.) All budgets should include in-kind items and be in line- item form, unless otherwise directed. Budgets should also include information on monies or donations coming from other sources but going to the same project.
  10. 10. Show your funders that you willbe able to prove their investmentwas well spent!
  11. 11.  Clearly explain your evaluation methods in the grant submission. Include the following: ◦ What data will you collect for study at the completion of the project? ◦ What instruments and methods will be used for analysis? ◦ Who will do the evaluation? ◦ How will you define success?
  12. 12. Funders are usually happyto help – after all, theywant to receive the bestpossible grant that you canwrite!
  13. 13.  Excellence in Education (EIE) ◦ The EIE grant is made available at the beginning of the school year and is due in mid-September. Up to $500.00 is awarded for individual grants, and up to $1,000.00 for collaborative grants (those involving multiple classrooms, grade levels, or schools). ◦ Projects are intended to be completed during the school year in which they are written. ◦ EIE grants are designed for use in classroom enrichment. An EIE application and examples of projects that PEF has funded through EIE grants in the past can be found here: http://www.pefevansville.org/grants/grants.php
  14. 14.  Students for Sustainability by Vectren ◦ The SFS grant is made available at the beginning of the school year and is due in mid-September. Up to $500.00 is awarded for individual grants, and up to $2,500.00 for collaborative grants (those involving multiple classrooms, grade levels, or schools). ◦ Projects should increase classroom learning in the fields of energy conservation and environmental stewardship. Priority will be given to projects that demonstrate the ability to sustain themselves beyond a single year.
  15. 15.  Rotary/PEF/Love Foundation grants ◦ Applications become available after winter recess, and are due in early February. Up to $750.00 is awarded for individual grants, and $2,500.00 for collaborative projects. ◦ Projects are intended to be implemented the following school year from when the grants are written. ◦ Rotary/PEF/Love Foundation grants are also intended for classroom enrichment, examples of which, along with a copy of the application, can be found here: http://www.pefevansville.org/grants/grants.php
  16. 16.  TJ Maxx Teacher Study Grants ◦ Applications are made available the first of April, and are due mid-to-late April. Teachers can be awarded up to $500.00 for professional development that will increase their knowledge base to benefit their classrooms. Teachers may also apply for funds to hold local seminars benefiting a large number of teachers. There is no limit on the amount of money that may be requested in this type of grant. ◦ Examples of TJ Maxx Grants and applications may be found here: http://www.pefevansville.org/grants/grants.php
  17. 17.  Priority is give to grants  Priority is given to that impact a larger projects that can be number of students continued in future (remember, funders are years without the need looking at return on for repeat funding. investment).  Priority is given to Priority is given to grants that are creative projects that can be in their approach to effectively evaluated at addressing the problem their completion. or situation.
  18. 18.  they ask for materials or  the grant DOES NOT equipment not directly related FOLLOW grant guidelines. to the project.  the project is one that has been they include compensation for previously funded by PEF. teachers, staff, or substitute teachers.  the grant has spelling, grammar or math errors. they ask for materials or supplies usually provided by the EVSC.
  19. 19.  PEF grant recipients will receive their funds only after signing a Grant Funds Agreement. This Agreement ensures that all parties are aware of expectations for the project and those involved with implementing it.
  20. 20.  Read the Guidelines Follow the Directions Proofread Be Clear in Your Project Proposal Be EXTRA Clear in Your Budget Explain How You Will Show Your Success Feel Comfortable Being in a Dialogue with the Funding Organization Throughout the Process

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