Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Whitney Riley-Pop Art
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Whitney Riley-Pop Art

1,062

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,062
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Pop Art 1958-1975<br />By Whitney Riley<br />
  • 2. Pop Artists <br />Peter Blake 1932-<br />Roy Licthenstein 1923-1997<br />Jim Dine 1935-<br />Andy Warhol 1928-1987<br />
  • 3. Character of the Art Movement<br />Pop Art started in London in the 1950s uses common everyday objects to portray element of culture and try to advertise it or televise it. Mainly led by LawerenceAlloway; defending Pop Art as a legitimate art form, but was carried in the Americas in the early 60s by Jim Dine, Roy Lichtenstein, and Robert Rauschenberg. Andy Warhol was the big Pop Artist in the genre, he used a photo-realistic technique that helped him with his advertising and his commentaries on fame and the media. Pop Art itself made commentary on contemporary society and culture. “It was also widely interpreted as either a reversal or reaction to Abstract Expressionism or an expansion upon it.” Pop Art was so basic that it was simple to identify, and understand it.<br />
  • 4. Peter Blake<br />On the Balcony, 1955 - 1957. Oil on canvas, by Peter Blake.<br />
  • 5. Peter Blake<br />The First Real Target, 1961. Oil on canvas and collage on board, by Peter Blake.<br />
  • 6. Roy Licthenstein<br />Hopeless
Roy Lichtenstein1963Oil on canvas<br />
  • 7. Roy Lictenstein<br />The Head (1992), Barcelona.<br />
  • 8. Jim Dine<br />&apos;The Robe Following Her # 4&apos;, oil on canvas painting by Jim Dine, 1984-5<br />
  • 9. Jim Dine<br />Jim Dine, The Crommaelynuk Gate With Tools, 1983<br />
  • 10. Andy Warhol<br />Andy Warhol, Self Portrait, 1986<br />
  • 11. Andy Warhol<br />Andy Warhol, Camouflage, 1986<br />
  • 12. Works Cited<br />http://wwar.com/masters/movements/pop_art.html<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Blake_(artist)<br />The Head (1992), Barcelona.<br />http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&client=safari&rls=en-us&resnum=0&q=Roy+Lichtenstein&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=LKvLSvmTF4KCNr3LhdAD&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Hockney<br />http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/hockney/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Dine<br />http://www.warhol.org/collections/art.html<br />

×