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Semicolons and Compound sentences
 

Semicolons and Compound sentences

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    Semicolons and Compound sentences Semicolons and Compound sentences Presentation Transcript

    • Showing Relationships: Using the Semicolon, Compound, and Complex Sentences
    • The Semicolon ; We can relate!
    • Before we talk about how to use the semicolon, we need a quick review!• What are independent clauses? – An independent clause is a full sentence: it has a subject and a predicate.
    • Can you find the subject and predicate in the following sentence?
    • The man loved his dog.
    • Predicate: The verb (action that the man is Subject: The doing) is “loved.” The man is doing the verb and everything action. after it is the predicate.The man loved his dog.
    • Keeping this in mind, let’s get to the first use of the semicolon! Semicolons are used to connect two related, independent clauses.
    • Ice cream is the best food in theworld. My favorite ice cream flavor is cookies and cream. I want to show that these two sentences are related (or, in other words, have something to do with each other…
    • Notice that the first letter after the semicolon is not capitalized! Ice cream is the best food in theworld; my favorite ice cream flavor is cookies and cream.
    • Now the reader knows that I enjoy ice cream, and what my favorite flavor is; these two ideas are related!
    • Avoid using a comma when a semicolon is needed.• Incorrect: I love cheeseburgers, however, I hate how difficult they are to eat.• Correct: I love cheeseburgers; however, I hate how difficult they are to eat.
    • These are two independent clauses. I love cheeseburgers; however, Ihate how difficult they are to eat. “However” indicates a relationship between the two independent clauses; this clear relationship requires a semicolon.
    • I hope that Ihaven’t made youtoo hungry! We stillhave more to talkabout!
    • Semicolons: The End of the Run-on Sentence!
    • If there is a great deal of internal punctuation, separate the ideas into independent clauses and use the semicolon!• Example: – When dinosaurs agree on something, they’ll often high five one another; dinosaurs are all about high fives. • (from The Oatmeal)
    • Let’s Practice!
    • Use the semicolon to combine the following sentences.• I went to the doctor. I hate getting shots.• I was good for the doctor. She gave me a lollipop.• After a long day, I will take a bubble bath. Bubble baths are a great way to relax!• I love cats. They are good companions.
    • Did you get it right?Let’s check your answers!
    • Notice that “I” is still capitalized, even though it comes after a semicolon.• I went to the doctor; I hate getting shots.• I was good for the doctor; she gave me a lollipop.• After a long day, I will take a bubble bath; bubble baths are a great way to relax!• I love cats; they are good companions. Because there is a semicolon between sentences, it is clear that “they” refers to “cats.” Semicolons help with clarity in writing!
    • Semicolons: The Super-Comma! ;
    • Semicolons separate items in list that contains commas. I travelled to New York, New York; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Portland, Oregon; and San Francisco, California.
    • Compound Sentences Bring it together!
    • A compound sentence joins tworelated sentences (or independentclauses) using a comma, and then a conjunction.
    • Conjunctions are “joining words.”• Coordinating Conjunctions (These are used to create compound sentences; they follow the comma.) • For • And • Nor • But • Or • Yet When choosing a conjunction, make sure that you • So pick one that is appropriate for the relationship between the two sentences.
    • Compound Sentences with a Comma• I love reading books, but I am usually disappointed by films based on books.
    • Compound sentences may also becreated with the use of the semicolon.
    • Compound sentences created with a semicolon are called adverbial conjunctions. They need to be used with a semicolon (;) and a comma (,). Adverbial Conjunctions ; therefore, ; consequently, ; thus, ; furthermore, ; however, ; still, ; also, ; besides, ; moreover, ; nevertheless, ; otherwise, ; then,
    • Adverbial Conjunctions and the Compound Sentence• I hate when it rains; therefore, I think that rain should be banned!
    • Let’s Practice!http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/game/en28conn-game-is-this-a-compound- sentence