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Period 7 - Lisa Liu - Superstitions
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Period 7 - Lisa Liu - Superstitions

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How superstitions affect

How superstitions affect

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  • 1. A Presentation by Lisa Liu
    SLC: Magnet
    Superstitions
  • 2. Why I Chose This Topic
    Superstitions have always fascinated me as a kid & it’s really interesting learning the different superstitions from other cultures.
    I don’t think that people really acknowledge superstitions, & many of them don’t know that most of them have deeper meanings.
    Hitchens, Andrew. “Bad Luck Illustration.” Photo. Flickr.com 23 Sept. 2010 11 Feb., 2011
  • 3. So What Exactly Are Superstitions?
    A superstition is a
    belief of the ominous
    significance of a
    particular idea or
    happening. It isnot
    really based on any
    reasoning or
    knowledge.
    Kroese, Yvonne. “Superstition.” Photo. Flickr.com 27 Feb. 2010 11 Feb. 2011
  • 4. Some examples of Superstitions
    Step on a crack, break your mother’s back!
    It’s bad luck to go under a ladder.
    If you break that mirror, you’ll get seven years of bad luck!
    Knock on wood!
    These three are just some
    examples of some familiar
    superstitions that we may
    have all heard about. Let’s
    get more in depth…
  • 5. Superstitions Vs. Culture
    Superstitions are a big part of culture. In fact, they are so important, that they actually affect cultures around the world.
    Hillewaert, Hans. “Shona Witch Doctor.” Photo. Commons.wikimedia.org Aug. 1989 11 Feb. 2011
    Unknown, Jimmie. “Burning Paper Money Fire Dying.” Photo. Flickr.com 13 Feb. 2010 11 Feb. 2011
  • 6. Around the World
    In China, it is considered bad luck if you do not finish every grain of rice in your bowl.
    In Africa, many people believe in witch doctors.
    Lighting a cigarette with a candle is looked down upon in Germany.
  • 7. In Asian cultures, children are taught to finish every grain of rice in his or her bowl or else they will get bad luck.
    In the Philippines, it is bad luck if one person at the dinner table leaves before everyone else is finished.
    Superstitions could be used as a good way of teaching younger children lessons or morals.
  • 8. Just some facts
    In August 2003, Sichuan
    Airlines paid 2.33 million
    yuan(280,000 dollars) for
    the telephone number
    (considered particularly
    lucky because it has eight
    8s) at an auction of lucky
    phone numbers. (Vital
    Statistics)
    August 8, 2008, at 8 p.m.
    That was the date that the Beijing Olympics were to begin.
    Jackson, Kevin. “Unknown.” Photo. Flickr.com 8 Mar. 2007 11 Feb. 2011
  • 9. Temporary Slide
    QWERTYUIOP
    I RAN OUT OF IDEAS.
    Butsomething will pop up in my head soon.
    Yup.
    Kbye.
  • 10. Works Cited
    Vital Statistics: More Information. Web. 11 Feb. 2011. <http://www.vitalstatistics.info/sub-category2.asp?cid=4&scid=1317>.
     Superstitions around the World. Web. 11 Feb. 2011. <http://worldsuperstitions.blogspot.com/>.