Splash Screen
Contents Chapter Introduction Section 1 The New Frontier Section 2 JFK and the Cold War  Section 3 The Great Society Chapt...
Intro 1 Click the Speaker button  to listen to the audio again.
Intro 2 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives <ul><li>Summarize Ke...
Intro 3 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 2: JFK and t...
Intro 4 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 3: The Great...
Intro 7 Why It Matters President John F. Kennedy urged Americans to work for progress and to stand firm against the Soviet...
Intro 8 The Impact Today Initiatives introduced in this era remain a part of American society.  <ul><li>Medicaid and Medic...
Intro 9 continued  on next slide
Intro 10
End of Intro
Section 1-1 Guide to Reading John F. Kennedy encountered both success and setbacks on the domestic front.  <ul><li>missile...
Section 1-2 Guide to Reading  (cont.) Reading Strategy Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the infor...
Section 1-3 Guide to Reading  (cont.) Section Theme Civic Rights and Responsibilities   The Supreme Court made decisions t...
Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button  to listen to the audio again.
Section 1-5 The Election of 1960 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The 19...
Section 1-6 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Click the mouse button or press the...
Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Nixon believed the Republic...
Section 1-8 How did Kennedy and Nixon stand on the two main issues of the 1960 presidential election? The campaign centere...
Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. The Kennedy Mystique <ul><li>John K...
Section 1-13 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. The Kennedy Mystique   (cont.) What was...
Section 1-14 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domesti...
Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domesti...
Section 1-16 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domesti...
Section 1-16 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domesti...
Section 1-17 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Success and Setback on the Domestic Fro...
Section 1-18 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Warren Court Reforms <ul><li>Socia...
Section 1-19 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Many of these decisions ar...
Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During the 1960s, the U.S....
Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The issue of separation be...
Section 1-21 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Why was the decision of the Warren Cour...
Section 1-23 Checking for Understanding __ 1. belief that the Soviet Union had more nuclear weapons than the United States...
Section 1-24 Checking for Understanding  (cont.) Summarize  the progress made for women’s rights during Kennedy’s administ...
Section 1-25 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Civic Rights and Respo...
Section 1-26 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting   In wha...
Section 1-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Charts  Stu...
Section 1-29 Close Explain why Congress often did not support Kennedy’s proposals.
End of Section 1
Section 2-1 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading As president, John...
Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading  (cont.) Reading S...
Section 2-3 Guide to Reading  (cont.) Section Theme Science and Technology  During the Cold War, the nation devoted much o...
Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button  to listen to the audio again.
Section 2-5 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges...
Section 2-6 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges...
Section 2-7 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges...
Section 2-8 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges...
Section 2-9 How did President Kennedy confront the global challenges he faced? Click the mouse button or press the  Space ...
Section 2-10 Kennedy supported a “flexible response” where he asked for a buildup of conventional troops and weapons to al...
Section 2-10 Crises of the Cold War Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Cub...
Section 2-11 <ul><li>Disaster struck as Kennedy cancelled air support for the exiles in order to keep United States involv...
Section 2-12 <ul><li>The Soviet leader retaliated by constructing a wall through Berlin, stopping movement between the Sov...
Section 2-12 <ul><li>Photographs proved that the Soviets had placed long-range missiles in Cuba.  </li></ul><ul><li>Kenned...
Section 2-12 <ul><li>The Soviets agreed to remove missiles  in Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>The Cuban missile crisis, as it bec...
Section 2-12 <ul><li>The missile crisis led to Nikita Khrushchev’s fall from power, and the new Soviet leadership was less...
Section 2-13 Why was the Bay of Pigs a dark moment for the Kennedy administration? The action revealed the American plot t...
Section 2-14 The Death of a President Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>O...
Section 2-15 <ul><li>Chief Justice Warren concluded that Oswald was the lone gunman.  </li></ul><ul><li>The report of the ...
Section 2-17 What was the result of the Warren Commission report? Chief Justice Warren concluded that Oswald was the lone ...
Section 2-19 Checking for Understanding __ 1. refers to the Cold War competition over dominance of space exploration capab...
Section 2-20 Checking for Understanding  (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Exp...
Section 2-21 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Science and Technology...
Section 2-22 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting   What w...
Section 2-24 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs...
Section 2-25 Close Explain how the Cold War influenced foreign aid and the space program.
End of Section 2
Section 3-1 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading Lyndon Johnson suc...
Section 3-2 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading  (cont.) Reading S...
Section 3-3 Guide to Reading  (cont.) Section Theme Government and Democracy   In a time of prosperity, President Johnson ...
Section 3-4 Click the Speaker button  to listen to the audio again.
Section 3-5 Johnson Takes the Reins Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Lyn...
Section 3-6 <ul><li>Johnson differed from Kennedy’s elegant society image. </li></ul><ul><li>Johnson, a Texan, spoke direc...
Section 3-7 <ul><li>Johnson declared that his administration was waging an unconditional  war on poverty  in America.  </l...
Section 3-7 <ul><li>Americans were not ready for Goldwater’s aggressive message, and Johnson won in a landslide. </li></ul...
Section 3-8 What tactics of President Johnson’s became known as the Johnson Treatment? The treatment was Johnson’s way of ...
Section 3-9 The Great Society Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Johnson p...
Section 3-10 <ul><li>Medicaid financed health care for  those on welfare or living below the poverty line.  </li></ul><ul>...
Section 3-11 <ul><li>Johnson urged Congress to act on legislation dealing with the deterioration of inner cities. </li></u...
Section 3-11 <ul><li>“ Model Cities,” a broad-based program with matching funds from local and state agencies, supported p...
Section 3-11 <ul><li>The Immigration Reform Act of 1965 played a key role in changing the composition of the American popu...
Section 3-12 What were some of Johnson’s programs within his Great Society campaign? Click the mouse button or press the  ...
Section 3-12 Upward Bound provided college preparation for low-income teenagers. Between 1965 and 1968, over 60 programs w...
Section 3-13 Legacy of the Great Society Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. <ul><l...
Section 3-16 What remains today of the Great Society? Programs like Medicare and Medicaid as well as the Department of Tra...
Section 3-23 Checking for Understanding __ 1. general agreement __ 2. antipoverty program under President Lyndon Johnson A...
Section 3-24 Checking for Understanding  (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Des...
Section 3-25 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Government and Democra...
Section 3-26 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting   What w...
Section 3-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Photographs   Study t...
Section 3-30 Close Identify several specific health and employment programs of the Johnson era.
End of Section 3
Chapter Summary 1
End of Chapter Summary
Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Define   M...
Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms  (cont.) D...
Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts How was the...
Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts  (cont.) Ho...
Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts  (cont.) Wh...
Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts  (cont.) Wh...
Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts  (cont.) Wh...
Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Analyzing The...
Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking  (cont.) Eval...
Chapter Assessment 10 Geography and History The map on page 743 of your textbook shows the results of the presidential ele...
Chapter Assessment 11 Interpreting Maps   Which regions of the country supported Kennedy? Which regions supported Nixon? N...
Chapter Assessment 12 Geography and History  (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer....
Chapter Assessment 13 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Directions:  Choose the best a...
Chapter Assessment 14 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer. Which president started the  P...
End of Chapter Assessment
CC 1-1 Civics  Eleanor Roosevelt remained a popular and active political figure after her husband’s death. During the 1960...
F/F/F 1-Fact Camelot   In December 1960,  Camelot,  a musical starring Richard Burton and Julie Andrews, opened on Broadwa...
FYI Contents 1 Election of 1960 The  Kennedys Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
FYI 1-1a The 1960 vote was so close that Nixon considered demanding a recount, but then decided against it. He explained t...
FYI 1-2b John Kennedy, his wife, and their two small children were the youngest family to live in the White House since Th...
FYI Contents 2 Peace Corps Manned Space Programs Berlin Wall Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
FYI 2-1a Since the Peace Corps was established in 1961, over 160,000 volunteers have served in 135 countries. Volunteer se...
FYI 2-2b The names of the early manned space programs, Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, were based on mythology. In Roman myth...
FYI 2-3c Although the city of Berlin had been divided into East Berlin and West Berlin since the end of World War II, in A...
FYI 3-1 When Head Start began, it was a summer program, but by 1970 most programs were year round. In 1999 Head Start enro...
Moment in History 1 Click the Speaker button  to listen to the audio again.
You Don’t Say 2-1 Proud Words  Almost two years after the Berlin Wall was built, President Kennedy paid tribute to the spi...
You Don’t Say 3-1 What’s In a Name?   Lyndon Baines Johnson was the second man named Johnson to assume the mantle of the p...
CT Skill Builder 1 Problem Solving Imagine you have just done poorly on a chemistry exam. You wonder why you cannot do bet...
CT Skill Builder 2 Learning the Skill There are six key steps you should follow that will help you through the problem-sol...
CT Skill Builder 3 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the information. Learning the Skill  (cont.) ...
CT Skill Builder 4 <ul><li>Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution. This will help you determine if you have solved the...
CT Skill Builder 5 Practicing the Skill Reread the material in Section 1 on page 720 of your textbook under the heading “K...
CT Skill Builder 6 1. What problem did Kennedy encounter as he tried to pass domestic policy legislation through Congress?...
CT Skill Builder 7 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answers. 3. Explain the solution Kennedy ...
M/C 1-1
M/C 3-1
M/C 4
Why It Matters Transparency
Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer.
Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer.
Daily Focus Skills Transparency 3 Click the mouse button or press the  Space Bar to display the answer.
GO 1
GO 2
GO 3
HELP To navigate within this Presentation Plus! product: Click the  Forward   button to go to the next slide. Click the  P...
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Tar2 Chapter 23

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Tar2 Chapter 23

  1. 1. Splash Screen
  2. 2. Contents Chapter Introduction Section 1 The New Frontier Section 2 JFK and the Cold War Section 3 The Great Society Chapter Summary Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.
  3. 3. Intro 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  4. 4. Intro 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives <ul><li>Summarize Kennedy’s economic policies. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain why Congress often did not support Kennedy’s proposals. </li></ul>Section 1: The New Frontier
  5. 5. Intro 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 2: JFK and the Cold War <ul><li>Describe Kennedy’s plan for the armed forces. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how the Cold War influenced foreign aid and the space program. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Intro 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 3: The Great Society <ul><li>Explain what inspired Johnson’s Great Society programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify several specific health and employment programs of the Johnson administration. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Intro 7 Why It Matters President John F. Kennedy urged Americans to work for progress and to stand firm against the Soviets. Cold War tensions and the threat of nuclear war peaked during the Cuban missile crisis. Kennedy’s assassination changed the nation’s mood, but President Lyndon Johnson embraced ambitious goals, including working toward the passage of major civil rights legislation and eradicating poverty.
  8. 8. Intro 8 The Impact Today Initiatives introduced in this era remain a part of American society. <ul><li>Medicaid and Medicare legislation provides major health benefits for elderly and low-income people. </li></ul><ul><li>•  The Head Start program provides early educational opportunities for disadvantaged children. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  9. 9. Intro 9 continued on next slide
  10. 10. Intro 10
  11. 11. End of Intro
  12. 12. Section 1-1 Guide to Reading John F. Kennedy encountered both success and setbacks on the domestic front. <ul><li>missile gap </li></ul>Main Idea Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Key Terms and Names <ul><li>New Frontier </li></ul><ul><li>Earl Warren </li></ul><ul><li>reapportionment </li></ul><ul><li>due process </li></ul>
  13. 13. Section 1-2 Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Categorizing As you read about the presidency of John F. Kennedy, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 718 of your textbook by filling in the domestic successes and setbacks of Kennedy’s administration. <ul><li>Summarize Kennedy’s economic policies. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Explain why Congress often did not support Kennedy’s proposals. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Section 1-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Civic Rights and Responsibilities The Supreme Court made decisions that protected individual rights, including the “one man, one vote” decision.
  15. 15. Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  16. 16. Section 1-5 The Election of 1960 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The 1960 presidential election began the era of television politics. </li></ul><ul><li>Voters began using this medium as a voting tool. </li></ul><ul><li>The Democratic candidate, John F. Kennedy, was a Catholic from a wealthy Massachusetts family. </li></ul><ul><li>Republican candidate Richard Nixon was a Quaker from a financially struggling family. </li></ul>(pages 718–719)
  17. 17. Section 1-6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During the campaign, Democrats spent over $6 million in television and radio ads, while Republicans spent over $7.5 million. </li></ul><ul><li>The campaign focused on the economy and the Cold War. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy felt the United States faced a threat from the Soviets and showed concern about a “missile gap,” in which it was believed the United States was behind the Soviets in weaponry. </li></ul>The Election of 1960 (cont.) (pages 718–719)
  18. 18. Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Nixon believed the Republican administration was on the right track with its foreign policy. </li></ul><ul><li>The televised debates had a strong influence on the outcome of the election. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy won in what was one of the closest elections in history. </li></ul>The Election of 1960 (cont.) (pages 718–719)
  19. 19. Section 1-8 How did Kennedy and Nixon stand on the two main issues of the 1960 presidential election? The campaign centered on the economy and the Cold War. The candidates differed little on the issues. They both promised to boost the economy, and they were both determined to stop communism. Kennedy claimed there was a “missile gap” between the U.S. and the Soviets in weaponry, in which the U.S. was behind. Nixon countered that the administration was on the right track. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Election of 1960 (cont.) (pages 718–719)
  20. 20. Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Kennedy Mystique <ul><li>John Kennedy’s youth, optimism, and charisma inspired Americans. </li></ul><ul><li>In his Inaugural Address, Kennedy told Americans, “ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.” </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy was the first president to broadcast his press conferences live on television. </li></ul>(pages 719–720)
  21. 21. Section 1-13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Kennedy Mystique (cont.) What was the Kennedy mystique? John Kennedy captured the imagination of the American public. His youth, optimism, and charisma inspired Americans. His good looks, glamorous wife, children, and large extended family drew great media coverage. (pages 719–720)
  22. 22. Section 1-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domestic Front <ul><li>With his new legislative agenda, known as the New Frontier, Kennedy hoped to increase aid to education, provide health insurance to the elderly, create a Department of Urban Affairs, and help migrant workers. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy was unsuccessful in pushing through many of his domestic programs even though the Democratic Party had large majorities in both houses of Congress. </li></ul>(pages 720–721)
  23. 23. Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domestic Front (cont.) <ul><li>Many Republicans and conservative Southern Democrats felt the New Frontier was too costly. </li></ul><ul><li>Congress defeated many of Kennedy’s proposals. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy advocated the New Deal strategy of deficit spending that had been implemented during Roosevelt’s presidency. </li></ul>(pages 720–721)
  24. 24. Section 1-16 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domestic Front (cont.) <ul><li>Congress was convinced to invest more funds for defense and space exploration to create more jobs and encourage economic growth. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy also boosted the economy through increased business production and efficiency. </li></ul>(pages 720–721)
  25. 25. Section 1-16 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Success and Setback on the Domestic Front (cont.) <ul><li>Kennedy helped the women’s movement during the 1960s. </li></ul><ul><li>He created a Presidential Commission on the Status of Women, calling for federal action against gender discrimination and affirming the right of women to equally paid employment. </li></ul>(pages 720–721)
  26. 26. Section 1-17 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Success and Setback on the Domestic Front (cont.) How did Kennedy strain his relationship with the nation’s business community? Businesses were asked to hold down prices and labor leaders were asked to hold down pay increases in an effort to stimulate economic growth. After several steel industries raised prices, Kennedy threatened to purchase cheaper steel from foreign companies. The steel companies backed down after Kennedy was going to have them investigated for price fixing. (pages 720–721)
  27. 27. Section 1-18 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Warren Court Reforms <ul><li>Social issues were a focus during Kennedy’s time in office. </li></ul><ul><li>Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States since Eisenhower’s presidency, and the Warren Court took on a much more activist tone, which helped shape national policy. </li></ul><ul><li>The Warren Court took a stand on several key issues, such as the civil rights movement, freedom of the press, separation of church and state, and the rights of the accused. </li></ul>(pages 721–723)
  28. 28. Section 1-19 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Many of these decisions are still being argued today. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the Warren Court’s most important decisions involved reapportionment, or the way in which states draw up political districts based on changes in population. </li></ul><ul><li>The Warren Court decided on the principle of “one man, one vote,” which required state legislatures to reapportion electoral districts so that all citizens’ votes would have equal weight. </li></ul>Warren Court Reforms (cont.) (pages 721–723)
  29. 29. Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During the 1960s, the U.S. Supreme Court used the Fourteenth Amendment to apply the Bill of Rights to the states. </li></ul><ul><li>Due process required that the law not treat an individual unfairly, arbitrarily, or unreasonably, and that courts must follow proper procedures and rules when trying a case. </li></ul>Warren Court Reforms (cont.) (pages 721–723)
  30. 30. Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The issue of separation between church and state was reaffirmed when the Court ruled that states could not compose official prayers and require prayer in public schools. </li></ul><ul><li>The decisions of the Warren Court were favored by some while opposed by others, but the Court had an immense role in shaping national policy. </li></ul>Warren Court Reforms (cont.) (pages 721–723)
  31. 31. Section 1-21 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Why was the decision of the Warren Court to reapportion electoral districts so important? This shifted political power from rural conservative areas to urban liberal areas. It increased the political power of African Americans and Hispanics who lived in cities. Warren Court Reforms (cont.) (pages 721–723)
  32. 32. Section 1-23 Checking for Understanding __ 1. belief that the Soviet Union had more nuclear weapons than the United States __ 2. the method states use to draw up political districts based on changes in population __ 3. a judicial requirement that laws may not treat individuals unfairly, arbitrarily, or unreasonably, and that courts must follow proper procedures and rules when trying cases A. missile gap B. reapportionment C. due process Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. B C A
  33. 33. Section 1-24 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Summarize the progress made for women’s rights during Kennedy’s administration. The Presidential Commission on the Status of Women was created. Gender discrimination in federal civil service ended, and the Equal Pay Act was passed. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  34. 34. Section 1-25 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Civic Rights and Responsibilities Name three decisions of the Warren Court that protected civil rights. Answers will vary.
  35. 35. Section 1-26 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting In what way was the 1960 presidential election a turning point in campaign history? Television played a more influential role.
  36. 36. Section 1-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Charts Study the chart of Warren Court decisions on page 722 of your textbook. How did the Court expand the rights of the accused? Were these sound decisions? Why or why not? Answers will vary.
  37. 37. Section 1-29 Close Explain why Congress often did not support Kennedy’s proposals.
  38. 38. End of Section 1
  39. 39. Section 2-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading As president, John F. Kennedy had to confront the challenges and fears of the Cold War. <ul><li>flexible response </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>Peace Corps </li></ul><ul><li>space race </li></ul><ul><li>Berlin Wall </li></ul><ul><li>Warren Commission </li></ul>
  40. 40. Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Sequencing As you read about the crises of the Cold War, complete a time line similar to the one on page 724 of your textbook to record the major events of the Cold War in the late 1950s and early 1960s. <ul><li>Describe Kennedy’s plan for the armed forces. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Explain how the Cold War influenced foreign aid and the space program. </li></ul>
  41. 41. Section 2-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Science and Technology During the Cold War, the nation devoted much of its scientific and technological resources to competing with the Soviet Union, especially in getting to the moon.
  42. 42. Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  43. 43. Section 2-5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>As President Kennedy entered the White House, the nation’s rivalry with the Soviet Union deepened. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy felt that Eisenhower had relied too heavily on nuclear weapons. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead, Kennedy supported a “flexible response” where he asked for a buildup of conventional troops and weapons. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy also supported the Special Forces, a small army unit established in the 1950s to wage guerrilla warfare. </li></ul>(pages 724–726)
  44. 44. Section 2-6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges (cont.) <ul><li>To improve Latin American relations, Kennedy proposed the Alliance for Progress, a series of cooperative aid projects with Latin American governments. </li></ul><ul><li>Over a 10-year period, $20 billion was promised to aid Latin America. </li></ul><ul><li>In Chile, Colombia, Venezuela, and the Central American republics, real reform took place. </li></ul>(pages 724–726)
  45. 45. Section 2-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges (cont.) <ul><li>In other countries, the governing rulers used the money to remain in power. </li></ul><ul><li>The Peace Corps, created to help less developed nations fight poverty, trained young Americans to spend two years assisting in a country. </li></ul><ul><li>The Peace Corps is still active today and has become one of Kennedy’s most important and withstanding legacies. </li></ul>(pages 724–726)
  46. 46. Section 2-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges (cont.) <ul><li>During this time of increased tension between the United States and the Soviet Union, the two countries engaged in a space race. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy wanted Americans to be the first to reach the moon. </li></ul><ul><li>On July 20, 1969, Neal Armstrong became the first human being to walk on the moon. </li></ul>(pages 724–726)
  47. 47. Section 2-9 How did President Kennedy confront the global challenges he faced? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges (cont.) (pages 724–726)
  48. 48. Section 2-10 Kennedy supported a “flexible response” where he asked for a buildup of conventional troops and weapons to allow the United States to fight a limited style of warfare. Kennedy also supported the Special Forces, a small army unit established in the 1950s to wage guerrilla warfare. To improve Latin American relations, Kennedy proposed the Alliance for Progress, a series of cooperative aid projects with Latin American governments. The Peace Corps was created to help less developed nations fight poverty. The United States and the Soviet Union engaged in a space race. Kennedy wanted Americans to be the first to reach the moon. On July 20, 1969, Neal Armstrong made that goal a reality. Kennedy Confronts Global Challenges (cont.) (pages 724–726)
  49. 49. Section 2-10 Crises of the Cold War Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Cuba and its leader, Fidel Castro, began forming an alliance with the Soviet Union and its leader, Nikita Khrushchev. </li></ul><ul><li>During Eisenhower’s presidency, the CIA had secretly trained and armed Cuban exiles known as La Brigada. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy’s advisers approved a plan to invade Cuba using La Brigada. </li></ul><ul><li>On April 17, 1961, 1,400 armed Cuban exiles landed at the Bay of Pigs on the south coast of Cuba. </li></ul>(pages 726–728)
  50. 50. Section 2-11 <ul><li>Disaster struck as Kennedy cancelled air support for the exiles in order to keep United States involvement a secret. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the La Brigada were either killed or captured by Castro’s army. </li></ul><ul><li>After meeting with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, Kennedy refused to recognize East Germany or to have the United States–along with Great Britain and France–withdraw from Berlin. </li></ul>Crises of the Cold War (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 726–728)
  51. 51. Section 2-12 <ul><li>The Soviet leader retaliated by constructing a wall through Berlin, stopping movement between the Soviet sector and the rest of the city. </li></ul><ul><li>For the next 30 years, the Berlin Wall symbolized the Cold War division between East and West. </li></ul><ul><li>During the summer of 1962, American intelligence agencies discovered that Soviet technicians and equipment had arrived in Cuba. </li></ul>Crises of the Cold War (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 726–728)
  52. 52. Section 2-12 <ul><li>Photographs proved that the Soviets had placed long-range missiles in Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy ordered a naval blockade to stop the Soviets from delivering more missiles. </li></ul><ul><li>As Soviet ships headed toward the blockade, Americans braced for war. </li></ul><ul><li>Neither Kennedy nor Khrushchev wanted nuclear war. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy agreed not to invade Cuba and to remove missiles in Turkey. </li></ul>Crises of the Cold War (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 726–728)
  53. 53. Section 2-12 <ul><li>The Soviets agreed to remove missiles in Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>The Cuban missile crisis, as it became known, brought the world to the edge of a nuclear war. </li></ul><ul><li>Both sides agreed to work out a plan to ease tension. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1963 the United States and the Soviet Union agreed to a treaty banning the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. </li></ul>Crises of the Cold War (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 726–728)
  54. 54. Section 2-12 <ul><li>The missile crisis led to Nikita Khrushchev’s fall from power, and the new Soviet leadership was less interested in reaching agreements with the West. </li></ul><ul><li>The result was a huge Soviet arms buildup. </li></ul>Crises of the Cold War (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 726–728)
  55. 55. Section 2-13 Why was the Bay of Pigs a dark moment for the Kennedy administration? The action revealed the American plot to overthrow a neighbor’s government. It made the United States appear weak and disorganized. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Crises of the Cold War (cont.) (pages 726–728)
  56. 56. Section 2-14 The Death of a President Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>On November 22, 1963, John F. Kennedy was shot twice while riding in a presidential motorcade. </li></ul><ul><li>He was pronounced dead a short time later. </li></ul><ul><li>Lee Harvey Oswald, a Marxist, was accused of killing Kennedy and was shot and killed himself two days later by Jack Ruby. </li></ul><ul><li>It was suspected that Ruby killed Oswald to protect others involved in the murder. </li></ul>(pages 728–729)
  57. 57. Section 2-15 <ul><li>Chief Justice Warren concluded that Oswald was the lone gunman. </li></ul><ul><li>The report of the Warren Commission left a few questions unanswered, and a conspiracy theory has persisted, although none has gained wide acceptance. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy’s successor, Lyndon Johnson, set out to implement many of Kennedy’s programs. </li></ul>The Death of a President (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 728–729)
  58. 58. Section 2-17 What was the result of the Warren Commission report? Chief Justice Warren concluded that Oswald was the lone gunman. The report of the Warren Commission left a few questions unanswered, and a conspiracy theory has persisted, although none has gained wide acceptance. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Death of a President (cont.) (pages 728–729)
  59. 59. Section 2-19 Checking for Understanding __ 1. refers to the Cold War competition over dominance of space exploration capability __ 2. the buildup of conventional troops and weapons to allow a nation to fight a limited war without using nuclear weapons A. flexible response B. space race Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. A B
  60. 60. Section 2-20 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Explain the goals of the Alliance for Progress. The goals were to create cooperative aid projects that helped establish better schools, improve housing, distribute land more equitably, and improve health care.
  61. 61. Section 2-21 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Science and Technology What was Kennedy’s goal for the United States in the space race? Kennedy’s goal was to beat the Soviets to the moon.
  62. 62. Section 2-22 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting What was the role of foreign aid in the relations between the United States and Latin America? Its role was to help governments stay in power and prevent Communist revolutions.
  63. 63. Section 2-24 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the photographs on pages 726 – 727 in your textbook. Explain how space exploration has led to other innovations that have affected our daily lives and standard of living. Space discoveries have provided new solutions to problems faced by the disabled as well as scientists.
  64. 64. Section 2-25 Close Explain how the Cold War influenced foreign aid and the space program.
  65. 65. End of Section 2
  66. 66. Section 3-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading Lyndon Johnson succeeded John F. Kennedy as president and greatly expanded Kennedy’s agenda with far-reaching programs in many areas. <ul><li>consensus </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>war on poverty </li></ul><ul><li>VISTA </li></ul><ul><li>Great Society </li></ul><ul><li>Medicare </li></ul><ul><li>Medicaid </li></ul><ul><li>Head Start </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Weaver </li></ul>
  67. 67. Section 3-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Organizing As you read about Lyndon Johnson’s presidency, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 732 of your textbook to list the social and economic programs started during his administration. <ul><li>Explain what inspired Johnson’s Great Society programs. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Identify several specific health and employment programs of the Johnson administration. </li></ul>
  68. 68. Section 3-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Government and Democracy In a time of prosperity, President Johnson won support for extending government aid to the poor and elderly.
  69. 69. Section 3-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  70. 70. Section 3-5 Johnson Takes the Reins Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Lyndon Johnson took office during what seemed like a prosperous time for the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>In reality, however, away from the nation’s affluent suburbs were some 50 million poor. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy and Johnson made the elimination of poverty a major policy goal. </li></ul>(pages 732–735)
  71. 71. Section 3-6 <ul><li>Johnson differed from Kennedy’s elegant society image. </li></ul><ul><li>Johnson, a Texan, spoke directly and roughly at times. </li></ul><ul><li>He sought ways to find consensus, or general agreement. </li></ul><ul><li>His ability to build coalitions made him one of the most effective and powerful leaders in Senate history. </li></ul>Johnson Takes the Reins (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 732–735)
  72. 72. Section 3-7 <ul><li>Johnson declared that his administration was waging an unconditional war on poverty in America. </li></ul><ul><li>By the summer of 1964, Congress had created the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO), which focused on creating jobs and fighting poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>The election of 1964 had Johnson running against Republican candidate Barry Goldwater. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Johnson Takes the Reins (cont.) (pages 732–735)
  73. 73. Section 3-7 <ul><li>Americans were not ready for Goldwater’s aggressive message, and Johnson won in a landslide. </li></ul>Johnson Takes the Reins (cont.) (pages 732–735)
  74. 74. Section 3-8 What tactics of President Johnson’s became known as the Johnson Treatment? The treatment was Johnson’s way of persuading others to agree with him. His reputation for getting things done involved doing favors, twisting arms, bargaining, flattering, and sometimes threatening. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Johnson Takes the Reins (cont.) (pages 732–735)
  75. 75. Section 3-9 The Great Society Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Johnson promised a Great Society during his campaign. </li></ul><ul><li>It was the vision of a more perfect, more equitable society. </li></ul><ul><li>Between 1965 and 1968, over 60 programs were passed, including Medicare and Medicaid. </li></ul><ul><li>Medicare was a health insurance program for the elderly funded through Social Security. </li></ul>(pages 735–737)
  76. 76. Section 3-10 <ul><li>Medicaid financed health care for those on welfare or living below the poverty line. </li></ul><ul><li>Johnson’s interest in education led to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and to the preschool program Project Head Start, which was administered to disadvantaged children. </li></ul>The Great Society (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 735–737)
  77. 77. Section 3-11 <ul><li>Johnson urged Congress to act on legislation dealing with the deterioration of inner cities. </li></ul><ul><li>Congress responded with the creation of the Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1965. </li></ul><ul><li>Its first secretary, Robert Weaver, was the first African American to serve in a cabinet. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Great Society (cont.) (pages 735–737)
  78. 78. Section 3-11 <ul><li>“ Model Cities,” a broad-based program with matching funds from local and state agencies, supported programs in the areas of transportation, health care, housing, and policing. </li></ul>The Great Society (cont.) (pages 735–737)
  79. 79. Section 3-11 <ul><li>The Immigration Reform Act of 1965 played a key role in changing the composition of the American population. </li></ul>The Great Society (cont.) <ul><li>It kept a strict limit on the number of immigrants admitted to the United States each year. </li></ul><ul><li>It also eliminated the national origins system, which gave preference to northern European immigrants. Immigrants arrived in the U.S. from all parts of Europe and from Asia and Africa. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 735–737)
  80. 80. Section 3-12 What were some of Johnson’s programs within his Great Society campaign? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Great Society (cont.) (pages 735–737)
  81. 81. Section 3-12 Upward Bound provided college preparation for low-income teenagers. Between 1965 and 1968, over 60 programs were passed, including Medicare and Medicaid. Medicare was a health insurance program for the elderly funded through Social Security. Medicaid financed health care for those on welfare, living below the poverty line. The preschool program, Project Head Start, administered to disadvantaged children. The Great Society (cont.) (pages 735–737)
  82. 82. Section 3-13 Legacy of the Great Society Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The impact of the Great Society was felt by all aspects of American life and improved many lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Some Americans opposed the massive growth of federal funds and criticized the Great Society for intruding too much in their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a continued debate over the success of the Great Society. </li></ul><ul><li>It did result in many Americans asking questions, questions Americans continue to ask today. </li></ul>(pages 737–738)
  83. 83. Section 3-16 What remains today of the Great Society? Programs like Medicare and Medicaid as well as the Department of Transportation and the Department of Housing and Urban Development and Project Head Start are what remain today of the Great Society. Legacy of the Great Society (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. (pages 737–738)
  84. 84. Section 3-23 Checking for Understanding __ 1. general agreement __ 2. antipoverty program under President Lyndon Johnson A. consensus B. war on poverty Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. B A
  85. 85. Section 3-24 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Describe how the Great Society programs were inspired. Johnson wanted to fulfill FDR’s mission for a nation of equal opportunity.
  86. 86. Section 3-25 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Government and Democracy How did Johnson’s war on poverty strive to ensure greater fairness in American society? Johnson’s war on poverty offered the less fortunate education, training, and access to jobs.
  87. 87. Section 3-26 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting What were three legacies of the Great Society? Possible answers: Medicare and Medicaid, political experience for minorities, and Project Head Start are legacies of the Great Society.
  88. 88. Section 3-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Photographs Study the photograph on page 734 of your textbook. Why do you think pictures such as this one would help build support for the war on poverty? Answers will vary.
  89. 89. Section 3-30 Close Identify several specific health and employment programs of the Johnson era.
  90. 90. End of Section 3
  91. 91. Chapter Summary 1
  92. 92. End of Chapter Summary
  93. 93. Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 1. the method states use to draw up political districts based on changes in population __ 2. general agreement __ 3. the buildup of conventional troops and weapons to allow a nation to fight a limited war without using nuclear weapons __ 4. belief that the Soviet Union had more nuclear weapons than the United States A. missile gap B. reapportionment C. due process D. flexible response E. space race F. consensus G. war on poverty F D B A
  94. 94. Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms (cont.) Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 5. a judicial requirement that laws may not treat individuals unfairly, arbitrarily, or unreasonably, and that courts must follow proper procedures and rules when trying cases __ 6. refers to the Cold War competition over dominance of space exploration capability __ 7. antipoverty program under President Lyndon Johnson E G C A. missile gap B. reapportionment C. due process D. flexible response E. space race F. consensus G. war on poverty
  95. 95. Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts How was the 1960 presidential election a new kind of campaign? The campaign marked the first time that television played a major role, including the televised debate between Kennedy and Nixon.
  96. 96. Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) How close was the outcome of the 1960 presidential election between Nixon and Kennedy? Kennedy won the popular vote by only 118,000, with 68 million votes cast. In the Electoral College, the margin was greater: 303 to 219.
  97. 97. Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What were three measures Kennedy took to strengthen the economy? He used deficit spending, invested in space exploration and defense to create jobs, and asked businesses to hold down prices and labor leaders to hold down pay increase requests.
  98. 98. Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What inspired President Johnson’s war on poverty? Johnson’s personal experiences and the nation’s ability to finance programs inspired President Johnson’s war on poverty.
  99. 99. Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What was the purpose of Medicare, passed during Johnson’s administration? Medicare was designed as a health insurance program for the elderly.
  100. 100. Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Analyzing Themes: Government and Democracy Why were Medicare and Medicaid landmark pieces of legislation in American history? They represented the first time that the U.S. government had funded health care on a large scale.
  101. 101. Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking (cont.) Evaluating   In the 1960 presidential debate, most radio listeners thought Nixon had won, while most television viewers thought Kennedy had. Why do you think this was so? Kennedy’s physical appearance and demeanor made a positive impact on the television audience. Their reaction to Nixon’s appearance and demeanor was negative. Because they could only hear the candidates, radio listeners had a different reaction.
  102. 102. Chapter Assessment 10 Geography and History The map on page 743 of your textbook shows the results of the presidential election of 1960. Study the map and answer the questions on the following slides.
  103. 103. Chapter Assessment 11 Interpreting Maps   Which regions of the country supported Kennedy? Which regions supported Nixon? Nixon found support in the Midwest and West, while Kennedy was strong in the Northeast and some Southern and Midwestern states. Geography and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  104. 104. Chapter Assessment 12 Geography and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Applying Geography Skills   What would have happened if Kennedy had lost New York to Nixon? Nixon would have won the election by six electoral votes.
  105. 105. Chapter Assessment 13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Directions: Choose the best answer to the following question. Which of the following was an effect of a ruling by the Warren Court? A State-mandated Bible readings allowed in schools B Extended rights for people accused of crimes C Unlawfully seized evidence is admissible at trial D Increased state authority at the expense of federal authority Test-Taking Tip Use the process of elimination to answer this question. The Warren Court expanded individual civil liberties and the power of the judicial branch. Eliminate answers that go against these ideas.
  106. 106. Chapter Assessment 14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Which president started the Peace Corps? President Kennedy started the Peace Corps.
  107. 107. End of Chapter Assessment
  108. 108. CC 1-1 Civics Eleanor Roosevelt remained a popular and active political figure after her husband’s death. During the 1960 presidential campaign, she appeared in a television commercial urging people to vote for Kennedy because he was the man to improve human rights. Her appearance indicated to traditional Democrats and women that Kennedy was the man for the job.
  109. 109. F/F/F 1-Fact Camelot In December 1960, Camelot, a musical starring Richard Burton and Julie Andrews, opened on Broadway in New York City. The Kennedys attended the show, which told the legend of the heroism of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, and so enjoyed it that they listened to the music often. The president’s favorite song included the lines: “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was known as Camelot.” In later years, the Kennedy presidency became known as “Camelot,” largely because of Mrs. Kennedy. Shortly after the president’s death in 1963, she told a journalist that all she could think about was the president’s favorite line. She went on to say: “There’ll be great presidents again, . . . but there’ll never be another Camelot again.” Journalist Theodore H. White later wrote that “all she could repeat was, ‘Tell people there will never be that Camelot again.’” In the legendary Camelot, leaders sat at a round table. With no head of the table, it was implied that rule was by all, not just by one.
  110. 110. FYI Contents 1 Election of 1960 The Kennedys Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
  111. 111. FYI 1-1a The 1960 vote was so close that Nixon considered demanding a recount, but then decided against it. He explained that if there were a recount, “the organization of the new administration and the orderly transfer of responsibility from the old to the new might be delayed for months. The situation within the entire federal government would be chaotic.”
  112. 112. FYI 1-2b John Kennedy, his wife, and their two small children were the youngest family to live in the White House since Theodore Roosevelt’s days.
  113. 113. FYI Contents 2 Peace Corps Manned Space Programs Berlin Wall Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
  114. 114. FYI 2-1a Since the Peace Corps was established in 1961, over 160,000 volunteers have served in 135 countries. Volunteer sectors include education, environment, health, business, and agriculture. In 2001 there were 7,300 Peace Corps volunteers serving in 72 countries.
  115. 115. FYI 2-2b The names of the early manned space programs, Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, were based on mythology. In Roman mythology, for example, Mercury was the messenger of the gods. In Greek mythology, Apollo carried the sun across the sky in his chariot each day.
  116. 116. FYI 2-3c Although the city of Berlin had been divided into East Berlin and West Berlin since the end of World War II, in August 1961 an actual wall of concrete, barbed wire, and stone was erected.
  117. 117. FYI 3-1 When Head Start began, it was a summer program, but by 1970 most programs were year round. In 1999 Head Start enrollment was over 800,000 and cost an average of $5,400 per child.
  118. 118. Moment in History 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  119. 119. You Don’t Say 2-1 Proud Words Almost two years after the Berlin Wall was built, President Kennedy paid tribute to the spirit of Berliners when he spoke to a crowd gathered near the wall. He said, “All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin. And, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ (I am a Berliner).”
  120. 120. You Don’t Say 3-1 What’s In a Name? Lyndon Baines Johnson was the second man named Johnson to assume the mantle of the presidency after an assassination. Andrew Johnson became president after President Lincoln was killed.
  121. 121. CT Skill Builder 1 Problem Solving Imagine you have just done poorly on a chemistry exam. You wonder why you cannot do better since you always go to class, take notes, and study for exams. In order to improve your grades, you need to identify the specific problem and then take actions to solve it. Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  122. 122. CT Skill Builder 2 Learning the Skill There are six key steps you should follow that will help you through the problem-solving process. <ul><li>Identify the problem. In the case listed above, you know that you are not doing well on chemistry exams. </li></ul><ul><li>Gather information. You know that you always go to class and take notes. You study by yourself for about two hours each day for two or three days before the exam. You also know that you sometimes forget details or get confused about things as you are taking the exam. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Problem Solving
  123. 123. CT Skill Builder 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Learning the Skill (cont.) Problem Solving <ul><li>List and consider possible solutions. For example, instead of studying by yourself, you might try studying with a friend or a group. You might also study for shorter timespans to avoid overloading yourself with information. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the advantages and disadvantages of each solution. </li></ul><ul><li>Now that you have listed and considered the possible options, you need to choose the best solution to your problem. Choose what you think is the right solution, and carry it out. </li></ul>
  124. 124. CT Skill Builder 4 <ul><li>Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution. This will help you determine if you have solved the problem. If you earn better scores on the next few chemistry tests, you will know that you have solved your problem. </li></ul>Problem Solving Learning the Skill (cont.)
  125. 125. CT Skill Builder 5 Practicing the Skill Reread the material in Section 1 on page 720 of your textbook under the heading “Kennedy Struggles with Congress.” Use that information and the steps listed on the previous slides to answer the questions on the following slides. Problem Solving
  126. 126. CT Skill Builder 6 1. What problem did Kennedy encounter as he tried to pass domestic policy legislation through Congress? 2. What options were available to the president in facing this opposition? What were the advantages and disadvantages? Kennedy was met with congressional resistance when he tried to pass domestic policy legislation. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Problem Solving He could push harder for all aspects of his agenda or reserve his bargaining power for only the issues that were truly important and winnable. Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  127. 127. CT Skill Builder 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. 3. Explain the solution Kennedy implemented to solve his problem. 4. Evaluate the effectiveness of Kennedy’s solution. Was it successful? How do you determine this? He chose to reserve his bargaining power. Answers will vary. Problem Solving Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  128. 128. M/C 1-1
  129. 129. M/C 3-1
  130. 130. M/C 4
  131. 131. Why It Matters Transparency
  132. 132. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  133. 133. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  134. 134. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  135. 135. GO 1
  136. 136. GO 2
  137. 137. GO 3
  138. 138. HELP To navigate within this Presentation Plus! product: Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Section Back button to return to the beginning of the section you are in. If you are viewing a feature, this button returns you to the main presentation. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Help button to access this screen. Click the Speaker button to listen to available audio. Click the Speaker Off button to stop any playing audio. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Click the Maps and Chart button in the top right corner of many slides to link to relevant In-Motion and static maps and charts. Presentation Plus! features such as the Reference Atlas , History Online , and others are located in the left margin of most screens. Click on any of these buttons to access a specific feature.
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