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chapter 29

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chapt 29

chapt 29

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  • 1. Splash Screen
  • 2. Contents Chapter Introduction Section 1 The Technological Revolution Section 2 The Clinton Years Section 3 An Interdependent World Section 4 America Enters a New Century Section 5 The War on Terrorism Chapter Summary Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.
  • 3. Intro 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 4. Intro 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives <ul><li>Describe the evolution of the computer from scientific tool to household appliance. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate how the computer has revolutionized science, medicine, and communications. </li></ul>Section 1: The Technological Revolution
  • 5. Intro 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 2: The Clinton Years <ul><li>Describe the difficulties and successes of Bill Clinton’s two terms as president. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the nation’s involvement in world affairs during the Clinton presidency. </li></ul>
  • 6. Intro 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 3: An Interdependent World <ul><li>Explain the development of regional economic blocs around the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Assess environmental issues that have become important internationally. </li></ul>
  • 7. Intro 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 4: America Enters a New Century <ul><li>Describe the unusual circumstances surrounding the outcome of the 2000 presidential election. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the programs President George W. Bush initiated. </li></ul>
  • 8. Intro 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 5: The War on Terrorism <ul><li>Describe the development of Middle East terrorism. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the response of the United States to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. </li></ul>
  • 9. Intro 7 Why It Matters During the 1990s, a technological revolution transformed society. President Clinton pushed for budget cuts, health care and welfare reforms, and global trade. He also worked for peace in the Middle East and the Balkans. In 2000 George W. Bush won the presidency. He supported tax cuts, a new energy program, increased trade, and a missile defense system. After terrorists killed thousands of people in the United States, the new president launched a war on terrorism.
  • 10. Intro 8 The Impact Today Major developments of the era continue to influence modern society. <ul><li>The use of the Internet is widespread in commerce, schools, and government.   </li></ul><ul><li>The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) continues to shape economic relations between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. </li></ul><ul><li>The debate between conservatives and liberals continues in the United States. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 11. Intro 9 continued on next slide
  • 12. Intro 10
  • 13. End of Intro
  • 14. Section 1-1 Guide to Reading The introduction of the first electronic digital computer in 1946 launched a technological revolution. <ul><li>ENIAC </li></ul>Main Idea Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Key Terms and Names <ul><li>integrated circuit </li></ul><ul><li>Silicon Valley </li></ul><ul><li>microprocessor </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Gates </li></ul><ul><li>software </li></ul><ul><li>telecommute </li></ul><ul><li>Internet </li></ul><ul><li>biotechnology </li></ul><ul><li>James Watson </li></ul><ul><li>Francis Crick </li></ul><ul><li>DNA </li></ul>
  • 15. Section 1-2 Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Categorizing As you read about the computer age, complete a chart similar to the one on page 892 of your textbook to describe products that revolutionized the computer industry. <ul><li>Describe the evolution of the computer from scientific tool to household appliance. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Evaluate how the computer has revolutionized science, medicine, and communications. </li></ul>
  • 16. Section 1-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Economic Factors The computer has helped reshape the nation’s economy.
  • 17. Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 18. Section 1-5 The Rise of the Compact Computer Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1946 the world’s first electronic digital computer, called ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), went into operation. </li></ul><ul><li>Weighing over 30 tons, the machine was the size of a small house. </li></ul>(pages 892–893)
  • 19. Section 1-6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1959 Robert Noyce designed the first integrated circuit, a complete electronic circuit on a single chip of the element silicon, making circuits much smaller and easier to make. </li></ul><ul><li>Many electronic companies opened in an area south of San Francisco, giving it the nickname Silicon Valley. </li></ul>The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 20. Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1968 Noyce and colleague Gordon Moore formed Intel, a company that revolutionized computers with the creation of microprocessors. </li></ul><ul><li>These chips had several integrated circuits on them that further reduced the size of computers and increased their speed. </li></ul>The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 21. Section 1-7a Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Stephen Wozniak and Steven Jobs set out to build a small computer using the microprocessor technology. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1976 the pair founded Apple Computer. </li></ul><ul><li>Apple’s success created intense competition in the computer industry. </li></ul>The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 22. Section 1-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1981 International Business Machines (IBM) introduced the “Personal Computer” (PC). </li></ul><ul><li>In 1984 Apple responded with the Macintosh, featuring a much simpler operating system that used on-screen graphic symbols called icons, which users could control with a hand-operated device called a mouse. </li></ul>The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 23. Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>At the same time Apple was being created, 19-year-old Harvard dropout Bill Gates co-founded Microsoft to design PC software, the instructions used to program computers to perform certain tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1985 Microsoft introduced “Windows,” which brought the mouse-activated on-screen graphics to PCs. </li></ul>The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 24. Section 1-10 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>By the late 1990s, many workers used a home computer and electronic mail to telecommute –do their jobs at home via their computer. </li></ul><ul><li>Wireless handheld devices and laptop computers have made computer use more convenient. </li></ul><ul><li>Now, Internet access and its use are more widespread. </li></ul>The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 25. Section 1-11 How did compact computers change the workplace? Compact computers linked employees within an office or among office branches. Compact computers became essential tools in every kind of business. Many workers used a home computer and electronic mail to telecommute–do their jobs at home via their computer. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Rise of the Compact Computer (cont.) (pages 892–893)
  • 26. Section 1-12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Telecommunications Revolution <ul><li>During the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, the deregulation of telecommunications created an explosion of creativity and competition in the telephone and television industries. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1996 Congress passed the Telecommunications Act. </li></ul><ul><li>The act allowed telephone companies to compete with each other, send television signals, and permitted cable television companies to offer telephone service. </li></ul>(pages 893–894)
  • 27. Section 1-13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What did the Telecommunications Act of 1996 achieve? The act allowed telephone companies to compete with each other, send television signals, and permitted cable television companies to offer telephone service. The Telecommunications Revolution (cont.) (pages 893–894)
  • 28. Section 1-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Rise of the Internet <ul><li>Digital electronics made worldwide communications possible with the creation of the Internet, a global information system. </li></ul><ul><li>The roots of this networking system began with the U.S. Defense Department’s Advanced Research Project Agency in 1969. </li></ul><ul><li>Known as ARPANET, this system linked government agencies, defense contractors, and scientists at various universities. </li></ul>(page 894)
  • 29. Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The use of the Internet expanded by almost 300 percent between 1997 and 2000. </li></ul><ul><li>The Internet also created a “dot.com” economy selling products and advertising online. </li></ul>The Rise of the Internet (cont.) (page 894)
  • 30. Section 1-16 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What led to the expansion of the Internet? The development of the hypertext transport protocol (http) and new software called Web browsers led to the Internet expansion. The Rise of the Internet (cont.) (page 894)
  • 31. Section 1-17 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Breakthroughs in Biotechnology <ul><li>Computers aided scientists in biotechnology, the managing of biological systems to improve human life. </li></ul><ul><li>Researchers have used this to develop new medicines, animal growth hormones, genetically engineered plants, and industrial chemicals. </li></ul>(pages 894–895)
  • 32. Section 1-18 <ul><li>The first break in biotechnology occurred in 1953, when American molecular biologist James Watson and his British colleague, Francis Crick, deciphered the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the genetic material in cells that determines all forms of life. </li></ul>Breakthroughs in Biotechnology (cont.) (pages 894–895)
  • 33. Section 1-19 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>With the development of supercomputers, it was possible to map out the human genome, recording the DNA sequence in our species. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1990 the National Institutes of Health made its data available to scientists on the Internet with the hope that no single nation or private laboratory will limit the use of genome findings. </li></ul>Breakthroughs in Biotechnology (cont.) (pages 894–895)
  • 34. Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Medical research has grown more sophisticated and today many people debate the issues of human cloning and stem cell research. </li></ul>Breakthroughs in Biotechnology (cont.) (pages 894–895)
  • 35. Section 1-21 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What impact did James Watson and Francis Crick have on society? Their discovery of the structure of DNA led to an improvement in medical research on cancer and heart disease and helped law enforcement by establishing DNA as indisputable as a fingerprint in identification. Breakthroughs in Biotechnology (cont.) (pages 894–895)
  • 36. Section 1-22 Checking for Understanding __ 1. a computer processor containing both memory and computing functions on a single chip __ 2. the genetic material in cells that determines all forms of life __ 3. to work at home by means of an electronic linkup with a central office __ 4. a computer program __ 5. an electronic communications network that connects computer networks and organizational computer facilities around the world A. microprocessor B. software C. telecommute D. Internet E. DNA Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. E C A B D
  • 37. Section 1-23 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Explain how scientific discoveries in biotechnology have improved people’s lives. Scientific discoveries have led to the development of artificial genes and assisted genetic engineering of plants, animals, and humans. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 38. Section 1-24 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Economic Factors How have personal computers transformed the workplace? Personal computers linked employees, became essential in all kinds of business, and allowed people to telecommute.
  • 39. Section 1-25 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing How have advances in telecommunications and the rise of the Internet affected the standard of living in the United States? New technology, such as Web-enabled cell phones and the Internet, made a new communications system possible and spawned the “dot.com” economy.
  • 40. Section 1-26 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the crowd in the photograph of George W. Bush at Fort Campbell on page 891 of your textbook. How would you describe the attitudes reflected in the faces of the people photographed? Most people look happy.
  • 41. Section 1-27 Close How has the computer revolutionized daily life?
  • 42. End of Section 1
  • 43. Section 2-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading Although President Clinton struggled with Republicans in Congress and faced impeachment, several major economic and social reforms were achieved during his presidency. <ul><li>AmeriCorps </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>Contract with America </li></ul><ul><li>Kenneth Starr </li></ul><ul><li>perjury </li></ul><ul><li>ethnic cleansing </li></ul><ul><li>Dayton Accords </li></ul>
  • 44. Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Taking Notes As you read about the administration of President Clinton, use the major headings of the section to create an outline similar to the one on page 896 of your textbook. <ul><li>Describe the difficulties and successes of Bill Clinton’s two terms as president. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Discuss the nation’s involvement in world affairs during the Clinton presidency. </li></ul>
  • 45. Section 2-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Economic Factors The United States, along with much of the industrialized world, experienced economic prosperity in the 1990s.
  • 46. Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 47. Section 2-5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Agenda Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>President Bill Clinton’s domestic program focused on the economy, the family, education, crime, and health care. </li></ul><ul><li>Clinton felt the problem with the economy was due to the federal deficit. </li></ul><ul><li>The high deficits caused the government to borrow large sums of money, which drove up interest rates. </li></ul><ul><li>Clinton felt that the key to economic growth was to lower interest rates. </li></ul>(pages 896–897)
  • 48. Section 2-6 <ul><li>Because Clinton had difficulty cutting government spending that went to entitlement programs, he implemented new taxes. </li></ul><ul><li>Republicans in Congress refused to support the plan, but after Clinton put pressure on Democrats in Congress, a revised version of his tax plan was passed. </li></ul>Clinton’s Agenda (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 896–897)
  • 49. Section 2-7 <ul><li>Clinton appointed his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, to head a task force to prepare a health care plan. </li></ul><ul><li>The plan guaranteed health care for all Americans, but it was widely opposed by employers, small business owners, the insurance industry, doctor’s organizations, and Republicans. </li></ul><ul><li>In the end, the plan died without ever coming to a vote. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Agenda (cont.) (pages 896–897)
  • 50. Section 2-8 <ul><li>Clinton pushed through several pieces of legislation to help the American family. </li></ul><ul><li>The Family Medical Leave Act gave workers up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid family leave for the birth or adoption of a child, or the illness of a family member. </li></ul><ul><li>Clinton also had Congress create AmeriCorps, a program that put students to work improving low-income housing, teaching children to read, and cleaning up the environment. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Agenda (cont.) (pages 896–897)
  • 51. Section 2-9 <ul><li>Democrats in Congress passed a gun-control law known as the Brady Bill that imposed a waiting period before people could buy handguns. </li></ul><ul><li>Clinton introduced a bill that provided extra funds to states to build new prisons and put 100,000 more police officers on the streets. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Agenda (cont.) (pages 896–897)
  • 52. Section 2-10 What five major areas did President Clinton’s domestic program focus on? Clinton’s domestic program focused on the economy, the family, education, crime, and health care. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Clinton’s Agenda (cont.) (pages 896–897)
  • 53. Section 2-11 The Republicans Gain Control of Congress Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>By late 1994, Clinton had become very unpopular. </li></ul><ul><li>He had raised taxes, was unable to fix the health care system, and many companies continued to downsize. </li></ul><ul><li>These problems, combined with a few scandals involving Clinton, caused many Americans to vote Republican in the elections of 1994. </li></ul>(page 898)
  • 54. Section 2-12 <ul><li>In 1994 congressional Republican leaders, led by Newt Gingrich, created the Contract with America, in which Republicans promised 10 major changes. </li></ul><ul><li>The changes included lower taxes, term limits for members of Congress, and a balanced budget amendment. </li></ul><ul><li>For the first time in 40 years, Republicans had won a majority in both houses of Congress. </li></ul>The Republicans Gain Control of Congress (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 898)
  • 55. Section 2-13 <ul><li>In 1995, instead of backing down to the Republicans in Congress, Clinton allowed the federal government to close when a budget agreement could not be reached. </li></ul><ul><li>The Republicans in Congress and the president eventually worked together to balance the budget. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Republicans Gain Control of Congress (cont.) (page 898)
  • 56. Section 2-14 <ul><li>Prior to the 1996 election, Clinton and the Republicans worked to pass the Health Insurance Portability Act to improve health coverage, and the Welfare Reform Act, which limited people to no more than two consecutive years on welfare and required them to work to receive welfare. </li></ul>The Republicans Gain Control of Congress (cont.) (page 898)
  • 57. Section 2-15 What happened to the Contract with America? The Senate defeated several of the proposals, including the balanced budget amendment, while the president vetoed others. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Republicans Gain Control of Congress (cont.) (page 898)
  • 58. Section 2-16 The 1996 Election Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During the 1996 presidential election, Clinton took credit for the booming economy. </li></ul><ul><li>The economic boom of the 1990s was the longest sustained period of growth in United States history. </li></ul><ul><li>Unemployment and inflation were at their lowest levels in 40 years, the stock market soared, wages increased, and crime declined. </li></ul>(pages 898–899)
  • 59. Section 2-17 <ul><li>Clinton won re-election against Republican candidate, Senator Bob Dole of Kansas. </li></ul><ul><li>Republicans retained control of Congress. </li></ul>The 1996 Election (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 898–899)
  • 60. Section 2-18 Who else entered the race for president in 1996 besides Clinton and Dole? The candidate for the Reform Party was H. Ross Perot. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The 1996 Election (cont.) (pages 898–899)
  • 61. Section 2-19 Clinton’s Second Term Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During Clinton’s second term in office, the economy continued to expand. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1997, for the first time in 24 years, the president submitted a balanced budget to Congress. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1998 the government ran a surplus, meaning it collected more money than it spent. </li></ul>(pages 899–900)
  • 62. Section 2-20 <ul><li>In his second term, Clinton aimed his proposals toward children’s needs. </li></ul><ul><li>He asked Congress to pass a $500-per-child tax credit and pass a ban on cigarette advertising directed toward children. </li></ul><ul><li>He signed an Adoption and Safe Families Act, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, providing insurance for children whose parents could not afford it. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Second Term (cont.) (pages 899–900)
  • 63. Section 2-21 <ul><li>In 1998 a scandal involving President Clinton threatened his presidency. </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning in his first term, Clinton was accused of arranging for illegal loans to Whitewater Development. </li></ul><ul><li>Attorney General Janet Reno appointed an independent counsel, Kenneth Starr, to investigate the president. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Second Term (cont.) (pages 899–900)
  • 64. Section 2-22 <ul><li>In early 1998, a new scandal involving a personal relationship with a White House intern suggested that the president had committed perjury, or lied under oath. </li></ul><ul><li>Starr was appointed to investigate this as well. </li></ul><ul><li>In his report, Starr argued that Clinton had obstructed justice, abused his power as president, and committed perjury. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Second Term (cont.) (pages 899–900)
  • 65. Section 2-23 <ul><li>In 1998 the House passed two articles of impeachment. </li></ul><ul><li>On February 12, 1999, the senators cast their votes, with the result short of the two-thirds needed to remove Clinton. </li></ul><ul><li>Although Clinton was not removed from office, his reputation was permanently damaged. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Second Term (cont.) (pages 899–900)
  • 66. Section 2-24 What did Clinton do to help students? Clinton asked for tax credits, a large increase in student grants, and an expansion of the Head Start program for preschoolers. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Clinton’s Second Term (cont.) (pages 899–900)
  • 67. Section 2-25 Clinton’s Foreign Policy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1991 the leader of Haiti, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, was overthrown and sought refuge in the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>The new rulers used violence to suppress the opposition. </li></ul><ul><li>Clinton convinced the United Nations to impose a trade embargo on Haiti, creating a severe economic crisis. </li></ul><ul><li>Thousands of Haitian refugees fled to the United States. </li></ul>(pages 900–901)
  • 68. Section 2-26 <ul><li>Clinton ordered an invasion of Haiti, but before troops arrived, former president Jimmy Carter convinced Haiti’s rulers to step aside. </li></ul>Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 69. Section 2-26a <ul><li>Yugoslavia split apart in 1991 after the end of communism. </li></ul><ul><li>In Bosnia, a three-way civil war began between Orthodox Christian Serbs, Catholic Croatians, and Bosnian Muslims. </li></ul><ul><li>The fighting continued until 1995. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 70. Section 2-27 <ul><li>The Serbs would not stop their attacks and began calling for ethnic cleansing –the brutal expulsion of an ethnic group from a geographic area. </li></ul><ul><li>The United States convinced NATO allies that intervention was necessary, resulting in NATO warplanes attacking Serbs. </li></ul><ul><li>The Clinton administration arranged for peace talks in Dayton, Ohio, and a peace plan was signed called the Dayton Accords. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 71. Section 2-28 <ul><li>In 1998 another war began in Kosovo between its two major ethnic groups– the Serbs and Albanians. </li></ul><ul><li>The Serbian treatment of Kosovo Albanians angered people around the world, and leaders tried to unsuccessfully bring the two sides together. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1999 NATO began bombing Serbia. </li></ul><ul><li>Serbian troops pulled out of Kosovo. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 72. Section 2-29 <ul><li>Although Iraq was defeated in the Persian Gulf War, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein remained in power, threatening Iraq’s neighbors. </li></ul><ul><li>To stop the attacks, the United States fired cruise missiles at Iraqi military targets. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 73. Section 2-30 <ul><li>Relations between Israel and the Palestinians were very volatile. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1993 Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian Liberation Organization leader Yasir Arafat reached an agreement. </li></ul><ul><li>Clinton invited them to the White House to sign the Declaration of Principles. </li></ul><ul><li>There was opposition to the plan from both sides, and in 1995 Prime Minister Rabin was assassinated. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 74. Section 2-31 <ul><li>In October 2000, violence erupted between the Palestinians and Israeli soldiers. </li></ul>Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 75. Section 2-31a <ul><li>As Clinton left office, his legacy was uncertain. </li></ul><ul><li>Although he had presided over the greatest period of economic growth in America, his presidency was marred by the impeachment trial, which divided the nation. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 76. Section 2-32 What was the Declaration of Principles? It was a plan for creating a Palestinian government. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Clinton’s Foreign Policy (cont.) (pages 900–901)
  • 77. Section 2-33 Checking for Understanding __ 1. lying when one has sworn under oath to tell the truth __ 2. the expulsion, imprisonment, or killing of ethnic minorities by a dominant majority group A. perjury B. ethnic cleansing Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. B A
  • 78. Section 2-34 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Explain why the federal government shut down in 1995. A budget impasse between Congress and Clinton led to a government shutdown.
  • 79. Section 2-35 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Economic Factors What government policies helped create the U.S. prosperity of the 1990s? A reduced federal deficit and lower interest rates helped create the U.S. prosperity of the 1990s.
  • 80. Section 2-36 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Why was President Clinton able to win re-election in 1996? President Clinton was aided by Americans’ desire to encourage the continuation of the economic boom.
  • 81. Section 2-37 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the photographs of Clinton’s impeachment trial on page 899 of your textbook. What elements in the photograph reflect the seriousness of the occasion? Possible answers: People’s somber expressions and Clinton’s bowed head reflect the somber moment.
  • 82. Section 2-38 Close Discuss the nation’s involvement in world affairs during the Clinton administration.
  • 83. End of Section 2
  • 84. Section 3-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading As the world adjusted to a new era, it faced the advantages and disadvantages of growing economic globalization and the end of the U.S.-Soviet rivalry. <ul><li>trade deficit </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>North American Free Trade Agreement </li></ul><ul><li>euro </li></ul><ul><li>nuclear proliferation </li></ul><ul><li>global warming </li></ul><ul><li>Kyoto Protocol </li></ul>
  • 85. Section 3-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Organizing Complete a graphic organizer like the one on page 902 of your textbook to chart the major political and economic problems facing the world at the turn of the century. <ul><li>Explain the development of regional economic blocs around the world. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Assess environmental issues that have become important internationally. </li></ul>
  • 86. Section 3-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Global Connections Economic, health, and environmental developments in recent years have led to the world’s nations becoming more interdependent.
  • 87. Section 3-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 88. Section 3-5 A New Global Economy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In the latter part of the 1900s, computer technology and the Internet helped to create a global economy. </li></ul><ul><li>The sale of American-made goods abroad had been essential to American prosperity. </li></ul><ul><li>By the 1970s, however, there was a serious increase in trade deficits –Americans purchased more from foreign nations than American industry and agriculture sold abroad. </li></ul>(pages 902–904)
  • 89. Section 3-6 <ul><li>In 1994 the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was created to increase international trade. </li></ul><ul><li>Canada, the United States, and Mexico joined in a free-trade zone. </li></ul><ul><li>American manufacturers increased trade with Canada and Mexico. </li></ul>A New Global Economy (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 902–904)
  • 90. Section 3-7 <ul><li>In 1993 the European Union (EU) was created to promote economic and political cooperation among European nations. </li></ul><ul><li>The EU formed a common bank and the euro, a common currency for member nations. </li></ul><ul><li>The organization lifted barriers to trade between European nations and set policies on imports from nations outside the community. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. A New Global Economy (cont.) (pages 902–904)
  • 91. Section 3-8 <ul><li>The Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was an attempt to create a Pacific trade community to rival the European Union. </li></ul><ul><li>However, political differences kept its members from working together. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. A New Global Economy (cont.) (pages 902–904)
  • 92. Section 3-9 <ul><li>The World Trade Organization (WTO) administered international trade agreements and helped settle trade disputes. </li></ul><ul><li>American supporters of WTO felt it would benefit consumers. </li></ul><ul><li>The opposition felt it left no veto power to the United States and poorer nations could outvote it. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. A New Global Economy (cont.) (pages 902–904)
  • 93. Section 3-9a <ul><li>China became important in world trade. </li></ul><ul><li>Although many Americans were uneasy about China’s history of human rights abuses and its threats to invade Taiwan, Clinton negotiated a new trade agreement. </li></ul><ul><li>There was also a fear that low-cost goods from China would flood the American market. </li></ul><ul><li>The bill passed in October 2000, despite opposition, and in 2001 China joined the WTO. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. A New Global Economy (cont.) (pages 902–904)
  • 94. Section 3-10 Why were Democrat and Republican administrations in favor of lowering international trade barriers? They thought that the U.S. economy benefited from the sale of American exports, and that the purchase of imports would keep consumer prices, inflation, and interest rates low for Americans. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. A New Global Economy (cont.) (pages 902–904)
  • 95. Section 3-11 Issues of Global Concern Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During the 1980s, nations began to be concerned about the environment. </li></ul><ul><li>To help stop nuclear proliferation, or the spread of nuclear weapons to new nations, Congress passed legislation that cut off foreign aid and imposed sanctions on nations looking to acquire nuclear weapons. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2002 Treaty of Moscow aimed to reduce the U.S. and Russia’s nuclear weapons. </li></ul>(pages 904–905)
  • 96. Section 3-11 Issues of Global Concern Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The U.S. and the EU demanded that Iran and North Korea undergo close scrutiny to ensure their nuclear energy programs do not lead to the production of nuclear weapons. </li></ul><ul><li>Many environmental activists began to push for a ban on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) because these chemicals had the potential to deplete the earth’s ozone. </li></ul>(pages 904–905)
  • 97. Section 3-12 <ul><li>Ozone protects life on Earth from the cancer-causing ultraviolet rays of the sun. </li></ul><ul><li>In the early 1990s, some scientists found evidence of global warming –an increase in average world temperatures over time. </li></ul>Issues of Global Concern (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 904–905)
  • 98. Section 3-13 <ul><li>Concern about global warming led to an international meeting in Kyoto, Japan, in 1997. </li></ul><ul><li>Thirty-eight nations and the EU signed the Kyoto Protocol promising to reduce emissions. </li></ul><ul><li>Few countries put the protocol into effect. </li></ul><ul><li>The United States withdrew from the treaty in 2001. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Issues of Global Concern (cont.) (pages 904–905)
  • 99. Section 3-14 Why did the Senate refuse to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty? The Senate felt that it would limit American nuclear research. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Issues of Global Concern (cont.) (pages 904–905)
  • 100. Section 3-15 Checking for Understanding __ 1. an increase in average world temperatures over time __ 2. the difference between the value of a country’s imports versus its exports __ 3. the basic currency shared by the countries of the European Union since 1999 __ 4. the spread of nuclear weapons to new nations A. euro B. nuclear proliferation C. global warming D. trade deficit Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. D A C B
  • 101. Section 3-16 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Describe the international response to concerns about global warming. The Kyoto Protocol pledged to reduce emissions, but the United States did not sign it. Few of the 39 countries that signed it have implemented any plans.
  • 102. Section 3-17 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Global Connections Why was China an important factor in world trade? China’s large population provides a huge market for imported goods.
  • 103. Section 3-18 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Do you think the new global economy has helped or hurt the United States? Answers will vary.
  • 104. Section 3-19 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the photograph of the Oklahoma City National Memorial on page 904 of your textbook. What do the empty chairs represent? How has the memorial helped relatives of the victims? The chairs represent bombing victims. The memorial emphasizes the need to remember the victims of the tragedy.
  • 105. Section 3-20 Close List the environmental issues that have become important internationally.
  • 106. End of Section 3
  • 107. Section 4-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading The closest presidential election in American history served as the prelude to the new century. The new president initiated an ambitious program. <ul><li>Al Gore </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>George W. Bush </li></ul><ul><li>Ralph Nader </li></ul><ul><li>chad </li></ul><ul><li>strategic defense </li></ul>
  • 108. Section 4-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Organizing As you read about the 2000 presidential election, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 906 of your textbook by charting the key post-election events culminating in George W. Bush’s victory. <ul><li>Describe the unusual circumstances surrounding the outcome of the 2000 presidential election. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Evaluate the programs President George W. Bush initiated. </li></ul>
  • 109. Section 4-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Government and Democracy The 2000 presidential election was very close, and the outcome was controversial.
  • 110. Section 4-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 111. Section 4-5 A New President for a New Century Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>The election of 2000 was historically close. </li></ul><ul><li>Vice President Al Gore was the Democratic candidate. </li></ul><ul><li>The Republican candidate was George W. Bush, son of former President George Bush. </li></ul><ul><li>Each candidate battled for the undecided independent voters. </li></ul>(pages 906–909)
  • 112. Section 4-6 <ul><li>Both candidates promised to cut taxes, and made education and health care central issues in their campaigns. </li></ul><ul><li>Ralph Nader of the Green Party was the only major challenge to the party candidates. </li></ul>A New President for a New Century (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 906–909)
  • 113. Section 4-7 <ul><li>On election day, voters split almost evenly. </li></ul><ul><li>The election came down to the state of Florida. </li></ul><ul><li>The results in Florida were so close that state law required a recount of the ballots using vote-counting machines. </li></ul><ul><li>The machines threw out thousands of ballots because they could not determine a vote for president, so Gore asked for a hand recount. </li></ul>A New President for a New Century (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 906–909)
  • 114. Section 4-8 <ul><li>Vote counters tried to determine what voters intended, and different counties used different standards. </li></ul><ul><li>When it became clear that not all of the recounts would be finished on time, Gore went to court to overturn the deadline. </li></ul><ul><li>The Florida Supreme Court set a new deadline for completion of the recounts. </li></ul>A New President for a New Century (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 906–909)
  • 115. Section 4-9 <ul><li>The United States Supreme Court overturned the Florida Supreme Court decision to extend the deadline, and George W. Bush was named president. </li></ul>A New President for a New Century (cont.) (pages 906–909)
  • 116. Section 4-10 What were the campaign issues of the 2000 presidential election? Both Gore and Bush proposed tax cuts, although Bush emphasized much larger tax cuts. Both candidates agreed that Social Security needed reform. Both candidates promised to improve education and supported plans to help seniors pay for prescription drugs. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. A New President for a New Century (cont.) (pages 906–909)
  • 117. Section 4-11 Bush Becomes President Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>During the 2000 election campaign, the U.S. economy began to slow. </li></ul><ul><li>The stock market dropped, and many Internet-based technology companies went out of business. </li></ul><ul><li>President Bush’s first priority in office was to cut taxes to boost the economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Congress passed a large tax cut. </li></ul><ul><li>Congress passed education bills requiring states to conduct annual reading and math tests for all public school children in grades 3–8. </li></ul>(page 909)
  • 118. Section 4-12 <ul><li>President Bush wanted to reform Medicare. In November 2003 Congress passed a bill that added prescription drug benefits to Medicare. </li></ul><ul><li>Congress also reacted to a rash of corporate scandals, tightening accounting regulations and increasing the penalties for dishonest corporate executives. </li></ul>Bush Becomes President (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 909)
  • 119. Section 4-12 <ul><li>Bush called for a new military program designed to meet the needs of the post-Cold War world. </li></ul><ul><li>He strongly favored strategic defense – the effort to develop missiles and other devices that can shoot down nuclear missiles before they hit the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>On September 11, 2001, terrorists struck the United States, and the event changed everything. </li></ul>Bush Becomes President (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 909)
  • 120. Section 4-13 What were Bush’s major domestic programs when he first took office? Bush cut taxes, proposed mandatory testing in public schools, and Medicare reform, and favored building up missile defense. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Bush Becomes President (cont.) (page 909)
  • 121. Section 4-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Checking for Understanding __ 1. a plan to develop missiles and other devices that can shoot down nuclear missiles before they hit the United States __ 2. a small piece of cardboard produced by punching a data card A. chad B. strategic defense Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. A B
  • 122. Section 4-14a Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Checking for Understanding (cont.) Reviewing Facts What did the Supreme Court decide in Bush v. Gore? The Supreme Court decided that there was not enough time to conduct a manual recount that passed constitutional standards, ensuring Bush’s victory.
  • 123. Section 4-15 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Government and Democracy What caused the vote-count controversy in Florida in the 2000 election? Confusing ballot designs and unclear voting results, combined with different standards used to manually recount ballots, caused the vote-count controversy.
  • 124. Section 4-16 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Forming an Opinion Do you think the 2000 presidential election was decided fairly? Why or why not? Answers will vary.
  • 125. Section 4-17 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting Graphs Study the graph on page 907 of your textbook. By how many votes was Gore leading when news networks declared him the winner in Florida? What was Bush’s lead when networks declared him to be the winner? Gore led by about 3,000 votes when news networks declared him the winner in Florida. Bush led by about 45,000 votes when he was declared the winner.
  • 126. Section 4-18 Close Evaluate the programs President George W. Bush initiated.
  • 127. End of Section 4
  • 128. Section 5-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading After suffering the worst terrorist attack in its history when airplanes crashed into the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, the United States launched a massive effort to end international terrorism. <ul><li>terrorism </li></ul>Main Idea Key Terms and Names <ul><li>state-sponsored terrorism </li></ul><ul><li>Osama bin Laden </li></ul><ul><li>al-Qaeda </li></ul><ul><li>anthrax </li></ul>
  • 129. Section 5-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy As you read about America’s war on terrorism, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 911 of your textbook to show the different reasons terrorists attack Americans. <ul><li>Describe the development of Middle East terrorism. </li></ul>Reading Objectives <ul><li>Explain the response of the United States to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. </li></ul>
  • 130. Section 5-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Global Connections International terrorists targeted Americans in order to coerce the United States.
  • 131. Section 5-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 132. Section 5-5 September 11, 2001 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>On September 11, 2001, hijackers seized four passenger jets in the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>Two of the jets were deliberately crashed into the towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. </li></ul><ul><li>Another jet crashed into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. </li></ul><ul><li>A fourth jet crashed when some of the passengers resisted the hijacking, causing the jet to crash in western Pennsylvania. </li></ul>(pages 911–913)
  • 133. Section 5-6 <ul><li>Thousands of people died in these acts of terrorism –the use of violence by nongovernmental groups against civilians to achieve a political goal. </li></ul>September 11, 2001 (cont.) <ul><li>Middle Eastern groups have carried out most terrorist attacks on the United States. </li></ul>(pages 911–913)
  • 134. Section 5-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Oil became important to the American economy in the 1920s, so the United States invested in the oil industry in the Middle East. </li></ul><ul><li>Some Middle Easterners became angry at the United States for helping ruling families in some Middle Eastern kingdoms to become very wealthy, while most of the people remained poor. </li></ul>September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 135. Section 5-8 <ul><li>The growth of the oil industry increased the Middle East’s contact with Western society. </li></ul><ul><li>Western ideas spread through the region, and devout Muslims feared their traditional values and beliefs were being weakened. </li></ul><ul><li>Throughout the Middle East, new movements arose calling for a return to traditional Muslim religious laws and a strict interpretation of the Quran–the Muslim holy book. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 136. Section 5-9 <ul><li>The movements also sought to overthrow pro-Western governments in the Middle East and to establish a pure Islamic society. </li></ul><ul><li>Muslims who support these movements are called fundamentalist militants. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Muslims believe terrorism is against their faith. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 137. Section 5-10 <ul><li>American support of Israel angered many in the Middle East. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1947 the UN divided Palestine into two territories–one part became Israel, the other part was supposed to be a Palestinian state. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead, fighting between Israel and Arab states left this territory under control of Israel, Jordan, and Egypt. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 138. Section 5-11 <ul><li>In the 1950s, Palestinians began holding guerrilla raids and terrorist attacks against Israel. </li></ul><ul><li>The United States became a target because it gave military and economic aid to Israel. </li></ul><ul><li>The governments of Libya, Syria, Iraq, and Iran have secretly supported state-sponsored terrorism. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 139. Section 5-12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>In 1979 Osama bin Laden, a wealthy Saudi Arabian, joined the struggle in Afghanistan against the Soviet Union’s invasion of the country. </li></ul><ul><li>He used his wealth to support the Afghan resistance, and in 1988 he founded al-Qaeda, or “the Base.” </li></ul><ul><li>This organization recruited Muslims and channeled money and arms to the Afghan resistance. </li></ul>September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 140. Section 5-13 <ul><li>Bin Laden believed Western ideas had contaminated Muslim society. </li></ul><ul><li>He was outraged when Saudi Arabia allowed American troops on Saudi soil when Iraq invaded Kuwait. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1998 he issued a statement calling on Muslims to kill Americans. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 141. Section 5-14 <ul><li>In 1998, after simultaneous bombings of American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, the United States began air strikes against training bases connected with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan and Sudan. </li></ul><ul><li>In October 2000, terrorists attacked the USS Cole, an American warship, while it was docked in the Middle Eastern country of Yemen. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 142. Section 5-15 What do terrorists hope to accomplish when they commit terrorist acts? Terrorists hope to instill fear in people, and to frighten their governments into changing policies. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. September 11, 2001 (cont.) (pages 911–913)
  • 143. Section 5-16 America Unites Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>When terrorists attacked the United States on September 11, 2001, Americans responded rapidly to the crisis by donating money, blood, and supplies. </li></ul><ul><li>Across the nation, flags were flown to show unity and resolve. </li></ul><ul><li>The American government put the armed forces on high alert. Airport security greatly increased. </li></ul>(pages 913–914)
  • 144. Section 5-17 <ul><li>The FBI began a massive investigation, which soon identified the attacks as the work of Osama bin Laden and the al-Qaeda network. </li></ul><ul><li>On September 14, President Bush declared a national emergency, and Congress voted to use force to fight the terrorists. </li></ul>America Unites (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 913–914)
  • 145. Section 5-18 <ul><li>President Bush announced that the war on terrorism would start against al-Qaeda, but would also be waged against every terrorist group around the globe, including states that aided or harbored terrorists. </li></ul>America Unites (cont.) (pages 913–914)
  • 146. Section 5-19 How did President Bush respond to the terrorist attacks against the United States? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. America Unites (cont.) (pages 913–914)
  • 147. Section 5-20 On September 14, President Bush declared a national emergency, and Congress voted to use force to fight the terrorists. Secretary of State Colin Powell built an international coalition to support the United States’ fight against terrorism. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and the joint chiefs of staff deployed American troops, aircrafts, and warships to the Middle East. President Bush announced that the war on terrorism would start against al-Qaeda, but would also be waged against every terrorist group around the globe, including states that aided or harbored terrorists. America Unites (cont.) (pages 913–914)
  • 148. Section 5-21 A New War Begins Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. <ul><li>Congress drafted a new antiterrorist law, known as the USA Patriot Act, in late October 2001. </li></ul>(pages 914–916) <ul><li>It permitted secret searches and allowed authorities to obtain a single nationwide search warrant. </li></ul><ul><li>It also made it easier to wiretap suspects, and allowed authorities to track Internet communications and seize voice mail. </li></ul>
  • 149. Section 5-22 <ul><li>President Bush asked Congress to combine all the agencies working to prevent terrorism into the Department of Homeland Security. </li></ul>A New War Begins (cont.) (pages 914–916)
  • 150. Section 5-23 <ul><li>Terrorists posed a new threat when they began to use the mail to spread anthrax, a type of bacteria that can become lethal if left untreated. </li></ul><ul><li>Several occurrences of anthrax were found, but no suspects were publicly recognized. </li></ul>A New War Begins (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 914–916)
  • 151. Section 5-24 <ul><li>On October 7, 2001, the United States launched the first military operations of the war on terrorism. </li></ul><ul><li>Warplanes began bombing targets in Afghanistan. </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. also began sending military aid to a coalition of Afghan groups known as the Northern Alliance, who had been fighting the Taliban for several years. </li></ul>A New War Begins (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 914–916)
  • 152. Section 5-25 <ul><li>By early December, the Taliban government had collapsed. Thousands of American allied troops arrived in Afghanistan to act as peacekeepers and to hunt for al-Qaeda terrorists. </li></ul><ul><li>The September 11, 2001, attacks led to fears that al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups could acquire weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons), which could kill tens of thousands of people all at once. </li></ul>A New War Begins (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 914–916)
  • 153. Section 5-26 <ul><li>In January 2002, President Bush warned of the grave threat to the world posed by Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. </li></ul><ul><li>All three countries had sponsored terrorists and were suspected of developing weapons of mass destruction. </li></ul>A New War Begins (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 914–916) <ul><li>In October 2002, North Korea announced that it had resumed its nuclear weapons program. The Bush administration was not able to persuade North Korea to stop the program. </li></ul>
  • 154. Section 5-27 Why did Congress need time to draft the antiterrorist bill? Congress struggled over how to balance Americans’ Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure with the need to increase security. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. A New War Begins (cont.) (pages 914–916)
  • 155. Section 5-28 <ul><li>President Bush considered Iraq a more immediate threat than North Korea in developing and distributing weapons of mass destruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Iraq’s dictator, Saddam Hussein, had used chemical weapons twice in the 1980s, and after the Gulf War, UN inspectors had found evidence that Iraq had biological weapons and was working on a nuclear bomb. </li></ul>Confronting Iraq Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 916)
  • 156. Section 5-29 <ul><li>In the summer of 2002, President Bush called for regime change in Iraq. He asked the UN to support a war against Iraq and to demand that Iraq give up its weapons of mass destruction. </li></ul><ul><li>While the UN was still debating the issue, in mid-October Congress authorized the use of force against Iraq. </li></ul>Confronting Iraq (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 916)
  • 157. Section 5-30 <ul><li>Weapons inspectors returned to Iraq. The Bush Administration believed that Saddam Hussein had hidden the weapons of mass destruction. Bush also believed Hussein had ties to al-Qaeda. The Bush administration pushed for a war resolution in the UN Security Council. </li></ul>Confronting Iraq (cont.) (page 916)
  • 158. Section 5-31 <ul><li>He argued that a preemptive war was justified because of the imminent threat posed by Iraq. France and Russia refused to back it, but the United States and about 30 other countries prepared for war as many antiwar protests took place around the world. </li></ul>Confronting Iraq (cont.) (page 916)
  • 159. Section 5-32 <ul><li>On March 20, 2003, the U.S.-led coalition forces attacked Iraq and quickly seized control. On May 1 President Bush declared that the major combat was over. </li></ul><ul><li>However, the fighting and controversy continued. Americans found no evidence of weapons of mass destruction, and no serious link between Saddam Hussein and al-Qaeda was ever uncovered. American deaths and expenses were mounting. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Confronting Iraq (cont.) (page 916)
  • 160. Section 5-33 <ul><li>President Bush began to seek support from the UN to help stabilize and rebuild Iraq. The path toward a free, stable Iraq was proving to be long and difficult. </li></ul>Confronting Iraq (cont.) (page 916) <ul><li>The drafting of Iraq’s constitution exposed divisions within the country. The Kurds and Shiite Muslims supported a draft proposing a new federal structure that would decentralize Iraq’s government while the Sunnis believed federalism would greatly reduce their influence. </li></ul>
  • 161. Section 5-34 Why did President Bush consider Iraq to be an immediate threat for weapons of mass destruction? Iraq’s dictator, Saddam Hussein, had used chemical weapons twice in the 1980s, and after the Gulf War, UN inspectors had found evidence that Iraq had biological weapons and was working on a nuclear bomb. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Confronting Iraq (cont.) (page 916)
  • 162. Section 5-35 <ul><li>The war on terrorism and the war in Iraq dominated the election of 2004 between the Republican Bush-Cheney ticket and the Democratic nominees, Massachusetts senator John Kerry and North Carolina senator John Edwards. </li></ul>The 2004 Elections (pages 916–918)
  • 163. Section 5-36 <ul><li>The Vietnam War became a campaign issue. Bush and Cheney did not serve in Vietnam. Kerry volunteered for service and was decorated for valor, but his experiences made him an outspoken critic who was leery of sending American troops into combat. </li></ul>The 2004 Elections (cont.) (pages 916–918)
  • 164. Section 5-37 <ul><li>Bush and Kerry offered voters a sharp choice. </li></ul>The 2004 Elections (cont.) (pages 916–918) <ul><li>Bush, a conservative, pledged to cut taxes, build a strong national defense, and was opposed to abortion and same-sex marriages. His supporters saw him as someone who operated on fixed moral and religious principles, trusted his instincts, and followed through on his decisions. </li></ul>
  • 165. Section 5-37 <ul><li>Senator Kerry, a liberal, wanted to strengthen Social Security and raise taxes on the wealthiest in order to fund health care coverage for millions. He criticized what he considered President Bush’s single-mindedness. </li></ul>The 2004 Elections (cont.) (pages 916–918) <ul><li>Bush’s supporters were in the Southeast, Southwest, rural areas, and outer suburbs. </li></ul><ul><li>Kerry’s supporters were in the Northeast, West Coast, cities, and inner suburbs. </li></ul>
  • 166. Section 5-38 <ul><li>President Bush took the lead in the popular vote and a majority in the Electoral College. His victory helped preserve the Republican majorities in the Senate and House of Representatives. </li></ul>Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The 2004 Elections (cont.) (pages 916–918)
  • 167. Section 5-39 Why was John Kerry against sending American troops into combat in Iraq? Kerry had served in the navy during the Vietnam War where he was convinced that war is futile. He became an outspoken critic and was skeptical of risking American lives for the war in Iraq. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The 2004 Elections (cont.) (pages 916–918)
  • 168. Section 5-40 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Checking for Understanding __ 1. the use of violence by non-governmental groups against civilians to achieve a political goal by instilling fear and frightening governments into changing policies __ 2. violent acts against civilians that are secretly supported by a government in order to attack other nations without going to war A. terrorism B. state-sponsored terrorism Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. B A
  • 169. Section 5-41 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Explain how the United States responded to the attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. Citizens donated money and supplies. The government vowed to end terrorism and targeted al-Qaeda and the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.
  • 170. Section 5-42 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Global Connections Why does American foreign policy anger Islamic fundamentalists in the Middle East? U.S. support for Israel and for wealthy ruling families in some Middle Eastern countries angers Islamic fundamentalists.
  • 171. Section 5-43 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting What factors have contributed to the rise of Middle Eastern terrorist groups? Increased contact with Western society, the growth of Islamic fundamentalism, and countries that provide terrorists with money, weapons, and training are factors that contribute to the rise of Middle Eastern terrorist groups.
  • 172. Section 5-44 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Examining Maps Study the map of terrorist attacks on page 914 of your textbook. In what region of the world did most of the attacks take place? The most attacks have taken place in the Middle East.
  • 173. Section 5-45 Close Explain America’s response to the terrorist attacks on New York and the Pentagon.
  • 174. End of Section 5
  • 175. Chapter Summary 1
  • 176. End of Chapter Summary
  • 177. Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 1. the difference between the value of a country’s imports versus its exports __ 2. to work at home by means of an electronic linkup with a central office __ 3. the spread of nuclear weapons to new nations __ 4. a plan to develop missiles and other devices that can shoot down nuclear missiles before they hit the United States __ 5. lying when one has sworn under oath to tell the truth A. microprocessor B. telecommute C. perjury D. ethnic cleansing E. trade deficit F. euro G. nuclear proliferation H. global warming I. chad J. strategic defense B G E J C
  • 178. Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms (cont.) Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 6. a computer processor containing both memory and computing functions on a single chip __ 7. the basic currency shared by the countries of the European Union since 1999 __ 8. the expulsion, imprisonment, or killing of ethnic minorities by a dominant majority group __ 9. a small piece of cardboard produced by punching a data card __ 10. an increase in average world temperatures over time F D A I H A. microprocessor B. telecommute C. perjury D. ethnic cleansing E. trade deficit F. euro G. nuclear proliferation H. global warming I. chad J. strategic defense
  • 179. Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts How did compact computers transform the workplace? Compact computers connected employees in offices together, modernized record-keeping, increased productivity, and streamlined research avenues.
  • 180. Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What advances in biotechnology occurred in the 1990s? The mapping of the human genome made it possible to study and manipulate genes and cells at the molecular level. Other advances resulted in new medicines, animal growth hormones, new industrial chemicals, and genetically engineered plants.
  • 181. Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) After his election in 1992, how did President Clinton propose to strengthen the nation’s economy? Clinton proposed to strengthen the economy by lowering interest rates and reducing federal deficits.
  • 182. Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What regional trade blocks were formed in the 1990s to increase international trade? The North American Free Trade Agreement, the European Union, and the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation were formed to increase international trade.
  • 183. Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) Which state was significant in the 2000 presidential election? The outcome in Florida determined the winner of the election of 2000.
  • 184. Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Analyzing Themes: Global Connections What foreign-policy challenges did President Clinton face? Do you think he handled the situations effectively? Why or why not? Foreign policy challenges included restoring Haiti’s president, ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and Kosovo, and ongoing tensions in the Middle East. Evaluations of Clinton’s effectiveness should be supported with examples and sound reasoning.
  • 185. Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking (cont.) Evaluating What developments in the Middle East explain the rise of terrorist groups that want to attack Americans? Developments include American support for Israel, American investment in the oil industry in the Middle East, and the belief of some Muslims that American support of wealthy oil-producing countries increased Western influence and undermined traditional values and beliefs.
  • 186. Chapter Assessment 10 Geography and History The graph on page 921 of your textbook shows the diverse population of the United States at the beginning of the new century. Study the graph and answer the questions on the following slides.
  • 187. Chapter Assessment 11 Interpreting Graphs Why is getting accurate data on the Hispanic population difficult? Some Hispanics would classify themselves in the Other or Multiracial categories. Geography and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 188. Chapter Assessment 12 Geography and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Making Generalizations How will population diversity affect government in the future? Answers will vary.
  • 189. Chapter Assessment 13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Directions: Choose the phrase that best completes the following sentence. The Contract with America involved F a commitment by Russia to eliminate land-based nuclear weapons. G a campaign promise by President Clinton to create a national health care system for all Americans. H a legislative agenda promoted by the Republican Party in 1994. J programs intended to increase the size and readiness of the military. Test-Taking Tip This question requires that you remember details of a specific program. Use the process of elimination if you are unsure. Does the Contract with America sound like a foreign policy agreement between two countries?
  • 190. Chapter Assessment 14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Who were the Democratic and Republican presidential and vice presidential candidates in 2000? The Democratic candidates were Al Gore and Joseph Lieberman. The Republican candidates were George W. Bush and Richard Cheney.
  • 191. End of Chapter Assessment
  • 192. FYI Contents 2 Bill Clinton Madeleine Albright Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
  • 193. FYI 2-1a William Jefferson Blythe IV was born in Hope, Arkansas, three months after his father died in a traffic accident. While in high school, Blythe took his stepfather’s last name of Clinton. Bill Clinton graduated from Georgetown University and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University. At Yale University, he earned a law degree and met his future wife, law school classmate Hilary Rodham. After serving as the attorney general and governor of Arkansas, Clinton ran for president. His 1992 campaign video was titled “A Man from Hope.”
  • 194. FYI 2-2b Madeleine Albright, appointed by President Clinton, was the first woman to serve as secretary of state. This appointment made her the highest-ranking woman ever to serve in the federal government–fourth in line for presidential succession. Interestingly, she would not have been able to assume the presidency because she was not born a citizen of the United States.
  • 195. FYI Contents 5 The Pentagon American Red Cross Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
  • 196. FYI 5-1a Construction on the Pentagon began on September 11, 1941, exactly 60 years before terrorists attacked.
  • 197. FYI 5-2b The American Red Cross, one of the leading relief agencies assisting victims of the terrorist attacks, came under fire when it announced that some of the money donated to the Liberty Fund would not be used for the relief effort surrounding the 2001 terrorist attacks. Criticized for misleading the public, the Red Cross launched a public relations campaign to reassure the public that all the money donated to the Liberty Fund would be used to help victims of the September 11 attacks.
  • 198. Moment in History 3 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 199. You Don’t Say 4-1 Name Game Traditionally former presidents retain the title of “president.” George W. Bush and his father, however, are both called President Bush. Some Bush family members affectionately call the men “41” and “43,” because George Bush was the forty-first president and George W. Bush was the forty-third president.
  • 200. You Don’t Say 5-1 Taliban The Taliban claimed to be Allah’s followers desiring to bring pure Islamic government to Afghanistan. Some of their earlier successes in ending corruption and in dealing with cruel warlords won them much support in Afghanistan. However, as their control of the country became more complete, their repressive regime greatly burdened the people of Afghanistan, who were already weary from nearly 20 years of war.
  • 201. SS Skill Builder 1 Reading a Cartogram On most maps, land areas are drawn in proportion to their actual surface areas on the earth. On some maps, however, a small country may appear much larger than usual, and a large country may look much smaller. The shapes of the countries may also look different. Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • 202. SS Skill Builder 2 Learning the Skill Maps that distort country size and shape are called cartograms. In a cartogram, country size reflects some value other than land area, such as population or gross national product. For example, on a conventional map, Canada appears much larger than India. In a cartogram showing world population, however, India would appear larger than Canada because it has a much larger population. The cartogram is a tool for making visual comparisons. At a glance, you can see how each country or region compares with another in a particular value. Reading a Cartogram
  • 203. SS Skill Builder 3 Learning the Skill (cont.) To use a cartogram, first read the title and key to identify what value the cartogram illustrates. Then examine the cartogram to see which countries or regions appear. Find the largest and smallest countries. Compare the cartogram with a conventional land-area map to determine the degree of distortion of particular countries. Finally, draw conclusions about the topic. Reading a Cartogram
  • 204. SS Skill Builder 4 Practicing the Skill Study the cartogram shown on page 910 of your textbook, then answer the questions on the following slides. Reading a Cartogram
  • 205. SS Skill Builder 5 1. What is the subject of the cartogram? 2. Which region appears largest on the cartogram? Which appears smallest? The subject of the cartogram is population density. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. The Northeast appears largest, and the West appears smallest. Reading a Cartogram Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  • 206. SS Skill Builder 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. 3. Compare the cartogram to the map of the United States found in the Atlas. Which region is the most distorted in size compared to a land-area map? 4. Provide a brief explanation for this distortion. The West is the most distorted in size. Population density is low in much of the West. Reading a Cartogram Practicing the Skill (cont.)
  • 207. M/C 4-1
  • 208. M/C 4 contents The Florida Election, 2000 The Election of 2000 Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.
  • 209. M/C 4-1a
  • 210. M/C 4-2b
  • 211. M/C 5-1
  • 212. Technology and History 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 213. Why It Matters Transparency
  • 214. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 215. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 216. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 217. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 218. Daily Focus Skills Transparency 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • 219. GO 1
  • 220. GO 2
  • 221. GO 3
  • 222. GO 4
  • 223. GO 5
  • 224. HELP To navigate within this Presentation Plus! product: Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Section Back button to return to the beginning of the section you are in. If you are viewing a feature, this button returns you to the main presentation. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Help button to access this screen. Click the Speaker button to listen to available audio. Click the Speaker Off button to stop any playing audio. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Click the Maps and Chart button in the top right corner of many slides to link to relevant In-Motion and static maps and charts. Presentation Plus! features such as the Reference Atlas , History Online , and others are located in the left margin of most screens. Click on any of these buttons to access a specific feature.
  • 225. End of Custom Shows End of Custom Shows WARNING! Do Not Remove This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.
  • 226. End of Slide Show

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