Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
When In Disgrace William Shakespeare
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

When In Disgrace William Shakespeare

3,650
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,650
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
68
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SONNET XXIX “ When, in disgrace with fortune…”
  • 2. Revision of the Sonnet Form SHAKESPEARE IN ENGLAND PETRARCH IN ITALY
  • 3. Both use 14 lines SHAKESPEAREAN PETRACHAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 QUATRAIN 1 2 3 RHYMING COUPLE T OCTAVE SESTET “ VOLTA” TURNING POINT QUAD = 4 QUARTER QUARTET QUAD OCT = 8 OCTOPUS SES = 6
  • 4. Rhythm
    • A sonnet is written in iambic pentameter
    Each line contains ten rhythmic beats (syllables) “ Let me not to the marriage of true minds” An “iamb” or one “foot” consists of two beats “ Penta” = five: each line has five feet
  • 5. Rhythm
    • A sonnet is written in iambic pentameter
    “ Let me not to the mar riage of true minds” Each foot consists of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable – this produced the characteristic rhythm of the line U U U U U / / / / /
  • 6. Rhyme Scheme Shakespearean Sonnet Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea , But sad mortality o'er-sways their power , How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea , Whose action is no stronger than a flower ? O, how shall summer's honey breath hold out Against the wreckful siege of battering days , When rocks impregnable are not so stout , Nor gates of steel so strong, but Time decays ? O fearful meditation! where, alack , Shall Time's best jewel from Time's chest lie hid ? Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back ? Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid ? O, none, unless this miracle have might , That in black ink my love may still shine bright . A B A B C D C D E F E F G G
  • 7. Rhyme Scheme Petrarchan Sonnet
    • Fourteen small broidered berries on the hem
    • Of Circe’s mantle, each of magic gold ;
    • Fourteen of lone Calypso’s tears that rolled
    • Into the sea, for pearls to come of them ;
    • Fourteen clear signs of omen in the gem
    • With which Medea human fate foretold ;
    • Fourteen small drops, which Faustus, growing old ,
    • Craved of the Fiend, to water Life’s dry stem .
    • It is the pure white diamond Dante brought
    • To Beatrice; the sapphire Laura wore
    • When Petrarch cut it sparkling out of thought ;
    • The ruby Shakespeare hewed from his heart’s core ;
    • The dark, deep emerald that Rossetti wrought
    • For his own soul, to wear for evermore .
    A B B A A B B A C D C D C D
  • 8. XXIX. When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;   For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings   That then I scorn to change my state with kings.
  • 9. When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate, Out of favour with fate/chance/destiny Bringing no advantage… Useless TONE? PERSONIFICATION Relationship with God? OUTCAST: lonesome figure in relation to himself, society, fate and God Social standing and opinion Popularity and Reputation PERSONIFICATION OF FORTUNE FEELINGS OF ISOLATION, DEPRESSION, REJECTION AND LONELINESS – SOCIAL, SPIRITUAL AND EMOTIONAL Depressed Self-pity Self-loathing Self-rejection Despondent
  • 10. When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate, Searching for an explanation of his emotional state Notice all the words suggesting negativity
  • 11. Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; With the same facial features Having/possessing as many friends Compares himself to others…wishes that he could have more hope…feels cheated and depressed…jealousy/envy…covets the attributes and abilities of others DEPRESSED ABILITY SKILL IRONY: finds himself most dissatisfied with that which he usually enjoys most RANGE OF ABILITIES OR SKILLS, TALENTS Envy and discontent increase to overpowering mood of personal worthlessness and self contempt
  • 12. Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; By chance…but also “happily” Small brown bird Unsmiling, sulking CONJUNCTION – marks a change in the direction of the argument CHANGE OF MOOD: experiences renewed joy and optimism SIMILE And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries He is mature enough to recognise theses feelings as jealousy and despises himself for having these feelings Connotations of renewal, rebirth, new beginnings and new hope Lark – first bird to sing at break of day – flies extremely high and sings – lark song is also figurative - symbolic of poets soaring emotional state and state of mind Contrast and movement suggest a new mood of elation
  • 13.    For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings    That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Dismiss / treat with contempt CONJUNCTION – introduces conclusion to argument
    • Notice how the mood changes
    • Starts out feeling depressed – becomes ecstatically happy
    Rich in love – emotional wealth
  • 14. I all alone beweep my outcast state Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising   That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Lot in life State of mind and spirit Position or condition
  • 15. Sonnet is structured around a series of contrasts: BEWEEP SULLEN EARTH TROUBLE… WITH…. BOOTLESS CRIES WISHING DESIRING DESPISING SINGS HEAVEN’S GATE SWEET LOVE REMEMBERED SCORN ARISING
  • 16. Sonnet has structural elements of both the Shakespearean and the Petrachan sonnet:
    • 3 quatrains: abab cdcd efef (one idea – 3 aspects)
    • 1 couplet: gg (conclusion with sudden twist)
    • Lines 1 – 8: depressions as a result of limitedness
    • “ Yet” – turning point
    • Lines 9 – 14: remembers lover – spiritually uplited