Irish immigration to Scotland - problems in ireland

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Irish immigration to Scotland - problems in ireland

  1. 1. Ireland in the 1800s was similar in many ways to Scotland. Both countries had problems (push factors) which forced people to move elsewhere
  2. 2. There were many reasons that Ireland in the 1800s was very poor. Like Scotland, the population had increased greatly by 1841 (doubling to 8 million in only 50 years). This meant more people to feed and find work.
  3. 3. Ireland’s economy was struggling too. The Industrial Revolution had only a small effect in Ireland, meaning less work. Many Irish had worked from producing cloth to make extra money. British factories did this at a cheaper cost.
  4. 4. There were many land problems too. Few Irish owned their own land. This meant they could be evicted or forced to pay higher rents. A growing population and new farming methods increased land demand.
  5. 5. There were government problems in Ireland too. Ireland was also mostly Catholic, and strong anti-Catholic laws still existed. Until 1829, Catholics could not buy land from a Protestant or educate their children. Until 1823, a Catholic could not become an MP.
  6. 6. In the 1800s the main crop grown in Ireland – and relied upon by the poor to eat – was the potato. Around half the people in Ireland ate only potatoes. Any lack of potatoes was a disaster for the Irish.
  7. 7. From 1845-1852 the disease blight destroyed the entire potato crop. This affected many countries, including Scotland. However Ireland was worst hit. Around 1 million people starved to death or died from diseases caused by hunger.
  8. 8. The Irish who stayed faced poverty and eviction. Other Irish went into the workhouse although still faced terrible living conditions. The life they faced made many Irish leave, sometimes to the UK or the USA.

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