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Winning the Story WarsJONAH SACHSCEO | FREE RANGE STUDIOS
Storytelling
Survival of the fittestTransmission is a webEveryone owns ideas
Survival of the richestTransmission is one to manyIdeas are proprietary
Survival of the fittestTransmission is a webEveryone owns ideas
What will survivethe landscape ofour new oral traditions?
Stories
The best brands will begreat stories
The Moral:• is the truth behind every communication• provides brand consistency• makes intuitive sense but stretches what ...
NIKEAchievement through hard work
OBAMA 2008Community
APPLESelf-Expression
The Hero
The Hero• Is not you• Is your audience• Is dissatisfied with a “broken world”• has an inner calling to livevalues
The Hero   The Mentor
The Mentor• Is your brand• gets the hero moving toward her  destiny• makes change appealing• Is a real, tangible person
Archetypes
The Hero        The Mentor     The Gift
The Gift:• is the wildcard that makes the impossible possible• is something unique, beautiful and entirely unexpected
The Hero        The Mentor     The Gift
The Brand                           AnxietyThe Consumer
Empowerment Marketing
freerange.com/StoryWarsBooklet     text “story” to 86677        @jonahsachs
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012
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Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012

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Jonah Sachs - Kurucu Ortak ve Kreatif Direktör Free Range Studios
MARKA SAVAŞLARINI KAZANMAK

Jonah Sachs - Co-founder and Creative Director Free Range Studios
WINNING THE STORY WARS: WHY THOSE WHO TELL (AND LIVE) THE BEST STORIES WILL RULE THE FUTURE

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  • For the past fewyears, we’ve seen a seemingly new concept sweep the marketing world by storm.
  • The idea, of course, is storytelling.In today’s overcrowded media landscape we’re all realizing that it’s tell great stories — or get drowned out. And that the best brands will be driven by the best storytellers.That’s why we’ve gathered from around the world. For the next couple of days, you’ll be hearing about the most cutting edge techniques for using storytelling to supercharge your marketing.And in the 20 minutes I’ve got you for, I’ll get it started by showing you a powerful and simple model to transform your entire brand into a story. But before we get to the how. Let’s talk about the why. Why has it become so urgent that we marketers become great storytellers? To understand that, we have to take a big step back in human history.
  • For all but the tiniest sliver of human history, we as a species have communicated in Oral Traditions. That’s how our brains evolved to work. Here, before the advent of writing, speakers would share their ideas with listeners -- passing ideas on from mouth to ear. If the listeners found the ideas compelling, they would pass the ideas on themselves.
  • All oral tradition societies share a few key features. First, they offer a survival of the fittest landscape. Ideas rely on audience participation to spread. If they’re not compelling enough to those who hear them, they simply die. Transmission of ideas move through webs, social networks. And while an idea is in someone’s possession, he makes it his own – changing it slightly. So ideas evolve.
  • For the last hundred years or so, of course, we turned that oral tradition on its head. The broadcast era came along and marketers faced an entirely new landscape. Now it was survival of the richest. Anyone with access to broadcast machines could get heard. We simply blasted our messages out and audiences had little choice but to listen. And they never had to make the ideas their own. They were fixed. We controlled them.
  • With the advent of social media, viral marketing, peer-to-peer communication, we all know the broadcast era is coming to an end. But what will come next? I believe our new era of communication will look so similar to oral traditions, we might call it the Digitoral Era. A new oral tradition empowered by digital tools.
  • The Digitoral Era will look just like oral traditions of the past. Once again, we will face a survival of the fittest landscape. If audiences don’t open their social networks to us, we will remain broadcasters only and our messages will be ignored. We will learn that the ideas we spread are not owned by us but by the crowd as they make them their own.
  • And if we’re entering an entirely new era, surely we’ll need new strategies to meet it. So what communications will survive this new marketing landscape? Well what kinds of communications always dominated in the oral tradition?
  • Stories.Of course we marketers have been telling stories for generations. But unlike the broadcast era where we could simply tell our stories as a single thirty-second broadcast spot, tomorrow’s stories will have to unfold over dozens of channels and through countless interactions. Our brand story may start on youtube and unfold over twitter, then in person. It may be retold and mashed up by our fans – or our detractors. In the Digitoral era, our brands themselves will have to become powerful stories starring us and our audiences.
  • In the Digitoral Era we are now entering, the best brands won’t jus tell great stories, they will be great stories. So how do we make this transition?
  • That’s what I’ve been trying to figure out for the past several years. And I began to find the answer when I looked to the timeless wisdom of Joseph Campbell. Nobody knew the oral tradition quite like this guy. He studied myths across the millennia and across the globe, looking for some pattern as to which types of stories survived. And he found what he was looking for. He called it the hero’s journey – a common theme among all cultures.
  • It’s still the foundation of many of our favorite stories. Like the Wizard of Oz.
  • Or Star Wars which was intentionally written to match its form. By understanding it, we can form our brands around it as well.
  • It goes like this. An unlikely hero, a powerless outsider, muddles through a broken world. She wants to live out her higher values but feels powerless to do so.
  • Then she meets a mentor who tells her so much more is possible. He lures her into a dangerous adventure of self-discovery
  • Then she meets a mentor who tells her so much more is possible. He lures her into a dangerous adventure of self-discovery
  • On this adventure, she confronts the evil source of the world’s brokenness.
  • She seizes a treasure with which she comes back to heal society. Campbell said this story was never about heroes kicking ass and grabbing treasure. It was always about contributing to making a better world. Audiences listened to this story and imagined themselves as the hero.
  • What is the moral of these stories that Campbell discovered?That we all can become heroes. We can mature beyond helplessness and selfishness and give something back to heal society. We all can mature and contribute something rather than wait for someone else to save us.
  • Like all stories, the Hero’s Journey places characters, setting and conflict on the surface. These are the elements any of us can see. But understanding the surface of things is rarely enough to gain true insight, right?
  • In a good story, everything on the surface is there for a strategic reason, to express the structure of the story – its moral. Well-told stories place each element to illustrate a core truth about how the universe works that audiences will believe to be true but that also stretches their knowledge of how the world works. Every character’s experience is there to support that moral. As a brand, every ad, every facebook post, every tweet can be used similarly, to support an enduring and relevant human truth the brand decides to defend.
  • Now the moral hides a layer even deeper in a story. It’s the core values the story’s based on. Stories have always been the way human beings have shared their core values. It’s why children so eagerly listen to stories– to know what their parents value. And as Campbell pointed out, the Hero’s Journey stories always point to the highest of human values. Not shallow values that marketing is so often based on – status, safety,, convenience. But heroic values – values that help us dig deep and become heroes ourselves. It turns out that even in the Broadcast Era, brands that called on our heroic potential became the most iconic. To become story-based brands, we must understand and share our core values – and live them in every interaction. They are the heart of our brand.
  • This is Annie Leonard. And through her story, I want to talk to you about the absolute necessity that everyone in this room learn to tell great stories. The moral of the story is: we all can.nie Leonard. And this is a story about the absolute necessity for our planet that we all learn to tell great stories. The moral of this story is that we all can do it. Annie spent 10 years worrying about the problems of too much stuff. She spent ten years with the data and the trash and the people behind the problem and then she decided it was time to tell the world about it. So she tried, and found nobody wanted to listen to the problems with the “Materials Economy”. And then she decided to turn it into a story, The Story of Stuff. She started forcing herself to talk about every fact, figure and problem as if it were a situation that an individual could experience – could feel and touch. She brought it down to the human scale and suddenly everyone liked it. Funders said “You should bring this to the web so everyone can see it!”:45 (:45)
  • This is Annie Leonard. And through her story, I want to talk to you about the absolute necessity that everyone in this room learn to tell great stories. The moral of the story is: we all can.nie Leonard. And this is a story about the absolute necessity for our planet that we all learn to tell great stories. The moral of this story is that we all can do it. Annie spent 10 years worrying about the problems of too much stuff. She spent ten years with the data and the trash and the people behind the problem and then she decided it was time to tell the world about it. So she tried, and found nobody wanted to listen to the problems with the “Materials Economy”. And then she decided to turn it into a story, The Story of Stuff. She started forcing herself to talk about every fact, figure and problem as if it were a situation that an individual could experience – could feel and touch. She brought it down to the human scale and suddenly everyone liked it. Funders said “You should bring this to the web so everyone can see it!”:45 (:45)
  • This is Annie Leonard. And through her story, I want to talk to you about the absolute necessity that everyone in this room learn to tell great stories. The moral of the story is: we all can.nie Leonard. And this is a story about the absolute necessity for our planet that we all learn to tell great stories. The moral of this story is that we all can do it. Annie spent 10 years worrying about the problems of too much stuff. She spent ten years with the data and the trash and the people behind the problem and then she decided it was time to tell the world about it. So she tried, and found nobody wanted to listen to the problems with the “Materials Economy”. And then she decided to turn it into a story, The Story of Stuff. She started forcing herself to talk about every fact, figure and problem as if it were a situation that an individual could experience – could feel and touch. She brought it down to the human scale and suddenly everyone liked it. Funders said “You should bring this to the web so everyone can see it!”:45 (:45)
  • Designers of products and ads have been comfortable in that roleSell explanation of ways to live through products they pushImbue products with meaningAnd love to live in that gap between reality and fictionThis is why this country has consumed more resource in last 50 years than all of humanity before Builders of consumer culture have dominated. But people are becoming deeply uncomfortable with the myths they’ve created. And this is our opportunity.Now designers of products and the designers who market those products have been comfortable for decades filling the myth gap. This is why our society, once based on the puritan values of thrift and modesty has come to consume more resources in the last 50 years than all of humanity that ever came before. Our crisis of unsustainability comes from the fact that the evangelists of consumerism have mastered mythmaking. Now I know they have more money than we do, but the man who studied myth and probably knew more about them than anyone else said that we sustainability evangelists actually have a more powerful advantage.
  • Designers of products and ads have been comfortable in that roleSell explanation of ways to live through products they pushImbue products with meaningAnd love to live in that gap between reality and fictionThis is why this country has consumed more resource in last 50 years than all of humanity before Builders of consumer culture have dominated. But people are becoming deeply uncomfortable with the myths they’ve created. And this is our opportunity.Now designers of products and the designers who market those products have been comfortable for decades filling the myth gap. This is why our society, once based on the puritan values of thrift and modesty has come to consume more resources in the last 50 years than all of humanity that ever came before. Our crisis of unsustainability comes from the fact that the evangelists of consumerism have mastered mythmaking. Now I know they have more money than we do, but the man who studied myth and probably knew more about them than anyone else said that we sustainability evangelists actually have a more powerful advantage.
  • This is Annie Leonard. And through her story, I want to talk to you about the absolute necessity that everyone in this room learn to tell great stories. The moral of the story is: we all can.nie Leonard. And this is a story about the absolute necessity for our planet that we all learn to tell great stories. The moral of this story is that we all can do it. Annie spent 10 years worrying about the problems of too much stuff. She spent ten years with the data and the trash and the people behind the problem and then she decided it was time to tell the world about it. So she tried, and found nobody wanted to listen to the problems with the “Materials Economy”. And then she decided to turn it into a story, The Story of Stuff. She started forcing herself to talk about every fact, figure and problem as if it were a situation that an individual could experience – could feel and touch. She brought it down to the human scale and suddenly everyone liked it. Funders said “You should bring this to the web so everyone can see it!”:45 (:45)
  • This is Annie Leonard. And through her story, I want to talk to you about the absolute necessity that everyone in this room learn to tell great stories. The moral of the story is: we all can.nie Leonard. And this is a story about the absolute necessity for our planet that we all learn to tell great stories. The moral of this story is that we all can do it. Annie spent 10 years worrying about the problems of too much stuff. She spent ten years with the data and the trash and the people behind the problem and then she decided it was time to tell the world about it. So she tried, and found nobody wanted to listen to the problems with the “Materials Economy”. And then she decided to turn it into a story, The Story of Stuff. She started forcing herself to talk about every fact, figure and problem as if it were a situation that an individual could experience – could feel and touch. She brought it down to the human scale and suddenly everyone liked it. Funders said “You should bring this to the web so everyone can see it!”:45 (:45)
  • Designers of products and ads have been comfortable in that roleSell explanation of ways to live through products they pushImbue products with meaningAnd love to live in that gap between reality and fictionThis is why this country has consumed more resource in last 50 years than all of humanity before Builders of consumer culture have dominated. But people are becoming deeply uncomfortable with the myths they’ve created. And this is our opportunity.Now designers of products and the designers who market those products have been comfortable for decades filling the myth gap. This is why our society, once based on the puritan values of thrift and modesty has come to consume more resources in the last 50 years than all of humanity that ever came before. Our crisis of unsustainability comes from the fact that the evangelists of consumerism have mastered mythmaking. Now I know they have more money than we do, but the man who studied myth and probably knew more about them than anyone else said that we sustainability evangelists actually have a more powerful advantage.
  • This is Annie Leonard. And through her story, I want to talk to you about the absolute necessity that everyone in this room learn to tell great stories. The moral of the story is: we all can.nie Leonard. And this is a story about the absolute necessity for our planet that we all learn to tell great stories. The moral of this story is that we all can do it. Annie spent 10 years worrying about the problems of too much stuff. She spent ten years with the data and the trash and the people behind the problem and then she decided it was time to tell the world about it. So she tried, and found nobody wanted to listen to the problems with the “Materials Economy”. And then she decided to turn it into a story, The Story of Stuff. She started forcing herself to talk about every fact, figure and problem as if it were a situation that an individual could experience – could feel and touch. She brought it down to the human scale and suddenly everyone liked it. Funders said “You should bring this to the web so everyone can see it!”:45 (:45)
  • Building brands this way offers not only a chance to tell better stories. It offers us, as marketers our own hero’s journey – a chance to create a better world. For two long, marketers have fallen back on a very different approach —
  • An inadequacy approach, casting audiences as the mindless, helpless damsel in distress and brands as the heroes guarding us against our deepest anxieties. I believe this marketing language has depressed our audiences, mocked higher purpose and built a society of consumers rather than citizens. Luckily the Digitoral Era will demand something more.
  • An Empowerment Marketing approach in which marketers and audiences partner to tell and share great stories — great stories that will build the future of marketing.
  • Annie, by turning her passion for garbage into a compelling narrative, had entered what I call the Story Wars, the hidden battle for myth and meaning that, I believe, will determine our planet’s future. As sustainability designers, we need to master the skills that will gain us entrance to these wars. Our challenge is huge because we need not only grab attention in an incredibly media saturated world, but we also need to shift the deep stories people carry with them. We need to be savvy entertainers and master myth makers. So why are these story wars happening? Well human beings have always shared stories, or myths. to make sense of their world. Creation myths, hero stories, gods, demons. Myths make cooperation possible by creating a sense of “us”. When you share the same stories with someone, you’re likely to share the same values and identity. And myths make war possible by creating a sense of “them”. So stories are powerful. And where there’s power there’s struggle for it.:30 (3:30)
  • No choice but to embrace the role of mythmaker and change the storyThis is the formula for getting startedTo bring about a more sustainable future, we have no choice but to write new myths. We now have the communications tools and the potential to tell the kinds of stories people are dying to hear. We now need to embrace our role as mythmakers and infuse every communications strategy with Explanation, meaning and Story, Freaks, Cheats and Familiars. We can re-create the successes of my friend Annie and shift the conversation a few million people at a time.
  • Transcript of "Jonah Sachs - Pazarlama Zirvesi 2012"

    1. 1. Winning the Story WarsJONAH SACHSCEO | FREE RANGE STUDIOS
    2. 2. Storytelling
    3. 3. Survival of the fittestTransmission is a webEveryone owns ideas
    4. 4. Survival of the richestTransmission is one to manyIdeas are proprietary
    5. 5. Survival of the fittestTransmission is a webEveryone owns ideas
    6. 6. What will survivethe landscape ofour new oral traditions?
    7. 7. Stories
    8. 8. The best brands will begreat stories
    9. 9. The Moral:• is the truth behind every communication• provides brand consistency• makes intuitive sense but stretches what we know
    10. 10. NIKEAchievement through hard work
    11. 11. OBAMA 2008Community
    12. 12. APPLESelf-Expression
    13. 13. The Hero
    14. 14. The Hero• Is not you• Is your audience• Is dissatisfied with a “broken world”• has an inner calling to livevalues
    15. 15. The Hero The Mentor
    16. 16. The Mentor• Is your brand• gets the hero moving toward her destiny• makes change appealing• Is a real, tangible person
    17. 17. Archetypes
    18. 18. The Hero The Mentor The Gift
    19. 19. The Gift:• is the wildcard that makes the impossible possible• is something unique, beautiful and entirely unexpected
    20. 20. The Hero The Mentor The Gift
    21. 21. The Brand AnxietyThe Consumer
    22. 22. Empowerment Marketing
    23. 23. freerange.com/StoryWarsBooklet text “story” to 86677 @jonahsachs

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