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UCGEC Smart Grid Seminar Ii
 

UCGEC Smart Grid Seminar Ii

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presentation from the US China Green Energy Council Smart Grid Seminar, at Google HQ, Mountain View, July 8, 2009

presentation from the US China Green Energy Council Smart Grid Seminar, at Google HQ, Mountain View, July 8, 2009

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    UCGEC Smart Grid Seminar Ii UCGEC Smart Grid Seminar Ii Presentation Transcript

    • The Power of Information Google’s PowerMeter Project Edward Tsang Lu Google.org Google Confidential and Proprietary 1
    • Google Confidential and Proprietary
    • The Opportunity and Problem Google Confidential and Proprietary
    • How do YOU think about buying electricity? • How many people know the MPG of their vehicle? • How many people know the kWh per day of their home? • Has anyone tried to make efficiency improvements to your home? • Does anyone drive a Prius or have an in-home device to monitor electricity? • What is your experience with buying electricity? Google Confidential and Proprietary 4
    • “If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it” 13% 12% 10% 15% 18% 10-15% • On average, people reduce their energy by 5-15% just by having real time feedback on their energy consumption • If just half the U.S. households cut their demand by 10%, the electricity savings would be greater than today's total U.S. wind and solar power output. The CO2 emission avoided would be equal to taking approx. 8 million cars off the road. Google Confidential and Proprietary 5
    • A contrasting example Google Confidential and Proprietary 6
    • Our Mission To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. Online Content Offline Content Billions of web pages Billions of items becoming indexed Google Confidential and Proprietary
    • Add Google PowerMeter to your personalized homepage Google Confidential and Proprietary 8
    • A closer look…. Google Confidential and Proprietary
    • Goals for Google PowerMeter Help customers reduce waste / inefficiency  Detailed access to energy usage and cost information  Ability to compare energy use with friends and community  Ability to measure home energy efficiency improvements  Save customers energy and money Help utilities help their customers  Allow utilities to more effectively engage with consumers (e.g. broadcast announcements, branding opportunities, etc.)  Enable utility company programs to shave peak electricity use and improve efficiency  Leverage Google’s expertise in organizing information for energy Help the world  Change the way people think about and use energy  Measurable CO2 reductions Google Confidential and Proprietary 10
    • How Google PowerMeter works Data flow: Smart Meter -> utility -> Google -> customer Google Confidential and Proprietary
    • Q&A Google Confidential and Proprietary 12
    • Distributed Intelligence and the Intel Open Energy Initiative John Skinner Eco-Technology Director of Marketing Intel Corporation Alternate Board Member and Marketing Co-Chair Climate Savers Computing Initiative
    • Summary  Intelligence is rapidly being embedded in the grid, end-to- end  Moore’s Law  “Distributed Intelligence” everywhere  Our ability to fully harness this Distributed Intelligence relies on our ability to interconnect it.  Open Standards are key to creating “Connected Intelligence”  We must “Empower” Energy Users with Information, Tools, and Communities  Harness the “Collective Intelligence” of Energy Users Distributed, Connected, Collective Intelligence
    • Intel’s efforts in Renewable Energy Intel receives Green Power Leadership Award from US. EPA:  Intel is the largest corporate purchaser of renewable energy in the U.S. and holds the #1 spot on their Green Power Partner list  About 47% of Intel’s purchased electricity usage will come Intel’ from renewable sources such as wind and solar Intel site solar installations begin and expand quickly:  Bangalore, India - solar water heaters now saving 70,000 kilowatts per year (2% of the site's electricity).  Oregon, USA - a 100Kw electric PV system on the roof of Jones Farm campus will be operational later this year.  New Mexico, USA - a solar demonstration project highlighting PV uses and benefits in data centers with be completed later this year * Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    • Intel Capital Investments in Renewable Energy & Smart Grid Technology Solar Energy Technology  SpectraWatt: Photovoltaic Cells for Solar Panels  Sulfurcell: Thin Film Solar Power Modules  Voltaix: Materials for Solar Cell Manufacturing  Trony Solar: Thin Film Solar Power Modules Smart Electricity Grid  Grid Net: WiMAX-based Smart Meter Infrastructure WiMAX- Advanced Energy Storage  Net Power Holdings: Flow Batteries for Commercial Buildings Smart Home Automation  Arch Rock: Ultra-low-power IP based sensor technology Ultra-low-  Gainspan: Ultra-low-power WiFi sensor network technology Ultra-low- *Other brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    • Smart Grid = More than just Smart Meters
    • Grid Data Explosion  Compute Capacity Gap *Other brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    • Intelligence being distributed into 3 major domains: Smart Buildings Grid Infrastructure Utility IT & Cloud 1) PC, Internet-TV Internet- 4) Substation Controllers 7) Efficient Servers 2) In-Home Displays (IHD) In- 5) Data Concentrators (consolidation, virtualization, 3) Energy Gateways/Meters 6) Renewables Integration manageability, HPC) 8) PC’s and Workstations PC’ (manageability, mobility) 9) Meter Data Processing, Grid Modeling/Simulation, Data warehousing, Analytics, forecasting/ modeling, energy trading, etc.
    • Distributed Intelligence Example: Renewable Energy Sources There are I0-20 Microprocessors in a modern Wind Turbine: Localized intelligence, in the form of embedded wind turbine controllers based on rugged embedded Intel® architecture platforms, can control turbine vane pitch, rotation, and other variables in response to real-time information including changing wind conditions and electrical load requirements, without human intervention. In addition, network sensors mounted on the turbine communicate data to the embedded computer to monitor operating parameters *Other brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    • As Intelligence gets distributed throughout the Grid, Energy + IT Industry Collaboration is required R-I PDU R-I PDU RTU RTU Distribution-Connected, Campus-Level Distribution- Campus- Smart Smart Renewables Transmission-Connected, Transmission- Substations Utility-Scale Smart Renewables Utility- R-I Transmission My Utility Smart Ops Centers Distribution Feeders Network Ops DCU DCU Smart Metering IED R-I Renewables & Smart Energy Smart Demand Service Smart Building/Homes with EV, Ops Center Providers DCUDCU = data concentrator unit R-I R-I = Renewables Integration control devices Residential Renewables PDU PDU = Phasor Data Unit (key part of an advance IT system on the TX grid) RTU RTU = a lower-tech but ubiquitous device called a Remote Terminal IED Unit IED = Intelligent Electronic Device – a common and generic name
    • Example of Energy + IT Industry Collaboration: Intel + SGCC  State Grid Corp of China: 3 year build-out of "Smart Grid”  Cover 80% of China’s mainland and 1 billion people  Collaboration via joint Intel + SGCC Lab to develop & optimize: – Grid Modeling and Simulation Software – Network Isolation and Power Station Automation – Applications of Embedded Technologies Other brands and names are the property of their respective owners. owners.
    • Enabling Distributed Intelligence “A System of Open Systems” Approach Grid Operators, Utilities, Building Owners, and Vendors should take end- to-end view - and have eye on the future - as they design and specify their particular sub-systems SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS: – Exploit Moore’s Law – put network-ready Intelligence everywhere – “glue” to manage inter-system connections – Subsystems should be both “Connection-ready” and “Future-ready” – Exploit existing technologies for Remote Management
    • 24 Distributed Intelligence in Buildings Buildings are key to electricity usage and CO2 impact –76% of US electricity is used by buildings1 –43% of CO2 is generated by buildings2 –Data centers are critical extreme case Industry Challenge –Make grid smarter, make buildings smarter, make them communicate –Today most residential and light commercial buildings are “dumb” (1) Energy Information Association; (2) Pew Center for Global Climate Change
    • Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS) Distributed Intelligence = Consumer Empowerment
    • Intel HEMS Research circa 2005  Intel worked with local utility + meter vendor, to create a PC-based Home Energy Management System (HEMS), using Home Automation components  Three areas of focus: – Usage Awareness via TV User Interface (Windows Media Center) – Demand-Shifting, via Pre-cooling and Off-peak overcooling – Demand-Response load reduction (System watched utilities website)  Results published via IEEE paper in 2006
    • 27 Can Info + User Control Make a Difference? Consumer Empowerment Based on $20 M pilot by California utilities, that involved 2,500 customers, over a three year period, gateway systems reduced loads far in excess of dynamic pricing and smart thermostats alone. Technology Peak Demand Reduction* Time of use Pricing Information 8% Dynamic Pricing Signals 13% Smart Thermostat 27% HEMS like device 43% * The Brattle Group “The Power of 5 Percent”, The Electricity Journal, October, 2007
    • Coming Soon: Home Energy Management System Running on Your Internet TV HEMS Technology using Widget Channel + Intel-based CE Device
    • Some Implications, Conclusions  Awareness PLUS Load Control can save energy and flatten demand profiles. Consumers want this on any/all screens: – PC, TV, Handset, Dedicated In-Home Display – Utility Smart Grid/Home pilots will evaluate all of these technologies  While Monitoring + Control is technically feasible today - it isn’t easy  Standard are required to enable scalability, reduce costs, and ensure interoperability – Standards for energy data from meters – Standards for interfacing with the home control system – Standards for interfacing with the wider public grid
    • Enabling Connected Intelligence  Interoperability is a big focus for the Smart Energy industry  Open interfaces, network-readiness, inter-system standards  SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS: – Specify open, secure networks that can be flexibly connected to others – Utilize IP (including IPSO) where possible – STANDARDS: Get involved - in the efforts of NIST, IEEE P2030, etc..
    • Example: Smart Grid Standards Efforts IEEE P2030 MEETING: HELP SHAPE THE SMART GRID GUIDE • The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) launched a groundbreaking smart grid initiative hosted by Intel in Santa Clara, CA, June 2009. • The goal of the initiative is to create: • The IEEE Standard 2030 Guide for Smart Grid Interoperability of Energy Technology and Information Technology Operation with the Electric Power System (EPS) and End-Use Applications and Loads.  IEEE-SA P2030 will help guide the integration of energy technology and information and communications technologies to enable the smart grid. *Other brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    • Intel Open Energy Initiative Intel Actions Include:  Leadership in smart grid standards bodies  Research & Development of “Smart Energy” technologies Energy”  Partnerships with Utilities on Smart Grid pilots and deployment  Strategic venture investment via Intel Capital  Smart Energy Policy Influence Intel’s Objective: Drive deployment of open standards which accelerate the integration of, and synergy between:  Intelligent Renewable Energy Sources  Smart Grids  Smart Buildings  Empowered Energy Consumers *Other brands may be claimed as the property of others.
    • The Power of Collective Intelligence Networks of Empowered Energy Users The rise of the “Personal Smart Grid” - Personal Network of Energy Assets: - HEMS, Appliances, Rooftop Solar, PHEV, Storage, PV/EV-to- Grid,… – Monitored and Controlled from any screen - TV, PC, IHD, Handheld,.. – Opportunity for learning and behavior changes on a personal level Harnessing Social Computing Networks – Share Best Practices, Collaborate/Compete on Carbon-reduction – Behavior Change on Massive Scale – Driven by real-time, actionable information and control – Empowered with intuitive tools, convenient interfaces, and best practices – Reinforced with a community-based approach ala CarbonRally.com
    • Summary  Intelligence is rapidly becoming embedded, end-to-end  Moore’s Law  “Distributed Intelligence” everywhere  Our ability to fully harness this Distributed Intelligence relies on our ability to interconnect it.  Open Standards are key to creating “Connected Intelligence”  We must “Empower” Energy Users with Information, Tools, and Communities  Harness the “Collective Intelligence” of Energy Users Distributed, Connected, Collective Intelligence
    • Thank You!
    • Securing Smart Grid Leveraging intelligent communications to transform the power infrastructure July 9th, 2009 Saadat Malik Senior Manager, Software Development smalik@cisco.com SmartGrid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 36
    • Power Management Today’s Electrical System Energy Information Distributed Generation Sources Industrial Customer Power Generation Commercial Customer Transmission (Utility) Distribution (Local Utility ) Network Network Control Control Center Center Residential Customer SmartGrid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 37
    • Power Management Smart Grid Energy Information Distributed Generation Sources Industrial Customer Power Generation Federated Data Centers Commercial Customer Transmission (Utility) Distribution (Local Utility) Network Network Control Control Residential Customer Center Center SmartGrid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 38
    • Cisco Smart Grid Strategy End-to-End Communications Fabric Provide end-to-end, secure communications fabric to help utility companies optimize power supply and demand  Design and architect end-to-end, network from generation to home  Standards-based and interoperable  Reliable, resilient, and secure  Seamless integration with grid, commercial, industrial and residential control systems  Trusted and committed partner, delivering an integrated solution with world class products and services Smart Grid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 39
    • Smart Grid Security: A Framework Requirements   Physical network devices Hardened security and systems  Identity and access control policies  Identity and access control policies  Hardened network devices Critical and systems  Data protection for Situa ness Infrastructure transmission and storage Awar  Threat defense tiona e  Integrated physical security  Protection for data l transmission and storage  Comprehensive management and reporting  Real-time monitoring, management, and correlation Smart Grid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 40
    • Securing the Grid 2.0 Security for a converged demand and supply environment Next Gen Grid Renewables Integration Consumers Management Systems From centralized to distributed From static to mobile and variable From a few interfaces to many Build security into the very fabric of the next gen electricity grid Smart Grid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 41
    • Delivering Security From business use cases to security solutions Smart Grid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 42
    • Smart Grid Team #1 © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 43
    • US-China Green Energy Council (UCGEC) Smart Grid Seminar No. 2 How IT will Enable the Smart Grid Comments on Panel Presentations Stephen Lee Senior Technical Executive Power Delivery & Utilization July 9, 2009
    • Key Points from the Power Grid Perspective • End-to-End Power Delivery Value Chain – Must work Seamlessly As a Whole – Consider All parts together (Holistic approach) • Standards and Inter-Operability – Key for Seamless Integration • Innovation from IT Industry to Strengthen the Foundations of the Power Grid – Data into Information – Intelligent and Smart Solutions 45
    • End-to-End Power Delivery Value Chain Operation & Planning Power Plants Transmission System Distribution System Fuel Supply System Renewable Plants Fuel Source/Storage Energy Storage End-uses & DR Controllers Sensors Data Communication Data Communication M ZIP Wide Area Control Wide Area Control Dynamic Power Plant Models Dynamic Load Models Monitoring, Modeling, Analysis, Coordination & Control Monitoring, Modeling, Analysis, Coordination & Control 46
    • North America Electricity Interconnections 47
    • North America Electricity Balancing Authorities 48
    • Smart Grid Seminar Discussion: Seminar #2: Google, Intel, Cisco 49 US-CHINA GREEN ENERGY COUNCIL (UCGEC) SMART GRID SEMINAR PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA JULY 9, 2009 EDWARD G. CAZALET, PHD THE CAZALET GROUP AND MEGAWATT STORAGE FARMS, INC. WWW.CAZALET.COM WWW.MEGAWATTSF.COM ED@CAZALET.COM © 2009 Edward G. Cazalet
    • The Smart Grid is Happening: Fast 50 © 2009 Edward G. Cazalet