For Elearning Developers

1
What is It About?

2
Infographics are visual
representations of information.

3
1.

Easier to ‘read’ and understand
data

2.

Easier to construct meaning
and interpretation of data

3.

Bring out aspect...
How to Go About It

5


Type of data
(spatial, chronological, quantitative,
qualitative, statistical)



Volume of data



Important or drama...


Chart (flow, organizational, schematic)



Graph(quantitative data, axis of
comparison, relationships between
quantiti...


LATCH (Location Alphabetical Time
Category Hierarchy)



Visual/semiotic organisation



Accessibility of data layers...


Grid (to establish
movement, space, establish
relationships and hierarchies, denote
groupings. Think vertically and
hor...
 Gestalt perception principles
 Ask for what you need to make the
content clearer/better represented (e.g.
weaving a tra...


Static



Interactive



Animated

11
12
Samples and General Guidelines

Note:
The following infographics do not belong to me. They are samples picked up from
arou...
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
The End.

23
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Infographics 101 for elearning (instructional designers + graphics designers)

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This is a couple of slides cobbled together for elearning companies specifically, touching on what goes into an infographic, how to analyse a piece of information, the design decisions to be taken to create an infographic, some samples for discussion and so on.

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  • This kind of visual representation which clearly adds a layer of content comprehension is generally possible to create only when someone who understands design principles collaborates with someone who understands the content.
  • The first image is an example of how the content theme has been carried over to the visual theme. It’s ‘stronger’ graphic in the sense that even without accompanying text, the context is very closely woven into the informaiton representation. In the second, the content theme is used to contain the actual information representation: here the link between the visual theme and the content is milder than in the first graphic.
  • (There’s obviously way too much information here: a clear case where a single view doesn’t help unless the point to be conveyed is that the scene is complex/incomprehensible!)
  • Deeply pointless type of graphic used often in elearning. Unless the content actually deals with the ontology or terminology in a subject and how often which words are used, this graphic doesn’t help.
  • (Recommended that this be used for discussion)
  • While the representation is in keeping with the style of infographics, the information conveyed is cliched and trivialized.
  • While it’s good to highlight the aspects that viewers should particularly note, there’s a bit too much of that in this picture: Do we focus on the red dots (clearly the colour warrants special attention), or to the bar graph in the circumference? In between reading the two, should I keep coming back to the national average shown on the left half? Which is the element holding the information together or providing the baseline?
  • Wonderful for a process training, don’tcha think!
  • Infographics 101 for elearning (instructional designers + graphics designers)

    1. 1. For Elearning Developers 1
    2. 2. What is It About? 2
    3. 3. Infographics are visual representations of information. 3
    4. 4. 1. Easier to ‘read’ and understand data 2. Easier to construct meaning and interpretation of data 3. Bring out aspects of data that support deeper reflection 4
    5. 5. How to Go About It 5
    6. 6.  Type of data (spatial, chronological, quantitative, qualitative, statistical)  Volume of data  Important or dramatic aspects in the data  Purpose of showing this data in a course (do this with the ID) 6
    7. 7.  Chart (flow, organizational, schematic)  Graph(quantitative data, axis of comparison, relationships between quantities)  Map (locational, schematic, spatial)  Diagram (icon, sequence, process, timeline) 7
    8. 8.  LATCH (Location Alphabetical Time Category Hierarchy)  Visual/semiotic organisation  Accessibility of data layers (do this with the ID) 8
    9. 9.  Grid (to establish movement, space, establish relationships and hierarchies, denote groupings. Think vertically and horizontally and identify focal points)  Colour (remember to have about 70 contrast between object and background – check in grayscale.)  Contrast (limit the key you’re using: pick one of orientation, position, shape, size, text ure, or weight)  Font 9
    10. 10.  Gestalt perception principles  Ask for what you need to make the content clearer/better represented (e.g. weaving a trail of connection between all of the elements) (do part of this with the ID) 10
    11. 11.  Static  Interactive  Animated 11
    12. 12. 12
    13. 13. Samples and General Guidelines Note: The following infographics do not belong to me. They are samples picked up from around the internet from freely accessible sites. 13
    14. 14. 14
    15. 15. 15
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. 21
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. The End. 23
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