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Graphing
Graphing
Graphing
Graphing
Graphing
Graphing
Graphing
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Graphing

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This slideshow provides the basics on creating a graph.

This slideshow provides the basics on creating a graph.

Published in: Technology
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Transcript

  • 1. Rules for Graphing
    • Use graph paper and indent each axis.
    • Work in pencil and use a ruler .
    • Title the graph .
  • 2. Variables
    • Decide which information goes at the bottom and which information goes up the side .
    • A variable is any factor that can change in an experiment.
    • The variable you control goes on the bottom. The responding variable goes up the vertical axis.
  • 3. The X and Y axis
    • .The one you control is called the independent
    • variable and the one that responds is called
    • the dependent variable.
    • Label the Y-axis , the vertical axis, (up and down) and place the proper units in parenthesis.
    • Label the X-axis , the horizontal axis, and place the proper units in parenthesis.
  • 4. Use labels and units
    • The one you control is called the independent variable and the one that responds is called the dependent variable.
    • Label the X-axis , the horizontal axis, and place the proper units in parenthesis.
    • Label the Y-axis , the vertical axis, (up and down) and place the proper units in parenthesis.
  • 5. Use labels and units X Label (Units) L a b e l (Units) Y
  • 6. Adding data
    • Spread your data out so that you use the whole page. Look at your lowest number and your highest number and determine how much each line should be worth. Example: Lowest number 20, highest number 52, so don’t need to start at 0.
    • Determine what kind of graph you need.
  • 7. Plotting your data
    • Use a different color for multiple line graphs.
    • Make a key to show what each colored line represents.
    • Plot your data points and connect your data points if using a line graph.

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