Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
History of internet
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

History of internet

1,112
views

Published on

This is my take on how we got to social networking.

This is my take on how we got to social networking.

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,112
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. From Internet to world wide web
  • 2. Why do this?
    • To find out where we ’re going, start with where we were.
  • 3. E-mail started it
    • 1961: MIT demonstrates the Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS)
    • E-mail started in 1965 as a way for multiple users of a time-sharing mainframe computer to communicate.
  • 4. Isn’t it all just a game?
    • Mazewar is launched at NASA in 1973 when someone had the idea to put people in the maze.
    • Two Imlacs were connected
    • The first person shooter MMORPGs was born.
  • 5. The Internet. C. 1974
    • The term “Internet” was first used in 1974.
    • A bunch of different ‘nets’ where floating round with names like ARPANET, MILNET, NSFNet and NSI.
    • The internet started primarily in the US (and with the military), but moved to places all around the world. They were interconnected networks of computers.
    • An InterNet.
  • 6. 1970 ’s – Newsgroup Era
    • Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis invent UseNet in 1979
    • Users read and post public messages (called articles or posts, and collectively termed news) to one or more categories, known as newsgroups.
    • UseNet user groups predated the World Wide Web by a decade, and are among the first social networks.
  • 7. 1970 ’s – Newsgroup Era
    • People subscribed to lists that included 7 large categories. They were: comp. humanities. misc. news. rec. sci. soc. talk.
  • 8. 1970 ’s – Newsgroup Era
    • Later, .alt was added.
    • .alt is either alternative to the big 7, or if you prefer, it stands for “Anarchists, Lunatics, and Terrorists”
    • Incidentally, alt.fan.tom-robbins, a social network, is where I met my wife.
  • 9. 1980 ’s – Cyberspace
    • 1981: Virtual Banking services start in New York when four of the city ’s major banks (Citibank, Chase Manhattan, Chemical and Manufacturers Hanover) offered home banking services using the videotex system
  • 10. 1980 ’s – Cyberspace
    • Coke machine connected to Internet in 1982
    • Located in the Science Hall at Carnegie-Mellon University.
    • From the Internet one could query the status of the Coke machine by typing “finger coke@CMUA”.
    • The Coke machine was reportedly fingered a lot.
  • 11. 1980 ’s – Cyberspace
    • William Gibson uses the term “Cyberspace” potentially before anyone else, in his 1982 short story Burning Chrome
    • Scott E. Fahlman invents the smiley in 1984
    • On early bulletin boards, when people were trying to be funny, they came across as idiots. The smiley helped the social web by showing when people who couldn ’t write were kidding around.
  • 12. 1980 ’s – Cyberspace
    • Symbolic.com becomes first registered domain on March 15th, 1985.
    • McAfee Associates founded; anti-virus software available for free in 1989.
    • Quantum becomes America Online in 1989, and a whole bunch of people forward e-mail jokes and get-rich-quick schemes.
  • 13. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • CERN employee Timothy John Berners-Lee creates the World Wide Web in 1990
    • On 25 December 1990 he implemented the first successful communication between an HTTP client and server via the Internet with the help of Robert Cailliau and a young student staff at CERN
    • N o longer the Internet, we call it the World Wide Web.
  • 14. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet.
    • It s the HTTP:// at the front of all pages. (The inventor of this protocol later agreed this was unnecessary.)
  • 15. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • 1991: Neverwinter Nights, the first "truly" graphical multi-user RPG was delivered through America Online.
  • 16. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • Jean Armour Polly, a librarian, writes an an article called “Surfing the INTERNET”, published in the University of Minnesota Wilson Library Bulletin in June, 1992.
    • ViolaWWW, created in 1992, was the first browser to use authoring technology such as embedded scriptable objects, stylesheets, and tables.
  • 17. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • InterNIC created by NSF to provide specific Internet services is created in 1993. This is the place that lets you register .com or .whatevers
    • World Wide Web grows by 341,000% in 1993.
  • 18. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • US White House goes on-line in 1993
    • Look, you could sign the guestbook
  • 19. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • Mosaic Web Browser released April 22 nd , 1993. Getting a jump on the browser wars.
    • Mosaic Communications Corporation becomes Netscape Communications Corporation in April, 1994.
  • 20. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • 1994: the first Wiki application is written and called WikiWikiWeb
    • ” Wiki" is the Hawaiian word for fast.
    • The idea was to make WikiWikiWeb's pages quickly editable by its users, so it could be updated fast.
    • Wiki ’s are now communities.
  • 21. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • Stanford Federal Credit Union was the first financial institution to offer online internet banking services to all of its members in Oct, 1994
  • 22. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • Jan 1995: The first known example of a brothel online. It ’s women posting on USENET talking about sex, but trying to create a network.
  • 23. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • 1995-1998: online porn becomes one of the true innovators online. From video, to pictures, the porn industry grew.
    • One of the biggest releases was the Pamela Anderson, Tommy Lee honeymoon sex tape. Posted online in 1998.
  • 24. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • March, 1995: Bryon Southerland puts his diary online for the world to read - including his business and his relationships. Considered the first blogger.
  • 25. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • Sun Microsystems Releases Java in May 1995
    • Microsoft releases Windows 95 with Internet Explorer, released in August, 1995. (And the browser wars start).
  • 26. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • From June 1995 to June 1997, a community called “The Spot” captures the attention of the web. Wired calls Melrose Place (a TV show at the time) tired, while The Spot is wired.
    • The characters kept online diaries (like blogs), responded to emails and posted images of their current activities. In addition the site boasted short multimedia movies, as well as photos relating to the diary entries.
    • It was an ad supported community.
  • 27. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
  • 28. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • January, 1996: A research project by Larry Page, Sergey Brin, two Ph.D. students at Stanford University in California, begins.
    • Called BackRub, it is designed to help people get feel lucky when they find content.
  • 29. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • Thankfully, it gets renamed.
    • Not sure if “I’ll backrub it” would’ve caught on.
  • 30. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • April, 1996: JenniCAM, the the website for Jennifer Ringley, goes live. Ringely left her webcam on 24 hours a day to fully document her life and quickly became an internet phenomenon.
  • 31. 1990 ’s – The World Wide Web
    • With all details of Ringley's life on display, this was one of the first opportunities ever, in any medium, to legally observe the ordinary human sexual behavior of a complete stranger.
    • She continued her site in one form or another until 2003 when she 'retired' from the public eye.
    • In June 2008, CNET hailed JenniCam as one of the greatest defunct websites in history. She laid the groundwork for LoneyGirl15 in the YouTube era.
  • 32. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • October 12, 1996. The Dancing baby dances into our lives.
  • 33. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • W idely considered the first Viral Video and definitely an internet phenomenon.
    • It made the mainstream by appearing on Ally McBeal
  • 34. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • July 4, 1996: Hotmail service is launched on Independence Day, symbolizing "freedom" from ISP-based e-mail.
    • Offered the ability to access a user's inbox from anywhere in the world.
    • "Hotmail" was chosen because it included the letters HTML. The original name was spelled HoTMaiL.
  • 35. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • November, 1996: ICQ (I seek you) became the first Internet-wide instant messaging service. This was a hugely popular social network.
    • ICQ was a free download, and was the machine that eventually built AOL Instant Messenger when AOL purchased the company in 1998.
  • 36. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • In 1998 Netscape announces plans to give its browser away for free.
    • From that moment on, it i s free to browse the internet wit Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer which have 100% of the market.
  • 37. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • In September, 1998, Slashdot.org comes online. It ’s the precursor to social bookmarking sites like Digg.
    • It it makes it to Slashdot, it s talked about online.
  • 38. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • Hank, The Angry Drunken Dwarf, a Howard Stern character wins People Magazines Most beautiful person of the year award in 1998.
    • The vote is online, and Stern urges listeners to write in Hank on the ballot. And he wins.
  • 39. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • Hank ’s win received mainstream coverage. The story was about how the internet has no rules. People Magazine weren’t in control of the results since software tallied the votes. It was a new world, with the risk of an Angry Dwarf beating Brad Pitt for Most Beautiful Person.
  • 40. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • In October, 1999, The Blair Witch Project changes the way movies are marketed online.
    • With a small budget, the studio created a web page that positioned the movie as a real documentary.
    • This was a breakthrough way to present a movie.
  • 41. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • 1999: Shawn Fanning launches Napster. Creates peer-to-peer file sharing and changes the record business, and the way the we think about music.
  • 42. The World Wide Web. C. 1990 ’s
    • 1999: Blogger is launched.
    • As one of the earliest dedicated blog-publishing tools, it is credited for helping popularize the format.
    • In other words, the Blogoshpere is their fault.
  • 43. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In early 2000, Fixed wireless, high-speed Internet technology is seen as a viable alternative to copper and fiber optic lines placed in the ground.
    • In Feb 2000, 10,000,000 domain names have been registered (by Spetember, that number had doubled.
    • On March 10, 2000, the NASDAQ peaks. By March 15 th , it had lost almost 10%. The bubble burst.
  • 44. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • January, 2001: Wikipedia is launched.
    • The idea of True is forever changed without anyone knowing it.
  • 45. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Then came September 11 th , and a new phenomena really found traction on the Web. The photoshopped image.
  • 46. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • It spread around the net fast in those days after 9/11 before people realized in was a fake.
  • 47. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • October 2001: A failing computer company begins selling music in the middle of the dot com bust, one month after 9/11.
    • Hmmm.
    • In 2007, they record the 1 billionth download.
  • 48. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Amazon.com turned it ’s first ever profit in the 4 th quarter of 2001.
    • It was tiny, but symbolic. The web could work, especially if community was involved.
    • Amazon.com hinted at community by showing book buyers what buyers of that book also bought.
  • 49. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • eBay is another example of letting community into the site. Launched in 1995, it really comes of age in the 2000 ’s because of community.
    • Since the early days, eBay members have helped one other be successful on the site. Rating of sellers brought the community aspect into the website. Turning visitors to the site into true members of the community.
  • 50. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • StumbleUpon launches in Canada in 2002.
    • As the dust settles from the Dot Com Burst, innovation occurs around the world.
  • 51. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • On November 3 rd , 2002, the Star Wars Kid is released.
  • 52. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Originally spread through Kazaa, a Napster-like file sharing service, it s estimated that this video has been seen 1000 million times, making it the number one viral video of all time.
    • Which begs the question: why would a video of a kid dancing to star wars be worth watching? We watch because we can ’t believe he’s doing it, and because we know he never wanted it released
    • He sued the classmates that added it to Kazaa.
  • 53. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In January, 2003, The SQL Slammer worm dramatically slows down the internet.
    • Starting at 05:30 it spreads rapidly around the world infecting most of the victims within ten minutes.
  • 54. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In January, 2003, The SQL Slammer worm dramatically slows down the internet.
    • Starting at 05:30 it spreads rapidly around the world infecting most of the victims within ten minutes.
  • 55. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Second Life is an Internet-based virtual world video game launches on June 23, 2003
  • 56. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • August 2003, Skype launches in Luxenburg.
    • It s one of the early innovators of internet based phone calling.
  • 57. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In December, 2003, The Research project “How much information 2003” finds that Instant messaging generates five billion messages a day (750GB), or 274 Terabytes a year.
    • E-mail generates about 400,000 terabytes of new information each year worldwide.
    • If digitized with full formatting, the seventeen million books in the Library of Congress contain about 136 terabytes of information.
  • 58. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • 2003-2004 was, without question, the online dating years.
    • At the end of November 2004, there were 844 lifestyle and dating sites, a 38 percent increase since the start of the year, according to Hitwise Inc.
    • Online dating and porn where the most profitable dating sites.
  • 59. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • US residents spend $469.5 million in online dating and personals in 2004,
    • $500 million in 2005
    • For perspective, this is almost as much as people spent on porn.
    • You can see how the market was ready for social networks. And along they came.
  • 60. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • March, 2003, Friendster opens up for Beta. By the end of 2003, it s one of the most popular sites on the Internet.
    • When it launched, it felt like a free dating site. But it was all social network as it focused on the ‘Web of Friends’.
  • 61. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • After the launch of Friendster, some people with Friendster accounts saw its potential and decided to mimic the more popular features of the social networking website,
    • In August 2003. Within 10 days, the first version of MySpace was ready for launch
  • 62. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • February, 2004: TheFacebook.com launches for Harvard Students only. (Dropped ‘the’ in 2006)
    • It first expanded to Ivy League Schools, then other universities, then high schools.
    • In September of 2006, anyone with a valid e-mail address could join.
  • 63. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Feb, 2004. Burger King launches its landmark “viral” site. Millions of people ordered the Chicken around.
  • 64. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Feb, 2004. Flickr is launched.
    • No one ever needs to look at photos of Uncle John ’s vacation again. They’re available online. In a slideshow.
    • This marks an era of weird sounding sites with colorful logos.
  • 65. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • Oct, 2004. Rocketboom, one of the first vlogs (video blogs) goes online.
    • Rocketboom started on October 2004 as a daily webcast staged as a mini-Newscast. By December it already had 25,000 downloads per day and growing, with its promotion depending mostly of word-of-mouth.
  • 66. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In October, 2004, O'Reilly Media hosts a conference called Web 2.0.
    • “ The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web…Shakeouts typically mark the point at which an ascendant technology is ready to take its place at center stage.” Tim O’Reilly, explaining Web 2.0.
  • 67. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In October, 2004, O'Reilly Media hosts a conference called Web 2.0.
    • “ The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web…Shakeouts typically mark the point at which an ascendant technology is ready to take its place at center stage.” Tim O’Reilly, explaining Web 2.0.
  • 68. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s Web 1.0 Web 2.0 O ’Reilly Media Ofoto Flickr Akamai BITorrent Britannica Wikipedia Personal sites Blogs Evite Upcoming, Cyber-squatting Username squatting Publishing Participation Stickiness RSS Double click Google Adsense CMS Wikis
  • 69. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • In 2004, Digg is launched, and propels to the top of the Social News Sharing sites.
    • It would stay there until an unfortunate redesign all-but killed it.
  • 70. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • February, 2005: YouTube.com is registered.
    • May, 2005: A public preview of the site is unveiled.
    • Before YouTube, it wasn ’t easy to broadcast yourself. YouTube made it staggeringly easy.
  • 71. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • 2005 on: The Web Is a Platform.
    • The launchuage changes a little. We don ’t go to the YouTube Website. We go to YouTube.
    • We don ’t visit Facebook’s website. We visit Facebook.
    • The word Website is dropped from many sites. YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Digg, they are all platforms. Not websites.
  • 72. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • That ’s new. And it’s thinking different.
    • It s thinking that if you can give people a reason to join a community, they will come back to your platform.
    • It s the creation of sites that act an awful lot like products (Facebook, Twitter, etc).
    • In 2006, there are an estimated 92 million Web sites online. But the popular ones aren ’t called websites.
  • 73. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • August, 1996: In this world of Free, AOL announces that they will give for free virtually every service for which it charged a monthly fee.
    • Free long distance with Skype, free e-mail, free websites (blogs), social networks, storage for pictures (Flickr) and Video (YouTube).
    • These sites give you something for free in return for more of your attention.
  • 74. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • July 2005: Fox pays US$580 million for the attention of people on MySpace. (They sell it in 2011 for less than 100 million to Justin Timberlake)
    • March 2005, Yahoo pays undisclosed millions for the attention of people on Flickr.
    • Then in December 2005.Yahoo they pay between $15-$30 million for the attention of people on Delicious
    • October 1996: Google pays 1.65 billion for the attention of people on YouTube.
  • 75. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • And the race to monetize is on.
    • In March 2007, it ’s estimated that 1.114 billion people use the Internet (Internet World Stats.)
  • 76. The World Wide Web. C. 2000 ’s
    • And the race to monetize is on.
    • In March 2007, it ’s estimated that 1.114 billion people use the Internet (Internet World Stats.)
    • These sites (among others) battle for that ever-increasing pie.
  • 77.