Open Access Week - University of Texas at Austin

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A talk reemphasizing the importance of participatory culture, shared culture, open practice, and open pedagogy - not simply the process of creating, searching for, and using OER.

A talk reemphasizing the importance of participatory culture, shared culture, open practice, and open pedagogy - not simply the process of creating, searching for, and using OER.

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  • 1. Open Educational Resources Past, Present...Future? Garin Fons Interna'onal WEEK 2013 Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
  • 2. ROCKIN’ RUSSIAN
  • 3. the end the present the past the beginning the end - a shared, participatory culture the present - OER, OA, OCW, eLearning, etc. the past - former initiatives, challenges, rumors the beginning - change in practice, in mentality.
  • 4. the end ronsho © Some rights reserved
  • 5. Why are we here today? Why are we interested in Open? What is our shared interest? Our intent in promoting Open? What is Open Access Week all about really? where does this all lead? Martin Gommel Some Rights Reserved
  • 6. CC: BY-NC-SA sciencesque http://www.flickr.com/photos/apoptotic/2540055580/ toward a culture of open-ness.
  • 7. toward a participatory culture using and reusing creative materials for a variety of purposes.
  • 8. art DailyPic Some rights reserved
  • 9. music Recovering Sick Soul Some rights reserved
  • 10. education One Laptop per Child Some rights reserved
  • 11. It’s a culture of participation, of collaboration, of sharing, of freedom and access to information and ideas. A cultural ideal that we build on the work of those who come before us. a shared culture. that creativity and innovation don’t happen in vacuums, but in spaces where people can use and reuse.
  • 12. how we get there is important. Canned Muffins Some rights reserved
  • 13. by mandate Public Domain Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/statelibraryqueensland/4442673734/
  • 14. by choice cc: by-nc-sa jairoagua http://www.flickr.com/photos/31065898@N08/8220970905/
  • 15. forming a shared culture • faculty, students, staff, administrators use, create, and share openly licensed educational media. • institutions support open access journals and open textbooks. • developers use and contribute to openly licensed software initiatives that function on open source platforms. • all parties participate in innovative teaching and learning exercises that uphold open principles.
  • 16. getting there is a process. Peter Suber: “There is no benefit in being closed, only benefit in being high quality, peer reviewed.” Robert Farrow, Open University UK: “openness describes its use, not just what it is”
  • 17. the present Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/5679580299/
  • 18. What are Open Educational Resources? “a universal educational resource available for the whole of humanity” (UNESCO, 2002) Forum on the Impact of Open Courseware for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries. This group met to discuss the implications of MIT’s OpenCourseWare initiative; and in the report generated from this meeting they described an Open Education Resource as “a universal educational resource available for the whole of humanity.” CC: BY-SA Opensourceway http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/6555466069/ bringing resources to the public for free, without restriction, and for the benefit of the public.
  • 19. What are Open Educational Resources? “Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under a copyright license that permits their free use and repurposing by others.” - Dr. David Wiley (Lumen Learning) Photo: License Undetermined http://davidwiley.org/
  • 20. Wide Variety of OER Teaching & Learning Materials • Open Textbooks (Digital / Print-on-Demand) • Open Courseware (Presentations, Recorded Lectures, Lecture Notes, Syllabi) • Classroom activities, lesson plans, assessments • Homework and practice exercises • Online modules and exercises Authentic content in the L2 (texts, video, audio, images, realia) Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/osucommons/3529534404/
  • 21. What are Open Educational Resources ? “...educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some license to re-mix, improve and redistribute.” - Hewlett Foundation • free, as in no fees, does not mean open • open access does not mean openly licensed
  • 22. Free vs. Open No cost vs. Freedom to reuse, revise, remix, redistribute. Of the vast number of online resources accessible for free; few are actually Open. CC: BY-NC CodyHoffman http://www.flickr.com/photos/thepinklemon/3876034684/
  • 23. graphic from: David Wiley - iterating toward openness Free vs. Open
  • 24. The 4Rs Reuse use the content in its unaltered / verbatim form. Revise adapt, adjust, modify, improve, or alter (translate). Remix combine the original or revised content with another OER to create something new. Redistribute share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others. CC: BY Ivan Zuber http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivanzuber/2776100984/
  • 25. C All Rights Reserved
  • 26. Copyright protects your creativity against uses you don’t consent to. CC: BY-NC-SA Great Beyond http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyjcase/7483795014/
  • 27. Copyright limits the 4Rs exclusive right to: • • • • make copies distribute, share, sell perform or display in public make derivative works (adaptations, translations, supplemental materials) • distribute, share, sell, and copy derivative works • license others to do those things Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/3915529903/
  • 28. Writings Art Music Movies All Images Public Domain Content
  • 29. what is the purpose of copyright? The U.S. National Archives no known copyright restrictions
  • 30. Purpose of Copyright? “to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for a limited Time to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." - From The U.S. Constitution Resource available for the whole of humanity. remember the earlier definition by UNESCO? Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/4727525216/
  • 31. Purpose of Copyright? “to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for a limited Time to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." Copyright law is about the balance between the authors’ need to make money and society’s need for progress. But for progress to happen, people need to be able to share knowledge and create works based on other works. - From The U.S. Constitution “seriously? Maybe 150 years before someone can use this photo?” Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/4727525216/
  • 32. CC Some Rights Reserved
  • 33. Benefits of Open Licenses
  • 34. Some rights reserved: a spectrum Public Domain All Rights Reserved least restrictive most restrictive http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • 35. Benefits of Open Licenses Users allowed to: • Copy & distribute (don’t have to ask permission from the copyright holder) • Legally download and publish (don’t have to rely just on linking) • Adapt and customize the material (in most cases) CC: BY-NC DoimSioraf http://www.flickr.com/photos/cleanslatephotography/7899423426/
  • 36. Difference between OA and OER OA: Open Access OER: Open Educational Resources • OA focuses on sharing content, but there is no underlying licensing requirement. • OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license (nix ND). • OER and OA are friends
  • 37. OA // OER - buddies OA free, permanent, full-text, online access to scientific and scholarly works. OER openly licensed educational content available online, for download, use, reuse, redistribution.
  • 38. Difference between OCW & OER OCW: Open CourseWare OER: Open Educational Resources • OCW focuses on sharing open content that is developed specifically to instruct a course (locally taught). • OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license, whether or not it is a part of a course. • OCW is a subset of OER
  • 39. OCW // OER - overlap OER OCW, single images, general campus lectures, image collections, singular learning modules, papers or articles, videos, modules, workbooks, etc. OCW syllabi, lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, lecture videos - all related to a course.
  • 40. OER and eLearning: a relationship OER • may exist in electronic or paper form • may not contain enough context to be “instructional”. • are always licensed for reuse, redistribution, and re-mixing. eLearning resources • exist only in electronic form. • are generally designed to be instructional. • may not always be licensed for open use.
  • 41. eLearning // OER - intersection OER eLearning intersection represents openly licensed, electronic, educational resources
  • 42. MOOCs
  • 43. What we believe about OER a creative spark CC: BY-NC-SA Lotus Carroll http://www.flickr.com/photos/thelotuscarroll/8634893717/
  • 44. an adaptable resource CC: BY-NC-nd de.laina http://www.flickr.com/photos/delainamonster/2849056106/
  • 45. a driver of innovation CC: By Robert S. Donovan hhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/4211421316/
  • 46. an investment in a new educational paradigm CC: BY-NC-nd jessica lucia http://www.flickr.com/photos/theloushe/4812675727/
  • 47. the past Some rights reserved gioiadeantoniis
  • 48. Source: http://ocw.mit.edu/
  • 49. source: The New York Times source: MIT
  • 50. Increase in Involvement source: OCW Consortium
  • 51. 2008 - 2012: period of adoption source: OCW Consortium
  • 52. 2008 - 2012: period of innovation
  • 53. “There’s not much Good Open Content out there.” there are many myths. Some rights reserved Michał Sacharewicz
  • 54. The Numbers 4 million openly licensed videos (lectures, modules, etc.) 17 million free media files (photos, videos, sounds) 240 million free, sharable photos (with CC license) 42,000 public domain books (65 languages)
  • 55. Language Specific OER
  • 56. there are many challenges. mjzitek Some rights reserved
  • 57. Challenges & Difficulties in Search no single repository a lack of consistent metadata makes it difficult to always find resources various repositories use different APIs broken links lack of clear licensing information, difficult to determine if something is OER or not Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlscotland/3011974213/
  • 58. C All Rights Reserved
  • 59. outdated teaching methods uniinnsbruck Some rights reserved
  • 60. A vs. d c2 A1B g f8 h e 4 B
  • 61. we are part of the problem.
  • 62. the beginning I like Some rights reserved
  • 63. Freedom; not free beer. PtM 1985 Some rights reserved
  • 64. It’s Good to Share Create content using tools that make it easy to share Share what you create; license it using Creative Commons Encourage others to share Support those who do share Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/4900465601/
  • 65. how we learn, not what we learn.
  • 66. where to start let’s get back to the idea of education being an organic environment. our role to cultivate an environment for growth and improvement and to personalize teaching and learning. Public Domain Content: http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/4011523181/
  • 67. “...life is not linear; it’s organic. We create our lives symbiotically as we explore our talents in relation to the circumstances they help to create for us.” - Sir Ken Robinson (TED 2006) CC: BY-SA Sebastiaan ter Burg http://www.flickr.com/photos/ter-burg/3570012810/
  • 68. “...it’s not about scaling a new solution; it’s about creating a movement in education in which people develop their own solutions, but with external support based on personalized curriculum.” - Sir Ken Robinson (TED 2006) CC: BY-SA Sebastiaan ter Burg http://www.flickr.com/photos/ter-burg/3570012810/ “When we look at reforming education and transforming it, it isn’t like cloning a system. It’s about customizing to your circumstances and personalizing education to the people you’re already teaching. And doing that...is the answer to the future because it’s not about scaling a new solution; it’s about creating a movement in education in which people develop their own solutions, but with external support based on personalized curriculum.”
  • 69. “We haven’t come close to tapping the full potential of OER. We need to help more people understand that these materials are not just free, they can also create communities of teachers and learners who collaborate on their continuous improvement, and that’s the real magic – in the actual reuse and remix.” - Cathy Casserly (Creative Commons) CC BY 3.0 Digital Public Library of America: http://dp.la/info/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/CCasserly_highres.jpg
  • 70. Garin Fons Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning garin@austin.utexas.edu Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.