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Beyond Open Access: OER - Open Access Week 2009
 

Beyond Open Access: OER - Open Access Week 2009

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You have questions about how to open your content. Open.Michigan has solutions to help you share your materials openly and connect yourself to a global learning community.

You have questions about how to open your content. Open.Michigan has solutions to help you share your materials openly and connect yourself to a global learning community.

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  • what do we hope to see by expanding educational, cultural, informational access to information? <br /> <br /> HOLISTIC - culture not only using open materials, but creating their own and sharing <br /> <br /> DEFINING - de-emphasis of teacher/student hierarchy; reborn as learners -- OER <br />
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  • e.g. the U-M mission is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence in creating, communicating, preserving and applying knowledge, art, and academic values, and in developing leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. <br />
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  • Professor Walter Lewin - physics <br />
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  • How does anyone do this? this is not magic. it’s effort that requires people like you, but it rewards itself. <br />
  • 40% of cost towards staff - that’s close to $2 million/year for MIT <br />
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Beyond Open Access: OER - Open Access Week 2009 Beyond Open Access: OER - Open Access Week 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • Beyond Open Access: OER / open access week workshop / march 2009 < Open.Michigan > < U-M Libraries > Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Copyright © 2009 The Regents of the University of Michigan
  • Open.Michigan We help content creators maximize the return on digital resources by helping make these resources free and open for use and reuse by people worldwide.
  • Workshop objectives. together. • explore the concept of Open Educational Resources (OER) and its potential contribution to the University of Michigan and other communities of sharing • understand the challenges of producing OER and get a glimpse of the process of developing openly licensed resources • sort through copyright and open licensing issues • learn how you can begin to effectively create OER the deliverable: a perfect score in copyright jeopardy
  • the end current landscape life cycle challenges the beginning
  • Mark Shandro - http://www.flickr.com/photos/mshandro/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en Begin at the end.
  • Where does this all lead? toward a culture of “OPEN-ness”: • a culture using creative materials for a variety of purposes: art, music, education, etc. • holistic view--how we get there is important • defining the 21st century education landscape
  • How do we get there? • faculty & students using and creating openly licensed educational media • institutions supporting open access journals and textbooks • developers building openly licensed software tools on open source platforms • all parties participating in innovative teaching and learning exercises
  • Public Domain: Michael Reschke http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OERlogo.svg
  • What are the main features of OER? “...educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some license to re-mix, improve and redistribute.” • the content (courses & learning assets) • the delivery (electronic & print media) • the use and reuse (copyright licensing)
  • What are the institutional goals for OER? • share and make teaching and learning resources easier to reuse for your community and for people everywhere • increase collaboration across institutions and disciplines through sharing educational content, courses, and curricula • support the mission of the university
  • Who benefits from OER production? • you • classmates • students • friends • faculty • family • alumni • self-learners • partner universities • public knowledge centers • outside universities OER can benefit all these groups simultaneously
  • A few specific benefits. • recognition :: faculty showcase work and connect with other researchers • participatory learning :: students participate in helping with publishing, content creation • curriculum development :: faculty and institutions increase curriculum collaboration with outside universities by opening and sharing resources • transparency :: staff have a more transparent view of university efforts and materials, which allows them to participate in the education process and better assist faculty research and instruction
  • What do we mean by open? “...educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some license to re-mix, improve and redistribute.” • free, as in no fees, does not mean open • open access does not mean openly licensed
  • Important differences “wait a second... this is open access week! you can’t tell us we’re not open! go home!” okay, but we’re going beyond open access - we’re going beyond open use and onto re:use and re:mix and re:distribution and re:re:re:re::::::
  • Open licensing: Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • Creative Commons: license conditions BY :: Attribution You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • Creative Commons: license conditions SA :: Share Alike You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work. http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • Creative Commons: license conditions NC :: Noncommercial You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only. http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • Creative Commons: license conditions ND :: No derivatives You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it. http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • Creative Commons: licenses http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • Some rights reserved: a spectrum. Public All Rights Domain Reserved least restrictive most restrictive http://creativecommons.org/license/
  • A couple of important distinctions
  • The difference between OA and OER. OA: Open Access OER: Open Educational Resources • OA focuses on sharing content, but no underlying licensing requirement • OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license (nix ND) • OER and OA are friends
  • OA // OER - buddies OA free, permanent, full-text, online access to scientific and scholarly works OER openly licensed educational content
  • The difference between OCW and OER. OCW: Open CourseWare OER: Open Educational Resources • OCW focuses on sharing open content that is developed specifically to instruct a course (locally taught) • OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license, whether or not it is a part of a course • OCW is a subset of OER
  • OCW // OER - overlap OER OCW, single images, general campus lectures, image collections, singular learning OCW modules, paper or article syllabi, lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, lecture videos - all related to a course
  • OER and eLearning: a relationship. OER • may exist in electronic or paper form • may not contain enough context to be “instructional” • are always licensed for reuse, redistribution, and re-mixing eLearning resources • exist only in electronic form • are generally designed to be instructional • may not always be licensed for open use
  • eLearning // OER - intersection OER eLearning intersection represents open, electronic, instructional resources
  • the end current landscape life cycle challenges the beginning
  • http://ocw.mit.edu/
  • source: The New York Times source: MIT
  • Recent Developments source: OCW Consortium
  • http://ocwconsortium.org/
  • http://www.oerafrica.org/
  • http://www.tessafrica.net/
  • http://open.umich.edu/
  • http://creativecommons.org/
  • http://learn.creativecommons.org/
  • http://sciencecommons.org/
  • the end current landscape life cycle challenges the beginning
  • The OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing Publishing Archiving
  • The OER life cycle. Authoring creating resources designing learning experiences granting permission - licensing
  • The OER life cycle. Clearing dealing with policy issues tracking content use attaching metadata
  • The OER life cycle. Editing editing and formatting the resource converting the resource to various distribution media
  • The OER life cycle. distributing the resource adding value to the resource (creative uses of metadata, search, online communities, etc.)
  • The OER life cycle. Publishing distributing the resource adding value to the resource (creative uses of metadata, search, online communities, etc.)
  • The OER life cycle. Archiving refreshing/retiring resources preserving past resources maintaining access to past resources
  • U-M OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing Publishing Archiving
  • U-M OER life cycle. various techniques & tools Authoring Clearing Editing Publishing Archiving
  • U-M OER life cycle. various techniques & tools Authoring Clearing OERca software Editing Publishing Archiving
  • U-M OER life cycle. various techniques & tools Authoring Clearing OERca software authoring tools Editing Publishing Archiving
  • U-M OER life cycle. various techniques & tools Authoring Clearing OERca software authoring tools Editing Open.Michigan & Publishing eduCommons Archiving
  • U-M OER life cycle. various techniques & tools Authoring Clearing OERca software authoring tools Editing Open.Michigan & Publishing eduCommons DSpace (?) Archiving
  • Publishing U-M OER. http://open.umich.edu/ http://michigan.educommons.net/
  • Publishing U-M OER.
  • Publishing U-M OER.
  • Publishing U-M OER.
  • Publishing U-M OER.
  • Publishing U-M OER.
  • Producing OER. c curriculum OER people into convert materials Who are these people?
  • How it’s being done, elsewhere. Traditional OCW/OER Challenges publication model • cost • Staff Centric • access to faculty • Retroactive • scale • refresh rate
  • how else can we do this?
  • dScribe
  • dScribe publishing model goals: • scalable • sustainable • participatory approach: • automate and simplify a complex process • leverage capacity of institutional technologies and talents
  • Motivated students...
  • Motivated students... collaborate with faculty...
  • Motivated students... collaborate with faculty... and a team of U-M OER specialists...
  • Motivated students... collaborate with faculty... and a team of U-M OER specialists... to gather, review, edit, and publish course materials...
  • Motivated students... collaborate with faculty... and a team of U-M OER specialists... to gather, review, edit, and publish course materials... for use by students, educators and self-learners...
  • Motivated students... collaborate with faculty... and a team of U-M OER specialists... to gather, review, edit, and publish course materials... for use by students, educators and self-learners... worldwide.
  • “dScribes” do-it-yourself, digital, distributed motivated students or individuals who: • organize, clear, tag course materials • are familiar with technology and software • learn about intellectual property & copyright • engage with content in new ways
  • faculty & dScribe2 dScribe attends faculty & dScribe2 connect: license training course led recruit dScribe material as OER by dScribe2 publish dScribe to OER site Publishing faculty transfers course material to dScribe Process Class #1 Agenda: Class #1 Agenda: roles dScribe identifies faculty reviews & documents material: publish potential IP issues to U-M OER site dScribe clear IP Class #1 Agenda: dScribe2 dScribe makes OER team reviews & necessary edits to clears IP issues course material instructor BY: Garin Fons, Pieter Kleymeer characters by Ryan Junell
  • dScribe cast of characters dScribe Faculty dScribe2
  • license material
  • license material That’s easy!
  • select a dScribe Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for this course
  • select a dScribe I’ll do it! Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for this course
  • dScribe training course
  • dScribe training course decision trees open resources fun! copyright
  • transfer material Class #1 Agenda:
  • transfer material Class #1 Agenda:
  • vet material Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for open.michigan Class #1 Agenda:
  • vet material OERca: Content & Decision Management Software Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for open.michigan Class #1 Agenda:
  • OERca
  • Modeling workflow
  • review material Content Processing Class #1 Agenda:
  • review material OERca: Content & Decision Management Software Content Processing Where does this image come from? Class #1 Agenda:
  • edit material Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for open.michigan
  • edit material Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for open.michigan
  • final review Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for open.michigan
  • final review Looks Class #1 Agenda: find dScribe for open.michigan good!
  • publication open.michigan Class #1 Agenda:
  • faculty & dScribe2 dScribe attends faculty & dScribe2 connect: license training course led recruit dScribe material as OER by dScribe2 publish dScribe to OER site Publishing faculty transfers course material to dScribe Process Class #1 Agenda: Class #1 Agenda: roles dScribe identifies faculty reviews & documents material: publish potential IP issues to U-M OER site dScribe clear IP Class #1 Agenda: dScribe2 dScribe makes OER team reviews & necessary edits to clears IP issues course material instructor BY: Garin Fons, Pieter Kleymeer characters by Ryan Junell
  • dScribe publication model benefits to students: • master course content • learn about copyright and copyleft • establish unique connection w/ faculty • potential to get course credit • collaborate w/ other dedicated classmates • make resources available to everyone
  • dScribe publication model benefits to faculty: • students in course know best! • establishing unique connection w/ students • quality assurance of materials • obtain user feedback on content >> improve content
  • dScribe publication model issues we have noted: • difference between student quality and faculty quality of work • limited expertise in subject area • limited time to devote to OER production • difficult to obtain the right balance of incentives for participation and production
  • the end current landscape life cycle challenges © the beginning
  • What we have experienced. OER production challenges: • cost • scale • access to faculty • content delivery • metadata • refresh rate • active vs. retroactive publishing • risk management • defining OER as a service
  • Reducing risk: production policies. policies create an infrastructure to deal with issues. OER production typically involves three main policy areas: • copyright and other intellectual property • endorsement of products or people • privacy of students or patients
  • Main policy areas. • copyright :: U.S. law grants limited exclusive rights to authors of creative works • endorsement :: U-M has a policy restricting what representatives of our institution may endorse • privacy :: the U.S. government tends to protect patient and student privacy
  • Identify potential issues. • policies will determine publishing limits and publishing processes • we want to know what types of content may cause problems when publishing to a wide audience • we quickly identify these issues, document them, and deal with them
  • ©
  • Artwork these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Charts
  • Graphs
  • Illustrations: Cartoons these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Illustrations: Chemical Representations
  • Drawings and Diagrams some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Graphics some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Scientific Images
  • Ads, CD/Book/Movie Covers, Screenshots some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Photographs some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Text: Quotes, Passages, Poems The Mesh We have come to the cross-roads And I must either leave or come with you. I lingered over the choice But in the darkness of my doubts You lifted the lamp of love And I saw in your face The road that I should take. - Kwesi Brew some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
  • Dealing with issues. • retainment :: you may already have or choose to obtain permission to use content from a 3rd party (must be openly licensed), or the content does not have a policy issue • replacement :: you may want to replace content that cannot be shared with open content that can be distributed through copyright licensing (Creative Commons) • removal :: you may need to remove content due to privacy, endorsement or copyright concerns
  • the end current landscape life cycle challenges the beginning
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring With pre-production clearing, content moves through the Clearing process smoothly Editing Publishing Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring With pre-production clearing, content moves through the Clearing process smoothly Editing Publishing Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring With pre-production clearing, content moves through the Clearing process smoothly Editing Publishing Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring With pre-production clearing, content moves through the Clearing process smoothly Editing Publishing Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring With pre-production clearing, content moves through the Clearing process smoothly Editing Publishing Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring With pre-production clearing, content moves through the Clearing process smoothly Editing Publishing Archiving
  • Pre-production clearing - stages. Authoring + Clearing use content created locally (from U-M) choose 3rd party content from open sources that give explicit open licenses (or content that is in the public domain) document all 3rd party content with pertinent source information
  • Pre-production clearing - stages. Editing display a clear notice of how others may use your work (Open.Michigan uses a CC: BY license) edit the resource to include 3rd party licenses and source citations
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing With post-production Publishing clearing, the system gets clogged up and becomes less efficient Archiving
  • Post-production clearing - stages. Clearing 1 search through materials to be published and identify potentially problematic content document all problematic content with pertinent information
  • Post-production clearing - stages. Clearing 2 based on your “policy,” analyze the problematic content and decide what to do with it depending on your decision, clear content (retainment, replacement, removal)
  • Post-production clearing - stages. Editing edit the resource to replace/remove problematic content edit the resource to include 3rd party licenses and source citations display a clear notice of how others may use your work (Open.Michigan uses a CC: BY license)
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing The clearing+editing Publishing process can eat up a lot of time if you do post- production clearing. Archiving
  • Remember the OER life cycle. Authoring Clearing Editing The clearing+editing Publishing process can eat up a lot of time if you do post- production clearing. Archiving
  • Pre-production clearing - examples. the scenario: you are putting together a presentation on pancreatic disorders. you have a few images to use as examples from your own portfolio as well as a few with permission from your colleague. however, you’re missing a good example on pancreatic hematoma. while you could start with a Google image search, you decide to begin looking through open content repositories.
  • https://open.umich.edu/wiki/index.php5/Open_Content_Search
  • http://commons.wikimedia.org/
  • Image courtesy of Herbert L. Fred, MD and Hendrik A. van Dijk - <http://cnx.org/content/m14942/latest/> Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/>
  • Pre-production clearing - examples.
  • Post-production clearing - examples. the scenario: you are converting a presentation you gave last year into OER. this means you need to use the post-production clearing process to make sure the content is ready for OER publication. you start by identifying and documenting all the 3rd party content you used.
  • Post-production clearing - examples.
  • Colin Rhinesmith - http://www.flickr.com/photos/colinrhinesmith/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en