The olympic rings mean and represent

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The olympic rings mean and represent

  1. 1.  The five interlaced rings which are depicted on the Olympic flag are known as the Olympic rings. These design, featuring rings coloured blue, yellow, black, green and red interlaced into one another, is basically the symbol of the Olympic games. The Olympic rings were designed by Pierre de Coubertin in 1912. The five rings represented the five parts of the world i.e. the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa and Oceania. Both the Americas were regarded as a single continent, while Antarctica was not taken into consideration. Though no colour is demarcated to a particular continent or region, various theories about the Olympic rings colour meaning tend to associate them with various citations. For instance, at least one of the five colours among the Olympic rings is present on the flag of each of the participating countries. The five Olympic rings were adopted in 1914 and made their debut at the Belgium Olympics in 1920.
  2. 2.  Symbolism of the Olympic Rings The five interlocking rings represent five continents or major geographical areas of the world. The five main regions: Africa, the Americas (North and South America are combined), Asia, Europe and Oceania. As it says in the Olympic Charter, the five-ringed symbol "represents the union of the five continents and the meeting of athletes from throughout the world at the Olympic Games." The colours of the rings represent the flags of the countries that participate in the Olympics. Every flag of a country participating in the Olympics includes at least one of the following colours: blue, black, red, yellow, and green. Baron Pierre de Coubertin conceived the design of both the rings and the flag. The Olympic Committee adopted the flag in 1914, and it was first flown at the 1920 Antwerp Games.

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