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Slides from presentation given to students at Staffordshire University. Includes: 1) Ofcom ‘s proposed priorities for 2011-12. and 2) Consumer Trends in the UK - looking at both usage and take up. ...

Slides from presentation given to students at Staffordshire University. Includes: 1) Ofcom ‘s proposed priorities for 2011-12. and 2) Consumer Trends in the UK - looking at both usage and take up. All data and slides are culled from previous presentations which are all in the public domain.

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Presentation to Staffordshire University, Faculty of Arts Media and Design, March 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Presentation to Staffordshire University Faculty of Arts Media and Design
    Damian Radcliffe, Manager, Nations & Communities
    1st March 2011
  • 2. Running Order
    Ofcom ‘s proposed priorities for 2011-12.
    Consumer Trends in the UK
    The Broadcasting Code
    Benchmarking the UK against the rest of the world
  • 3. Ofcom’s Draft Annual Plan 2011/12
    Damian Radcliffe, Manager Nations & Communities
    1st March 2011
  • 4. About Ofcom
    Ofcom is the regulator for the UK communications industries, with responsibilities across television, radio, telecommunications and wireless communications services
    It is independent of Government but accountable to Parliament
    Ofcom’s sponsoring Departments of State are:
    the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS)
    the Department for Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS)
    Set up - and its powers and duties defined – by the Communications Act 2003
  • 5. Where we came from
  • 6. 5
    Ofcom’s statutory duties
    Under the Communications Act 2003
    “It shall be the principal duty of Ofcom, in carrying out their functions;(a) to further the interests of citizens in relation to communications matters; and(b) to further the interests of consumers in relevant markets, where appropriate by promoting competition"
    Ofcom’s specific duties fall into six areas:
    Ensuring the optimal use of the electro-magnetic spectrum
    Ensuring that a wide range of electronic communications services - including high speed data services - is available throughout the UK
    Ensuring a wide range of TV and radio services of high quality and wide appeal
    Maintaining plurality in the provision of broadcasting
    Applying adequate protection for audiences against offensive or harmful material
    Applying adequate protection for audiences against unfairness or the infringement of privacy
  • 7. What we don’t do
  • 8. Ofcom’s Annual Plan 2011/12
    7
    Draft Annual Plan
    Final Annual Plan
    Published end of March along with budget for the financial year
    Published for consultation which closes 1 March 2011
  • 9. Ofcom’s Annual Plan 2011/12 is published in the context of a changing environment…
    8
    Deregulation where appropriate
    Addressing disputes and appeals
    Government’s public policy
    Challenging public finances
    UK and EU legal framework
    Increasing internationalisation
    8
  • 10. …and consumer behaviour and new technologies are shaping the wider communications sector
    9
    • New ways to access content and services
    • 11. Traditional media is still important
    • 12. Spectrum demand increasing
    • 13. New consumer challenges
    • 14. Increasing role for communications services to deliver public policy outcomes
  • Ofcom has five strategic purposes
    10
    Help communications markets to work for consumers
    Promote effective and sustainable competition
    Contribute to and implement public policy defined by Parliament
    Promote the efficient use of public assets
    Provide appropriate assurance to audiences on standards
  • 15. 11
    Proposed priorities for 2011/12
    • Ensuring fair and effective competition in pay TV services
    • 16. Promoting super-fast broadband competition/investment
    Competition
    • Clearing and Releasing spectrum
    • 17. Safeguarding frequencies for London 2012 Games
    Public
    assets
    • Ensuring information so customers can make informed choices
    • 18. Enabling consumers to switch providers easily
    Consumer
    Content
    • Streamlining the broadcasting standards procedures
    • 19. Considering new regulatory approaches to content regulation
    • 20. Implementing online copyright infringement provisions
    • 21. Reporting on Ch. 3 and 5 licensing arrangements
    • 22. Preparing for post
    Public
    policy
  • 23. Promote effective and sustainable competition
    • Ensuring fair and effective competition in the delivery of pay TV services
    • 24. Promoting competition and investment in the delivery of superfast broadband
    12
  • 25. Promote the efficient use of public assets
    • Timely spectrum clearance to enable new awards
    • 26. Auctioning of the 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz spectrum bands
    • 27. Delivering the Government’s spectrum guarantee for the London 2012 Olympic & Paralympic Games
    • 28. Developing a future-looking spectrum policy work programme taking account of market developments and future demand for spectrum
    13
  • 29. Help communications markets to work for consumers
    • Ensuring Communications Providers deliver clear information so that broadband consumers can make informed choices
    • 30. Developing and implement policies that will improve the ease of switching between Communications Providers for consumers
    14
  • 31. Provide appropriate assurance to audiences on standards
    • Implementing streamlined broadcasting standards procedures
    • 32. Considering new regulatory approaches to content regulation
    • 33. Content regulation remains relevant for the protection of adults, minors, the democratic debate and individuals as subjects of the media
    15
  • 34. Contribute to and implement public policy defined by Parliament
    16
    • Implement Digital Economy Act 2010 provisions around Online Copyright Infringement
    • 35. Prepare statutory report to Government on licensing arrangements for Channels 3 & 5 after 2014
    • 36. Prepare for and fulfil regulatory duties in relation to Post
  • Beyond the priorities there are a number of major work areas for us in 2011/12
    Implement new regulatory responsibilities including those arising from the revised European Communications Framework
    Implement proposals in relation to mobile termination rates
    Ensure the availability of telephone number ranges
    Simplify regulation of non-geographic services
    Support Digital Switchover (DSO) for TV and radio
    Promoting investment that will address mobile ‘not-spots’
    Conduct first infrastructure review
    17
  • 37. …and we are undertaking substantial work to improve our services for citizens, consumers and stakeholders
    Licensing access to spectrum and keeping it free of interference
    Offering more online tools to stakeholders
    Protection from and enforcement against unfair terms and practices by communications providers
    Conducting and publishing market research and analysis
    18
  • 38. Summary
    19
    New responsibilities
    28.2% savings
    Legislative reform
    Delivering our purposes and priorities
  • 39. 20
    Q&A
  • 40. Trends
    Damian Radcliffe, Manager Nations & Communities
    1st March 2011
  • 41. We’re going to explore
    22
    The UK Communications Consumer
    The changing world of Public Service Broadcasting (PSB)
    Benchmarking the UK against the Rest of the World (if we have time)
  • 42. 23
    The 2010 Communications Market Report
    Damian Radcliffe, Manager, Nations & Communities
  • 43. 24
    CMR England part of a suite of Communications
    Markets Reports
    CMR Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales (in English and Welsh)
    CMR UK
    (also published in August)
    International version
    • Part of Ofcom’s regulatory principle to research markets constantly and to make public our consumer research
    • 44. Also fulfils Ofcom’s duty under Section 358 of the same Act to publish an annual factual and statistical report
  • 25
    The communications market in 2009 – key stories
    • How people are using media and communications
    • 45. Internet access in your pocket
    • 46. Mind the generation gap
    • 47. Traditional media is holding up
    • 48. Consumers getting more for less
  • Nearly half of our waking hours are spent using media and communications
    26
    24 hours
    Waking hours
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 49. 27
    One fifth of time spent using media is simultaneous
    We cram over 3 hours of multi-tasking activity into 1 hour 23 minutes
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 50. 28
    The communications market in 2009 – key stories
    • How people are using media and communications
    • 51. Internet access in your pocket
    • 52. Mind the generation gap
    • 53. Traditional media is holding up
    • 54. Consumers getting more for less
  • More people are surfing the internet on their mobile…
    Number of users up by half in past year
    Source: The Nielsen Company
    Note: The figure reflects the number of people (aged 15+) who declare having visited any site on the internet on their mobile phone in the past 30 days
  • 55. 30
    More than a quarter now own a smartphone
    Number of smartphone users has more than doubled in last two years
    Penetration of mobile users aged 13+
    Source: comScore, Mobilens, December 2007 - May 2010
  • 56. 31
    Facebook is the most popular site on the mobile web
    It accounts for nearly half of mobile web use
    Source: GSMA Mobile Media Metrics, December 2009
  • 57. 32
    The communications market in 2009 – key stories
    • How people are using media and communications
    • 58. Internet access in your pocket
    • 59. Mind the generation gap
    • 60. Traditional media is holding up
    • 61. Consumers getting more for less
  • 33
    Younger people spend nearly a third of their time using media simultaneously
    They cram nearly 5 hours of multi-tasking into just under 2 hours per day
    9h 32m
    8h 48m
    7h 5m
    6h 35m
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 62. 34
    16-24s are more likely to use their mobiles for text-based communications
    Over 55s still use mobiles primarily for voice calls
    Social networking
    Text messaging
    Phone calls
    Text messaging
    Phone calls
    Email
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 63. 35
    Half of over 55s now have broadband
    They are the fastest growing age group
    Proportion of respondents (per cent)
    Q1 2009
    Q1 2010
    Q1 2009
    Q1 2010
    All adults aged 15+
    All aged 55+
    Source: Ofcom research, data as at Q1 of each yearBase: All adults aged 15+
  • 64. 36
    Over-55s more likely to use a computer for email
    16-24s spend more time social networking or instant messaging
    Social networking
    Instant messaging
    Emails
    Social networking
    Emails
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 65. Use of social networking has grown among all age groups
    It is growing more rapidly among over 25s
    Proportion of adults who access social networking sites on the internet at home
    Source: Ofcom research
    37
  • 66. 38
    The communications market in 2009 – key stories
    • How people are using media and communications
    • 67. Internet access in your pocket
    • 68. Mind the generation gap
    • 69. Traditional media is holding up
    • 70. Consumers getting more for less
  • 39
    TV and radio still most popular media activities
    TV viewing is growing and radio reach is at record levels
    MORNING
    LUNCHTIME
    TEATIME
    PEAK TIME
    Email, social networking, text messaging
    Reading
    Phone calls
    Peak time TV
    Breakfast radio
    Drive time
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 71. 40
    Popularity of TV driven by strong growth of DVRs and HDTV
    Over 5 million HDTV homes and over 24 million HD-ready sets sold
    DVR penetration
    HD broadcast homes
    2005
    2009
    Q1 2009
    Q2 2010
    Source: Ofcom research/industry data
  • 72. 41
    Growth in texting and mobile voice as well as mobile data
    Traditional means of mobile communications still growing
    Texting
    2009
    104 billion
    2004
    27 billion
    Mobile data volumes
    2009
    (+240%)
    Mobile voice minutes
    2009
    118 billion
    2007
    2004
    64 billion
    2004
    6
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 73. 42
    The Communications Market in 2009 – key stories
    • How people are using media and communications
    • 74. Internet access in your pocket
    • 75. Mind the generation gap
    • 76. Traditional media is holding up
    • 77. Consumers getting more for less
  • 43
    Average household communications bills have fallen by over 9% since 2004
    50% of households buy communications services in bundles
    Source: Ofcom research
  • 78. 44
    The UK PSB Scene
    Damian Radcliffe, Manager, Nations & Communities
  • 79. PSB purposes
    45
    Informing our understanding of the world - To inform ourselves and others and to increase our understanding of the world through news, information and analysis of current events and ideas
    Stimulating knowledge and learning -To stimulate our interest in and knowledge of arts, science, history and other topics through content that is accessible and can encourage informal learning
    Reflecting UK cultural identity - To reflect and strengthen our cultural identity through original programming at UK, national and regional level, on occasion bringing audiences together for shared experiences
    Representing diversity and alternative viewpoints - To make us aware of different cultures and alternative viewpoints, through programmes that reflect the lives of other people and other communities, both within the UK and elsewhere
  • 80. PSB characteristics
    46
    High quality - well-funded and well-produced
    Original - new UK content rather than repeats or acquisitions
    Innovative - breaking new ideas or re-inventing exciting approaches, rather than copying old ones
    Challenging - making viewers think
    Engaging - remaining accessible and attractive to viewers
    Widely available - if content is publicly funded, a large majority of citizens need to be given the chance to watch it
  • 81. 47
    The UK TV market is experiencing a period of rapid change
    Penetration of digital technologies rising
    Audience share for the five main channels falling
    78%
    69%
    84%
    64%
    51%
    54%
    47%
    11%
    2003
    2007
    2003
    2007
    2007
    2003
    2007
    2003
    Source: Ofcom
    Source: BARB
  • 82. 48
    The central challenge – the move from analogue to a digital model of Public Service Broadcasting
  • 83. 49
    Impact of Digital TV
    Over 90% of households now have access to Digital TV
    Digital Switchover means all homes will be multi-channel by 2012
    Digital homes have access to around 40 channels on Freeview and over 400 channels on multichannel subscription – representing huge choice for viewers.
    By 2012 the 5 channel home will be moribund. For many it already is.
  • 84. Market changes
  • 85. UK sample that are self-claimed regular viewers
    Any PSB Channel
    2006
    Shows direction of significant differences from 2006/2008 to 2009, 99% level)
    2008
    Base: All respondents 7603, 7192, 6845, 6981
    Source: Ofcom PSB Tracker, GfK NOP
    51
    51
  • 86. Average hours of daily viewing, 2005-2009
    All TV viewing
    PSB channels only
    Source: BARB 2005 and 2009, Network
    Average hours of viewing per day, all PSB channels vs. Total TV (all TV channels)
  • 87. 53
    Summary: hours watched and weekly reach
    Hours of viewing*
    While the average hours of total daily TV viewing increased by 3% between 2005 and 2009, the average hours of daily viewing to all PSB channels** dropped by 15% over the same period:
    the steepest decline in viewing of the PSB channels was among viewers aged 16-24, for whom viewing fell by 25% over the past five years (although this age group was still watching as much television overall in 2009 as they were in 2005);
    the smallest decrease in viewing to the PSB channels occurred among viewers in the 45-54 age group, who watched 8% less of the PSB channels than they did in 2005.
    *Hours of viewing is defined as the average hours of television viewed per day, either live , or recorded in the past 7 days.
    ** The PSB channels are defined as BBC One, BBC Two, ITV1, Channel 4/S4C, Five, BBC Three, BBC Four, BBC News, BBC Parliament, BBC HD, CBeebies and CBBC.
    ***Average weekly reach is defined as the proportion of the population that watched at least 15 consecutive minutes of a channel in an average week.
    ****’Portfolio channels’ is comprised of the PSBs’ affiliated channels, such as ITV2, BBC Three, E4 etc. It excludes the main five PSB channels. The actual number of channels that make up the PSB portfolios has increased over the years, and the proportion of people with multichannel television has also grown substantially year on year. Not all of these channels are PSB channels.
  • 88. Channel shares in all homes, 1986 - 2008
    Source: BARB
  • 89. Peak time channel share in all homes, 1993 - 2009
    Source: BARB, 18:00 – 22:30
    55
  • 90. Total viewing of UK/national News, all individuals, main 5 PSB channels only
    Total hours per year watched by average individual (4+)
    88
    92
    92
    90
    100
    Source: BARB, 2005-2009
  • 91. Total viewing hours of National News, main PSB channels only, by age group
    Total hours per year watched by average individual (4+)
    103
    28
    50
    195
    71
    143
    Source: BARB, 2008
  • 92. 58
    PSBs face declining income as well as audiences
    Increased competition for advertising revenue from other TV channels and internet
    2007 TV advertising
    1993 TV advertising
    Other channels
    Otherchannels
    Channel 4
    ITV1
    ITV1
    Channel 4
  • 93. 59
    Summary: Audience profiles
    Of the main five PSB channels in 2009, the two BBC channels had the oldest viewing profiles; viewing that came from viewers aged 55 or older stood at 54% for BBC Two, and 52% for BBC Two (See Figure D8). For both channels, this represented a shift towards viewing from viewers aged 55+ compared with 2008, of 1% and 3% respectively.
    BBC Parliament, BBC News and BBC Four also tended to attract an older audience; 62% of BBC Parliament‘s audience fell in to the 55+ age group in 2009, while 54% of BBC News’ and 51% of BBC Four’s audience was in this age group.
    BBC Three, Channel 4 and Five had the youngest viewing profiles in 2009; 31% of BBC Three’s viewers were 24 years old or younger, while 18% of Five’s and 14% of Channel Four’s viewers fell into this younger age group.
    Nearly a quarter of the viewing to BBC HD came from viewers in the 35-44 age group, considerably higher than for any other PSB channel in 2009.
    All 5 of the main PSB channels attracted a lower proportion of their viewing from viewers in the DE socio-economic group than they did in 2008. Five remained the channel which attracted the highest proportion of these viewers at 44% in 2009 (See Figure D9).
    BBC HD and BBC Four gained the highest proportion of viewers from audiences falling in AB socio -economic groups; 33% and 30% respectively.
  • 94. Age profile of channel viewers, 2009
    Source: BARB 2009, Network
    Profile data calculated on a base of all individuals 4+
    60
  • 95. Socio-economic profile of channel viewers, 2009
    Source: BARB 2009, Network
    Profile data calculated on a base of all individuals 4+
    61
  • 96. 62
    Summary: hours watched and weekly reach
    Weekly reach***
    Weekly reach for BBC Two remained relatively stable comparing July 2005 and July 2009, dropping by 1%. BBC One and Five experienced minor declines, average weekly reach falling by only 2% and 3% respectively. I
    TV1 and Channel 4 both had slightly greater declines in weekly reach, with ITV1 falling by 9%, and Channel 4 falling by 11%.
    BBC Three’s weekly reach also rose by 11% in July 2009, while BBC Four’s rose by 6% (See Figure D2).
    The average weekly reach of all of the PSB portfolio channels combined**** increased by 2% from 2008 to 2009, but the rate of increase has slowed down significantly from previous years (See Figure D3).
    The BBC’s portfolio channels, ITV channels, and Channel 4 channels all saw an annual increase of around 1%.
    Five’s portfolio channels increased their average weekly reach by less than 1% since 2008.
    ***Average weekly reach is defined as the proportion of the population that watched at least 15 consecutive minutes of a channel in an average week.
    ****’Portfolio channels’ is comprised of the PSBs’ affiliated channels, such as ITV2, BBC Three, E4 etc. It excludes the main five PSB channels. The actual number of channels that make up the PSB portfolios has increased over the years, and the proportion of people with multichannel television has also grown substantially year on year. Not all of these channels are PSB channels.
  • 97. Sum’s new chart
    Average weekly reach of PSB portfolio channels, 2005 - 2009
    15+ minute consecutive reach
    Source: BARB, all individuals 4+
    Note: The actual number of channels that make up the PSB portfolios has increased over the years, and the proportion of people with multichannel television has also grown substantially year on year. Not all of these channels are PSB channels
  • 98. Broadcaster shares in multichannel homes
    Source: BARB, all day, all Multichannel Individuals (4+). Portfolio channels are the PSB channels, excluding the main 5 PSB channels. The actual number of channels that make up the PSB portfolios has increased over the years, and the proportion of people with multichannel television has also grown substantially year on year. Not all of these channels are PSB channels
    64
  • 99. 65
    Rise of Digital TV
    Digital television
    At the end of 2009, take-up of digital television in UK households stood at 91.4%:
    almost 40% of UK homes (39.6%), have DTT on their main TV set.
    Satellite TV is the main TV set in 38.3% of homes.
    Cable television accounted for 12.4% of homes.
    Consumers are continuing to convert additional sets in the home. Almost 69% of all secondary TV sets had been converted to digital by the end of 2009, up 8.5% y-o-y
    Digital switchover
    Nearly 19% of UK households had been covered by digital switchover at the end of 2009**
    In December 2009, the North West of England became the biggest single region to complete switchover. A total of 3.04m homes are served by the Winter Hill transmitter in the Granada region, which covers the major cities of Liverpool and Manchester.
    *http://www.ofcom.org.uk/research/tv/reports/dtv/dtv_2009_q4/dtv_2009_q4.pdf
    ** Ofcom’s UK Communications Market Report, 2009
  • 100. Household take-up of television services: 1999 - 2009
    Source: Ofcom
    Note: GfK and Ofcom research from Q1 2007 onwards; previous quarters use platform operator data, research and Ofcom estimates. Note: TV over ADSL take-up is too low a percentage to register on this chart.
  • 101. Universe of television sets, by platform, Q4 2009
    Total TV sets = 60 million
    Source: GfK research
  • 102. 68
    The rise of High Definition television (HDTV)
    Nearly 3.5m homes had reception equipment capable of receiving high definition television (HDTV) channels at the end of 2009, up from around 1.5m at the end of 2008.
    Sky+ HD accounted for the majority of these, with 2.1m subscribers.
    Virgin Media and Freesat platforms accounted for about 1.4m homes with access to HD channels at the end of 2009.
    Other TV services offer HD content on demand, such as BT Vision, TalkTalk TV.
    The increased adoption of HD-ready TV sets is creating a growing market for HDTV. By the end of 2009, around 22m HD-ready sets had been sold in the UK
    Note: While a home may have a HD-ready TV, this does not mean that they automatically receive HDTV
    channels. They must also have the relevant HD decoder equipment too (unless that have bought a Freesat
    HD or Freeview HD TV, which include HDTV tuners).
  • 103. 69
    UK homes with equipment for HDTV channels:
    Sky, Virgin Media and Freesat
    Source: BSkyB/Virgin Media/Freesat.
    Note: *Freesat data based on HD equipment sold, which does not mean this device necessarily represents the principal means of viewing TV on the main set (for example, Freesat IDTVs could be used to access other HD services). The cumulative number of HD homes, therefore, is indicative only. Figures represent latest available data.
  • 104. HD-ready sets - sales volumes as a % of all set sales
    HD ready sets as % of all sets sold (c. 22 million HD sets sold to date)
    HD-ready sets sold (000s)
    Source: GfK sales data (EPOS data)
  • 105. 71
    The rise of non-linear television
    c.12m digital video recorders (DVRs) had been sold or rented to UK consumers by the end of 2009, up by 1.7m devices in the year.
    Around 7.8m were homes with Sky, Virgin Media or BT Vision platforms.
    At the end of 2009, Virgin Media’s video-on-demand (VoD) service was available to nearly 3.7m digital cable TV homes in the UK*.
    In the fourth quarter of 2009, the company registered 74m VoD uses, more than double the 33m seen in the same period two year earlier.
  • 106. Virgin Media Video-on-Demand usage statistics
    Average VoD view per month (m)
    Source: Virgin Media
    VoD = Video-on-demand, DTV = Digital television
  • 107. Sales and rentals for digital video recorders (DVR)
    73
    Units sold / rented (m)
    Source: Operator results, GfK sales data and Ofcom estimates
    Note: Figures represent sales and not homes. Freeview+andFreesat+ data based on GfK and sales data. BT Vision, V+, Sky+ and Sky+ HD based on operator data. Sky+ figures include the Republic of Ireland. V+ boxes are rented to Virgin Media customers. Data for Freeview, freesat, Top Up TV is based on sales and consumer data so will include replacement devices.
  • 108. Proportion of Live vs. time-shifted viewing by channel, main 5 PSB channels, 2009
    Source: BARB 2009, all individuals with DVRs, main 5 PSB channels
    74
  • 109. 75
    The rise of Online TV services
    Online TV services, which allow consumers to catch-up with programmes ‘on
    demand’ via the internet continued to attract new users in 2009;
    Nearly a third (31%) of all adults with the internet at home claimed to watch online catch-up TV at Q1 2010, up from 23% in Q1 2009.
    The 15-24 age group was the most prolific viewers, with 40% saying that they or their household watched online catch-up TV, while the proportion of over 65s using catch-up TV nearly doubled in a year, from 10% to 18% in 2009.
    The BBC’s iPlayer online TV service registered a unique audience of just over 7m users in December 2009, up from 5m a year earlier In January 2010, 68.2m TV programmes were requested by iPlayer users across different platforms; this had risen from 30.8m in January 2009.
    Both ITV Player and Channel 4’s 4oD also increased their unique audiences in December 2009, to reach 1.4m and 1.3m users respectively (up from 0.7m and 0.2m a year earlier). Demand Five and Sky Player attracted similar sized audiences at the end of 2009, with 0.4m and 0.5m unique users respectively. (see Figure B9).
    * Virgin Media results, Q4 2009.http://phx.corporate-ir.net/External.File?item=UGFyZW50SUQ9MzMxMjl8Q2hpbGRJRD0tMXxUeXBlPTM=&t=1
  • 110. 76
    Proportion of households with home internet who watch online catch-up TV
    Proportion of households (%)
    Source: Ofcom research Q1 2010. QE5A “Which, if any, of these do you or your household use the internet for whilst at home?”.Base: All adults who have the internet at home (2010, n=6163; 15-24 n=1048, 25-34 n=1100, 35-54 n=2464, 55-64 n=860, 65+ n=691; male n=3015, female n=3148).
  • 111. 77
    BBC iPlayer, TV programme requests
    BBC iPlayer TV requests (m)
    Source: iPlayer monthly press pack/ BBC iStats
  • 112. 78
    UK online TV and video services, unique audiences
    Unique audience (000s)
    Source: Nielsen NetView
  • 113. 79
    Break
    When we come back we’ll look at the Broadcasting Code.
    And if there’s time – and interest - compare the UK with other markets…
  • 114. 80
    Thanks for listening.
    damian.radcliffe@ofcom.org.uk @mrdamian76